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155 Ratings
17 Ratings
155 Ratings
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Score 9 out of 101
17 Ratings
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Score 9.1 out of 101

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Likelihood to Recommend

Amazon S3

S3 is excellent for storing and serving static, media, and uploaded files. Keep your JS, CSS, and images there, as well as user-uploaded images and documents and app-generated documents, and then serve them through configuration in your scalable applications. Elastic Beanstalk and Lambda play very well with S3. If you grow to especially large scale, start managing the regions of your S3 buckets for optimal cloud service.
Corwin Cole profile photo

Backblaze

Backblaze's "set it and forget it' interface is ideal for home users. In addition, the $50/year pricing is very competitive. Most business should find Backblaze as a very good backup solution, but in cases where a backup archive needs to be kept indefinitely, alternative solutions should be looked at (specifically CrashPlan - though it is significantly more expensive at $10/month).
Aaron Pinsker profile photo

Pros

  • Scalable
  • Reliable
  • Well documented
Matthew Gardner profile photo
  • Backblaze utilizes a native app across platforms vs. a javascript app you find with other backup services (CrashPlan being one of them). Native apps function better and have a better user interface than comparable javascript apps.
  • Backblaze has an intuitive interface that automatically backs everything up from your computer but allows you to easily exclude items you don't want or need to backup (applications, system files, etc.).
  • Backblaze has a built-in bandwidth cap and monitor allowing you to limit how much data is backed up on a daily basis to prevent going over ISP data caps or utilizing all of your upload bandwidth.
Aaron Pinsker profile photo

Cons

  • Hard to use
  • Not for non-developers
  • Bad online UI
Matthew Gardner profile photo
  • Occasionally, if you've made lots of changes to your files, Backblaze will kick into action and slow down your computer. Normally you don't notice this but sometimes it does become a resource hog. But... in the latest versions, you can simply pause the running backup or restrict backups to run only off-hours.
  • One feature I'd like to see added, the ability to pay for long term storage regardless if you connect your drive / device every 30 days. That's their cut-off time frame - if you've backed up a computer - but don't connect it to the internet once very 30 days - they actually delete all the data stored for that device. They give you plenty of warnings - but it'd be nice to have an option to pay for unlimited or longer retention.
  • I'd also like to see an easier way of "swapping" a device inside of their system. For instance, if you upgrade your computer, you can't convert your old computer into your new one and simply append data to what is already stored. You have to start from scratch and your old data is probably lost for good after 30 days unless you keep the computer around some how and connect it once per month.
William Levins profile photo

Usability

No score
No answers yet
No answers on this topic
Backblaze10.0
Based on 1 answer
As stated in my review, Backblaze simply works and works simply. You install it. It runs silently in the background storing and safeguarding all your computer data remotely. You seldom notice it until you've lost something you need - then you can quickly find it online using their interface and restore it - which is what's really important.
William Levins profile photo

Alternatives Considered

S3 is still being used within our org but we have dialed it back heavily due to the inexpensive competing product CloudFlare offers. CloudFlare is basically free for the same functionality and the company has matured to the point where it is reliable and scalable, plus CDN distribution is their bread and butter on top of that. If we were starting over today I'd start with CloudFlare.
Matthew Gardner profile photo
Having been a customer of Dropbox for many years now, I feel like I have a good grasp on what the company offers. I have friends and colleagues that use Dropbox as a pseudo-backup system. I think this is a huge mistake. Go with a company like Backblaze that specializes and focuses on whole system cloud backups
Chris Tuley profile photo

Return on Investment

  • Simple hosting
  • Fast to get up and running
  • Easy integration
  • Reliable/no downtime
Matthew Gardner profile photo
  • I think it saves IT a lot of time porting users over
No photo available

Pricing Details

Amazon S3

General
Free Trial
Free/Freemium Version
Premium Consulting/Integration Services
Entry-level set up fee?
No
Additional Pricing Details

Backblaze

General
Free Trial
Free/Freemium Version
Premium Consulting/Integration Services
Entry-level set up fee?
No
Additional Pricing Details