Altova XMLSpy vs. GNU Emacs

Overview
ProductRatingMost Used ByProduct SummaryStarting Price
Altova XMLSpy
Score 9.0 out of 10
N/A
The XMLSpy JSON and XML Editor from Altova is designed to give developers the tools they need to build the most sophisticated applications with its graphical schema designer, code generation, file converters, debuggers, and profilers for working with XSD, XSLT, XQuery, XBRL, and SOAP.N/A
GNU Emacs
Score 8.0 out of 10
N/A
GNU Emacs is described as a free extensible and customizable text editor for the Lisp programming language.N/A
Pricing
Altova XMLSpyGNU Emacs
Editions & Modules
No answers on this topic
No answers on this topic
Offerings
Pricing Offerings
Altova XMLSpyGNU Emacs
Free Trial
NoNo
Free/Freemium Version
NoNo
Premium Consulting/Integration Services
NoNo
Entry-level Setup FeeNo setup feeNo setup fee
Additional Details
More Pricing Information
Community Pulse
Altova XMLSpyGNU Emacs
Top Pros

No answers on this topic

Top Cons
Best Alternatives
Altova XMLSpyGNU Emacs
Small Businesses
BBEdit
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Score 8.2 out of 10
BBEdit
BBEdit
Score 8.2 out of 10
Medium-sized Companies
Vim
Vim
Score 9.7 out of 10
Vim
Vim
Score 9.7 out of 10
Enterprises
Vim
Vim
Score 9.7 out of 10
Vim
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Score 9.7 out of 10
All AlternativesView all alternativesView all alternatives
User Ratings
Altova XMLSpyGNU Emacs
Likelihood to Recommend
8.0
(1 ratings)
8.2
(4 ratings)
Support Rating
-
(0 ratings)
8.2
(2 ratings)
User Testimonials
Altova XMLSpyGNU Emacs
Likelihood to Recommend
Altova
Altova XMLSpy is an excellent tool for creating/designing new XML schemas (XSDs) using a visual layout tool and helps developers and architects work with XML and JSON documents, understand and validate and diagnose issues with XML and JSON documents. It is not well suited for working with other data formats, such as YAML or CSV.
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Open Source
Emacs is best utilized on a Unix system where it can be easily installed and accessed. It allows for quick editing of files on a system whether you are accessing it locally through the console or remotely via an ssh connection. Once users familiarize themselves with the Emacs shortcuts, it becomes a pretty efficient text manipulation program. On a standard Windows computer, it is less likely to use Emacs for code editing, especially if you have a local repository on your host machine.
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Pros
Altova
  • XML schema (XSD) design and maintenance
  • XML document validation
  • XML and JSON document reformatting and pretty-printing
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Open Source
  • GNU Emacs is a text editor that can do almost anything that you want to do with it. It is fairly easy to extend the functionality using Emacs Lisp with a large library available.
  • It can be easily customized using themes as well as custom code to change the look and feel as well as how everything works.
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Cons
Altova
  • Application performance could be improved, especially initial load speed
  • Better support for large document handling (documents hundreds or thousands of megabytes in size)
  • Remove all nagging popups to upgrade
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Open Source
  • Emacs is old, so it's a little crufty and not too easy to pick up and start using. There is a community package called Spacemacs that simplifies a lot of things that you do with Emacs. It is probably better suited to beginners.
  • Sometimes, the choices that were made to integrate certain functionality change the basic models for that functionality. This is seen primarily in the version control system support, where multiple version control systems are supported and "unified" to a standard Emacs-y way of doing things. This can be confusing to the new user not familiar with the Emacs way.
  • Emacs has, as its foundation, a lisp interpreter. This means that the extension language for Emacs is emacs-lisp. Some people find lisp hard to understand and have difficulties writing Emacs extension code, or understanding existing code.
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Support Rating
Altova
No answers on this topic
Open Source
Everything that you need to know about Emacs can be found on the internet. There are many Emacs "cheat sheets" that list out all of the shortcuts for Emacs. There are videos on how to use Emacs. Emacs is easily installed using the standard Linux package managers and can also be easily updated through them as well. There are tutorials on how to customize Emacs to your liking.
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Alternatives Considered
Altova
XMLSpy does not have many capable competitors, it is the market leader and other alternatives do not provide the tools we rely on.
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Open Source
Of course, Vim is a good contender for comparison as well, so I'll include it. I find Emacs much easier to learn, which will help speed up productivity for newer users. It seems much faster than VIM and VSCode, especially under load. It's highly highly customizable, in ways other editors don't stack up against. Its lack of bloat also is a nice addition to a great product.
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Return on Investment
Altova
  • XMLSpy has made us much more efficient when designing new integrations
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Open Source
  • Emacs is free software, there is no cost at all.
  • It has helped tremendously in situations where many, or large, log files need to be searched.
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