What users are saying about
1 Ratings

WordPress

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Top Rated
1945 Ratings
1 Ratings
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Score 3 out of 101

WordPress

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Top Rated
1945 Ratings
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Score 8.3 out of 101

Add comparison

Likelihood to Recommend

Amaxus

Amaxus is well suited as a development platform and content management system for companies who have a dedicated, experienced development team because it has such complex functionality. It is not well suited for companies whose main content updater will be a person with limited development experience, because it is so hard to learn and understand how to use.
Laura Bruss profile photo

WordPress

I believe WordPress is well suited for all websites, except those of major corporations. In my estimation, if you have fewer than 500 employees your website should be on WordPress. The other exception to this rule is if you are a one- or two-man shop and have no technical aptitude. In that case you may want to use a competing CMS software package that is easier to learn.
Ben Beck profile photo

Feature Rating Comparison

Security

Amaxus
9.0
WordPress
8.5
Role-based user permissions
Amaxus
9.0
WordPress
8.5

Web Content Creation

Amaxus
7.4
WordPress
8.2
WYSIWYG editor
Amaxus
5.0
WordPress
7.8
Code quality / cleanliness
Amaxus
6.0
WordPress
8.1
Admin section
Amaxus
6.0
WordPress
8.3
Page templates
Amaxus
10.0
WordPress
7.8
Library of website themes
Amaxus
8.0
WordPress
8.6
Mobile optimization / responsive design
Amaxus
10.0
WordPress
8.6
Publishing workflow
Amaxus
8.0
WordPress
8.4
Form generator
Amaxus
6.0
WordPress
8.0

Web Content Management

Amaxus
7.3
WordPress
8.7
Content taxonomy
Amaxus
7.0
WordPress
8.4
Availability / breadth of extensions
Amaxus
10.0
WordPress
9.2
Community / comment management
Amaxus
5.0
WordPress
9.0
SEO support
Amaxus
WordPress
8.5
Bulk management
Amaxus
WordPress
8.3

Platform & Infrastructure

Amaxus
6.0
WordPress
8.5
Internationalization / multi-language
Amaxus
6.0
WordPress
8.4
API
Amaxus
WordPress
8.5

Pros

  • There is a lot of flexibility and power with what you can do.
  • The client has a lot of power to make changes on their own without needing a development team.
Laura Bruss profile photo
  • One of the best features of WordPress is that it is easy to add, edit and update site content. Anyone who can use wordprocessing software can use WordPress. It's also simple to illustrate your content with images.
  • I particularly enjoy the ability to update site functionality via plugins. Although using too many plugins can slow a WordPress based site down, there are some crucial plugins that improve the basic installation.
  • It's also great that you can change the design easily at a range of price points, using free, freemium or premium themes.
Sharon Hurley Hall profile photo

Cons

  • There is a huge learning curve for developers. All our new website builds were going beyond the timeline because of the learning curve.
  • It is very complex and teaching our clients how to use it required several training sessions.
Laura Bruss profile photo
  • True customization is only possible if you have a really good designer / developer on staff or are willing to pay for a freelancer (i.e., free or premium ($) themes can be rigid)
  • No "out of the box" workflows to speak of (you can find plugins, but you need someone on staff who knows what to look for!)
  • By its nature of being free and open source, there is no true support, only community forums where problems are discussed; this is no substitute for a CMS vendor with excellent customer service (a true test of the real but often unstated value of content management systems)
Christopher Davis profile photo

Likelihood to Renew

No score
No answers yet
No answers on this topic
WordPress9.3
Based on 35 answers
As we become ever more proficient and thorough with our primary CMS — Hannon Hill's Cascade Server — we may begin to consider bringing these satellite blogs into the single product fold. Should that day come, we would no longer need WordPress. Of course, the switch would mean massive SEO problems and a steep learning curve for many users. A staff our size — one designer / developer, one administrative content manager, one content writer, and a former jack-of-all trades oldhead web guy who now fancies himself an expert at digital marketing — might not be able to handle that migration.Having our blogs separate and distinct from our primary web server has proved successful to date. Their separation makes good sense for the niche audiences each academic program requires. And their shared relationships (via links, social media crossovers and XML feeds) only strengthens our brand by showing just how diverse our offerings are.
Christopher Davis profile photo

Usability

No score
No answers yet
No answers on this topic
WordPress9.0
Based on 13 answers
I give this rating because the variety of options out there are pretty endless. They range from novice use all the way to advance, it is tailored for everyone which is why it makes it the number one CMS being used on the internet today.
Mathew Riexinger profile photo

Reliability and Availability

No score
No answers yet
No answers on this topic
WordPress9.5
Based on 3 answers
Anyone can visit WordPress.org and download a fully functional copy of WordPress free of charge. Additionally, WordPress is offered to users as open-source software, which means that anyone can customize the code to create new applications and make these available to other WordPress users.
Martin Aranovitch profile photo

Performance

No score
No answers yet
No answers on this topic
WordPress8.6
Based on 2 answers
Mostly, any performance issues have to do with using too many plugins and these can sometimes slow down the overall performance of your site. It is very tempting to start adding lots of plugins to your WordPress site, however, as there are thousands of great plugins to choose from and so many of them help you do amazing things on your site.If you begin to notice performance issues with your WordPress site (e.g. pages being slow to load), there are ways to optimize the performance of your site, but this requires learning the process. WordPress users can learn how to optimize their WordPress sites by downloading the WPTrainMe WordPress training plugin (WPTrainMe.com) and going through the detailed step-by-step WordPress optimization tutorials.
Martin Aranovitch profile photo

Support

No score
No answers yet
No answers on this topic
WordPress8.0
Based on 10 answers
With WordPress, it's important to differentiate between support for the application itself, and support for third-party components that integrate with WordPress like "plugins" (functionality) and "themes" (web design templates).The WordPress application provides free support via an online community of general users and technical experts (e.g. developers). This support is mostly related to reporting bug fixes, security vulnerabilities, etc., which then get reviewed by the core development team for possible implementation and resolution in the next or a future version upgrade.Most of the problems users experience with WordPress, however, tend to come from third-party plugins and themes causing conflicts or errors. These are developed by a range of different providers, developers, designers, amateur coders, etc. and so the level of support varies. Just like "apps" for mobile devices, there are developers who create robust solutions that play well with everything else on your device and they provide excellent support to users, and there are "fly by the seat of their pants" developers and/or marketers who rush out software that is really "buggy", or they don't have a great customer support structure in place to handle issues and provide solutions quickly (or at all).I gave the rating of 8/10 in this case, because if you focus on the support you can expect to receive for "core" WordPress-related issues only (e.g. bugs or vulnerabilities in the software), there is no dedicated WordPress support "representative" that will directly assist you or manage your case - it's an open source community. And if you focus on the support you can expect to receive for third-party plugins and themes, then that varies greatly depending on who the plugin or theme developer is, and whether you are using a free or premium plugin or theme
Martin Aranovitch profile photo

Online Training

No score
No answers yet
No answers on this topic
WordPress10.0
Based on 1 answer
It is very easy to find online resources to learn how to do just about anything with WordPress.
Lori Berkowitz profile photo

Implementation

No score
No answers yet
No answers on this topic
WordPress6.7
Based on 9 answers
It was much easier than expected! Other than the initial data transfer, it was an amazingly smooth and easy process.
Lori Berkowitz profile photo

Alternatives Considered

I have used an in-house CMS which was very simple and only allowed the user to update very basic templated content, and I have used Sitecore, which is sort of like a middle-of-the-road. Sitecore is great because it allows for the user to have a lot of control over templates and updating content, but it's not so complex that it is very difficult and time-consuming to learn how to use, like Amaxus.
Laura Bruss profile photo
WordPress has become my favorite web-content environment because it resides on the server, requires no offline software installations, get updated regularly at no cost to users, and does not depend on a high degree of technical expertise. No one needs to learn HTML or CSS (style sheets); though if you have these skills you will find WordPress does let you 'run with it' by giving you full access to the back-end if you want it. I've gone from being completely dependent on the sofware and source files I'd stored on my laptop -- and the clients being completely dependent on me for every little edit to their sites ... to being able to deliver a fluid web-presentation environment that allows the client to manage the content, and lets me refine the content from wherever I am -- regardless of what software I might have installed on the nearest computer.
Dan Oblak profile photo

Scalability

No score
No answers yet
No answers on this topic
WordPress10.0
Based on 1 answer
WordPress is completely scalable. You can get started immediately with a very simple "out-of-the box" WordPress installation and then add whatever functionality you need as and when you need it, and continue expanding. Often we will create various WordPress sites on the same domain to handle different aspects of our strategy (e.g. one site for the sales pages, product information and/or a marketing blog, another for delivering products securely through a private membership site, and another for running an affiliate program or other application), and then ties all of these sites together using a common theme and links on each of the site's menus.Additionally, WordPress offers a multisite function that allows organizations and institutions to manage networks of sites managed by separate individual site owners, but centrally administered by the parent organization. You can also expand WordPress into a social networking or community site, forums, etc.The same scalability applies to web design. You can start with a simple design and then scale things up to display sites with amazing visual features, including animations and video effects, sliding images and animated product image galleries, elements that appear and fade from visitor browsers, etc.The scaling possibilities of WordPress are truly endless.
Martin Aranovitch profile photo

Return on Investment

  • It has a negative impact because it put us back on our timelines.
  • It had a negative impact because our customers didn't like the learning curve to use it.
  • It had a negative impact because it caused so much stress among our team to learn it.
Laura Bruss profile photo
  • WordPress helps us create new websites more efficiently. By using a good theme framework, we have an excellent foundation instead of having to start from scratch every time.
  • With WordPress, when we feel it's time to give our site a facelift, it's a simple as choosing and uploading a new theme. We still have to customize it to our branding, but it's much quicker than rebuilding the entire site.
  • Because WordPress is much simpler to use than other web design software, a lot of people are comfortable creating their own sites who might have hired us to do it in the past.
Janet Barclay profile photo

Pricing Details

Amaxus

General
Free Trial
Free/Freemium Version
Premium Consulting/Integration Services
Entry-level set up fee?
No
Additional Pricing Details

WordPress

General
Free Trial
Free/Freemium Version
Premium Consulting/Integration Services
Entry-level set up fee?
No
Additional Pricing Details