What users are saying about

3E Elite

1 Ratings

3E Elite

1 Ratings
Score 7 out of 101

Amicus Attorney

6 Ratings
Score 5.1 out of 101

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Likelihood to Recommend

3E Elite

3E Elite is well suited for a company or firm that has many clients and is engaged in pro bono activities, particularly one that will track pro bono time for employees and credit them for that time. Additionally, companies with large clients can use it to determine where the bulk of their business comes from.

Amicus Attorney

Small to medium-sized law firms can greatly benefit from Amicus Attorney. It provides a central repository for all case management as well as calendaring between employees and their assistants. Document automation can also greatly save employee time (requires additional configuration and setup).

Pros

  • Tracks time
  • Separates billable and nonbillable hours
  • Separates by Matters and clients
  • Very efficient calendaring with sync to Outlook calendar (option of Exchange or Outlook level synchronization).
  • Case management including contacts, emails, documents, etc. to keep everything in one consolidated place.
  • Document automation including Word merging or HotDocs (third party). Take case data including custom pages and fields and instantly create documents based on templates with ease.

Cons

  • Being more interactive
  • Allowing for more updates when dates are submitted
  • More easily accessible tracking numbers
  • Subscription based only, formerly allowed "ownership" of software with annual maintenance agreement. Software has moved to a monthly subscription where one "leases" the software from the owner, Abacus.
  • Software stability, can occasionally have server-level issues that require cycling of services in order to restore connectivity.
  • Exchange calendar sync does not warn users that sync is not occurring. After updating Active Directory password, password needs updated in Amicus Attorney. Problem being, it does not remind / alert if the synchronization is not occurring.

Alternatives Considered

No answers on this topic
Amicus Attorney has been a solid competitor for at least a decade. LexisNexis does not seem to invest a lot of time into new features for Time Matters, but the same can be said for Amicus Attorney in recent years. ProLaw is in a category of it's own (especially in regards to price) but does a superb job of case management and document management. Clio is also a bit separated as it's cloud-based but provides many of the same features as Amicus Attorney. Amicus Attorney is the best rounded of the on-premise software options (in features and price).

Return on Investment

  • Very little
  • Large software investment, if not properly configured and utilized this can be a time and money vacuum.
  • If law firm does not have a consistent personality among employees, buy-in may be difficult as it's a significant workflow change for users.
  • Can greatly benefit law firm if used properly and across board for all employees. Uniform data organization for cases and custom pages add to personalizing software for firm.

Pricing Details

3E Elite

General
Free Trial
Free/Freemium Version
Premium Consulting/Integration Services
Entry-level set up fee?
No
Additional Pricing Details

Amicus Attorney

General
Free Trial
Free/Freemium Version
Premium Consulting/Integration Services
Entry-level set up fee?
No
Additional Pricing Details