What users are saying about
Top Rated
159 Ratings
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Top Rated
260 Ratings
Top Rated
159 Ratings
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Score 7.9 out of 101

Wrike

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Top Rated
260 Ratings
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Score 8.3 out of 101

Likelihood to Recommend

Adobe Experience Manager

Adobe Experience Manager is great for managing a collection of sites in a manner that ensures all the sites are on-brand (adheres to an organization's image guidelines) and that also ensures that each individual site is not too rigid; the content on each site can still be customized to appeal to the intended audience.
Tolulope Lawal profile photo

Wrike

I think for software development, Wrike isn't the best tool... I would almost always choose JIRA. I feel like JIRA fails for most other use cases though. I've used quite a few tools - Basecamp, Trello on the lite end (too feature starved for what we need it for), JIRA on the heavy end. Asana and Wrike were the best fit, but I really didn't like Asana's limited interface, and their collaboration abilities were not up to par with Wrike. I also feel like Wrike will scale with our organization, and Asana is something we'd likely outgrow. At a previous org, I customized JIRA pretty hard for more project management oriented tasks, and it worked really well, it just took a LOT out of the gate to get it going, and was super difficult for some of our users to get a handle on.
Ian Nate profile photo

Feature Rating Comparison

Security

Adobe Experience Manager
8.3
Wrike
Role-based user permissions
Adobe Experience Manager
8.3
Wrike

Platform & Infrastructure

Adobe Experience Manager
7.7
Wrike
API
Adobe Experience Manager
7.4
Wrike
Internationalization / multi-language
Adobe Experience Manager
8.0
Wrike

Web Content Creation

Adobe Experience Manager
6.9
Wrike
WYSIWYG editor
Adobe Experience Manager
7.6
Wrike
Code quality / cleanliness
Adobe Experience Manager
6.9
Wrike
Admin section
Adobe Experience Manager
7.5
Wrike
Page templates
Adobe Experience Manager
6.8
Wrike
Library of website themes
Adobe Experience Manager
5.4
Wrike
Mobile optimization / responsive design
Adobe Experience Manager
7.0
Wrike
Publishing workflow
Adobe Experience Manager
7.4
Wrike
Form generator
Adobe Experience Manager
6.4
Wrike

Web Content Management

Adobe Experience Manager
6.0
Wrike
Content taxonomy
Adobe Experience Manager
7.0
Wrike
SEO support
Adobe Experience Manager
6.2
Wrike
Bulk management
Adobe Experience Manager
6.1
Wrike
Availability / breadth of extensions
Adobe Experience Manager
5.6
Wrike
Community / comment management
Adobe Experience Manager
5.3
Wrike

Project Management

Adobe Experience Manager
Wrike
8.1
Task Management
Adobe Experience Manager
Wrike
9.1
Resource Management
Adobe Experience Manager
Wrike
7.6
Gantt Charts
Adobe Experience Manager
Wrike
8.2
Scheduling
Adobe Experience Manager
Wrike
8.6
Workflow Automation
Adobe Experience Manager
Wrike
8.0
Team Collaboration
Adobe Experience Manager
Wrike
9.5
Support for Agile Methodology
Adobe Experience Manager
Wrike
8.4
Support for Waterfall Methodology
Adobe Experience Manager
Wrike
7.5
Document Management
Adobe Experience Manager
Wrike
7.7
Email integration
Adobe Experience Manager
Wrike
7.8
Mobile Access
Adobe Experience Manager
Wrike
8.0
Timesheet Tracking
Adobe Experience Manager
Wrike
7.5
Change request and Case Management
Adobe Experience Manager
Wrike
7.8
Budget and Expense Management
Adobe Experience Manager
Wrike
7.3

Professional Services Automation

Adobe Experience Manager
Wrike
8.1
Quotes/estimates
Adobe Experience Manager
Wrike
8.2
Invoicing
Adobe Experience Manager
Wrike
7.3
Project & financial reporting
Adobe Experience Manager
Wrike
8.6
Integration with accounting software
Adobe Experience Manager
Wrike
8.3

Pros

Adobe Experience Manager

  • Allows non-technical staff to author and publish content by focusing on the content itself and the needs of a given campaign instead of technical implementations.
  • Content workflows allow varying degrees of complexity for content review and quality assurance before providing approvals on any piece before going live.
  • Development teams can build very robust and complex component for handling virtually all posible needs: from integrating back-end web services to UI Widgets for content authoring; from multisite suites to multi-language components, CQ can handle it all thanks to the power of Java and the flexibility of Sling and JCR.
  • Easy to scale for high-traffic sites and thanks to the Publisher/Dispatcher infrastructure, very flexible for caching and load balancing.
Fernando Galeano profile photo

Wrike

  • Wrike offers custom fields including data accumulation for every project/group, so you can track any kind of project in any business.
  • You can use Wrike together with clients or partners by inviting them with different user rights.
  • You can manage different accounts for e.g. different companies you work for with only one login. For example you can manage an enterprise account for your company, and a simple account for your private projects without either parties notice/each other if you don't want to.
Florian Laudahn profile photo

Cons

Adobe Experience Manager

  • Components were introduced to reduce the development & authoring time by reusing them. With some clients, it worked very well because they had page structure and content like that. But if you have UI requirements that can not support component re-usability then your life will be difficult. You will end up creating more and more components in the hope that they will be utilized one day some where on some page... Although you can achieve re-usability by creating smaller customizable component but then again it will increase your development time. In a Nutshell, you will not save development time.
  • Osgi was a great concept. AEM Developer used to write the most of business logic in them but due to adaptation of micro-services, now everybody wants to implement business logic in there instead of AEM internal OSGi. If your architecture had micro services then power of Osgi is useless for you, you will just use 10-20% of it which will bring no big value.
  • License of AEM is super costly, not every organization can afford it. Once you have implemented AEM, it will be hard to get rid of it. Getting rid will mean another investment.
  • Like other products, AEM also releases new versions. Upgrades to new versions never happens smoothly. Means organization needs to spend more money to upgrade the servers.
  • You need a big infrastructure to deploy AEM server setup. Each setup needs at least 3 machines, one for author, one for publisher and one for dispatcher. This means spending more money on maintenance.
  • TouchUI is confusing sometimes for everyone i.e business, authors, developers.
Sujeet Sharma profile photo

Wrike

  • Wrike worked very well for our small group. At the time, the scale-ability to be used with a larger company would not have been possible. The capabilities were not there.
  • At the time, we did not have the functionality to duplicate folders for future use. Wrike has subsequently added that feature now.
  • Having all of the notifications sent to Gmail and added to your calendar can get overwhelming quickly.
Casey Gold profile photo

Likelihood to Renew

Adobe Experience Manager

Adobe Experience Manager 9.0
Based on 5 answers
I'll continue to use this product for many years. Adobe is making it clear they are taking customer feedback seriously and there continues to be growing demand for Adobe CQ implementations. As a developer, I find that there is still lots of room in this platform to try new techniques and really keep our implementations up to par with the latest standards.
Curtis Mortensen profile photo

Wrike

Wrike 7.2
Based on 32 answers
Wrike is a solid tool with zero bugs and is investing a lot in developing their product. With lots of web resources for help and customer support, a Wiki and a blog for project managers, they already build a community of happy users and caught-up users at the same time. I don't see any strong reasons or any shortcoming that could make me leave this community
Cristi Radulian profile photo

Usability

Adobe Experience Manager

Adobe Experience Manager 10.0
Based on 2 answers
I personally feel that AEM is very intuitive to use from an authoring standpoint. The entire CMS was engineered around the author. Everything about AEM is geared to helping authors generate and maintain content. There are ways that tool tips can be customized so that any individual could simply hover over and be guided step by step on how to author web content
Vagner Polund profile photo

Wrike

Wrike 7.9
Based on 8 answers
New users typically have a learning curve before they can fully utilize Wrike. Because it has so much functionality, naturally it takes time to learn.
Jake Neeley profile photo

Reliability and Availability

Adobe Experience Manager

No score
No answers yet
No answers on this topic

Wrike

Wrike 9.0
Based on 8 answers
We've been using since 2011 and rarely experience downtime.
Brandy Roberts, CPA profile photo

Support

Adobe Experience Manager

Adobe Experience Manager 9.0
Based on 1 answer
Its so far the best Content Management System, available in market.
No photo available

Wrike

Wrike 7.2
Based on 3 answers
E-mail ticket support. Not very fast, took an average 16-24 hrs to get a response (some time-zone issues, maybe) . Although Wrike is a SaaS, they also built some desktop tools for Outlook integration (plugin) and at the beginning we had a lot of trouble with it. Finally (after more than a month and a dozen e-mails) there was a release without the bugs that we discovered and then everithing turned in the right direction
Cristi Radulian profile photo

Online Training

Adobe Experience Manager

No score
No answers yet
No answers on this topic

Wrike

Wrike 8.9
Based on 2 answers
Wrike does a great job of provide a breadth of videos for learning their program. This includes a 'getting started' sett of videos along with a collection of more in depth videos to assist more experienced users. Combined with their excellent chat support learning wrike is easy and it includes easy access to best practices.
John Hansknecht profile photo

Implementation

Adobe Experience Manager

Adobe Experience Manager 8.7
Based on 2 answers
Depending on your individual needs, It is really quite simple to create an authoring experience for a website that looks really good. I have been part of many implementations and many teams and have seen many projects that were super successful and others that were not implemented well. AEM has room for a lot of flexibility in the implementation process compared to other CMS like SharePoint
Vagner Polund profile photo

Wrike

Wrike 8.5
Based on 6 answers
Stick with it and resist the temptation to slack in your use of project management software.
Matt Graf profile photo

Alternatives Considered

Adobe Experience Manager

Have used a handful of other content management systems, all of which tend to be either proprietary or freeware -- and the latter presents a security issue. Adobe Experience Manager is easily the most feature-rich content management system I have used, but more features sometimes comes with inconveniences -- taking longer to load when accessing remotely (times out on slow Internet connections), slower taxonomy tagging, etc. It is also the most well-supported system I have used; Adobe is more responsive than most if glitches happen or in response to changes in Google practices for SEO, etc
Courtney E. Howard profile photo

Wrike

Wrike was more of a project management tool going step by step, providing the time spent on a project. Wrike had a lot more to offer, but at a higher price.
Melissa Greenthal profile photo

Return on Investment

Adobe Experience Manager

  • A few clients see no ROI but few are heavily dependent and align on it.. Mixed reviews from clients
Sujeet Sharma profile photo

Wrike

  • The cost was more than the worth our department put into it.
  • Spent $5,000 a year on the product, but it was poorly utilized.
Melissa Greenthal profile photo

Screenshots

Adobe Experience Manager

Pricing Details

Adobe Experience Manager

General

Free Trial
Free/Freemium Version
Premium Consulting/Integration Services
Entry-level set up fee?
No

Adobe Experience Manager Editions & Modules

Adobe Experience Manager
Additional Pricing Details

Wrike

General

Free Trial
Yes
Free/Freemium Version
Yes
Premium Consulting/Integration Services
Yes
Entry-level set up fee?
No

Wrike Editions & Modules

Wrike
Edition
Wrike Free
$0
Wrike Professional
$492
Wrike Enterprise
Request a quote
2. per 5 users/month
Additional Pricing Details
Every premium plan begins with a 15-day trial period to make sure Wrike is right for you.

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