Amazon Web Services

310 Ratings
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Score 8.7 out of 101

IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS)

61 Ratings
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Score 7.6 out of 101

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Likelihood to Recommend

Amazon Web Services

Amazon Web Services is well suited for companies that don't want to have deal with physical infrastructure and want a high level of security and availability. In most cases Amazon Web Services is a great option for most, but may not be an option if you have met the tipping point of physical cost vs. Amazon Web Services cost. It may end up being a better option in the long run to manage the infrastructure yourself if the cost per hour of Amazon Web Services is greater than what you can provide if your level of availability is equal to or greater than Amazon Web Services.
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IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS)

Well Suited:- Development of information architecture/library. It enables better classification/taxonomy, leading to more intuitive findability.- Dialog design and content retrieval for virtual agents. (e.g. a virtual agent whose content offerings are not hard-coded into the response fields, but instead require crawling/drawing from other pages/libraries)Not Well Suited:- Annotation/labeling/clustering of information that will be retrieved using a different search/query service.
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Feature Rating Comparison

Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS)

Amazon Web Services
8.4
IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS)
Service-level Agreement (SLA) uptime
Amazon Web Services
8.7
IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS)
Dynamic scaling
Amazon Web Services
8.9
IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS)
Elastic load balancing
Amazon Web Services
9.0
IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS)
Pre-configured templates
Amazon Web Services
7.7
IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS)
Monitoring tools
Amazon Web Services
7.9
IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS)
Pre-defined machine images
Amazon Web Services
7.9
IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS)
Operating system support
Amazon Web Services
8.5
IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS)
Security controls
Amazon Web Services
8.2
IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS)

Platform-as-a-Service

Amazon Web Services
IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS)
6.9
Ease of building user interfaces
Amazon Web Services
IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS)
10.0
Scalability
Amazon Web Services
IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS)
6.8
Platform management overhead
Amazon Web Services
IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS)
8.0
Workflow engine capability
Amazon Web Services
IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS)
5.3
Platform access control
Amazon Web Services
IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS)
10.0
Services-enabled integration
Amazon Web Services
IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS)
6.7
Development environment creation
Amazon Web Services
IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS)
6.5
Development environment replication
Amazon Web Services
IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS)
6.4
Issue monitoring and notification
Amazon Web Services
IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS)
5.3
Issue recovery
Amazon Web Services
IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS)
4.6
Upgrades and platform fixes
Amazon Web Services
IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS)
6.5

Pros

  • The ability to scale vertically and horizontally easily.
  • The ability to get server notifications
  • Ease of use within the AWS GUI
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  • Flexible development environments available, all interoperative, from Docker-based to apiconnect-based. We can use several repo-sites and keep code versions well tracked and reclaimable on any of them. The networked nature of the systems means we can develop from a world wide basis of engineers and programmers, although right now we have one Senior Software Engineer and a couple of coders, in different countries.
  • Datasources can be connected from anywhere.
  • Mobile Endpoint Security, and Server Security (meeting or exceeding 27001 and 27002) with IBM, represent resellable value to us.
  • We are a fledgling company, but as soon as we are able to afford to use the Blockchains offered by IBM, we will do so, because we can eliminate one entire class of financial (or any trust/transaction-based) risk this way.
  • With the use of Cordova we can code our front ends once and cover the web, Android and iOS platforms together with minimal fuss to tailor the code.
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Cons

  • Better user support would be nice. It seems hard to find help when you need something specific from an Amazon employee.
  • Even though the prices are set up for enterprise they do seem high for small to mid level businesses, compared to other alternatives.
  • It would be nice to be able to have some type of DB security built in to the EC2s or as a default.
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  • Sometimes the API Connect GUIs don't cleanly disengage after attaching models or updating schema and it is hard to know what has been written successfully and which (if any) models or tables were missed. I shouldn't have to manually check through a list of 377 models to find the ones in and out of a list on either models, folder or database tables. Printing a summary even in logs which did a "diff" sort of thing between 'task-set' and 'task-completed' (referring to attaching models or updating schema as tasks here as 'tasks').
  • Provide access to Postgres Database in Sydney datacentre for Australia.
  • Clearer documentation around setting up a secure (referring to SSL and certificate setup here) server on eg, chubby1.au-sydney.mybluemix.net.
  • Allow a ramp in pricing onto the Blockchains. We will not be able to afford it until quite a few years into production, even if we launch successfully.
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Likelihood to Renew

Amazon Web Services9.4
Based on 10 answers
AWS has met our requirements, including the pricing. There is no need to move off of AWS at this time.
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No score
No answers yet
No answers on this topic

Usability

Amazon Web Services9.0
Based on 3 answers
The management console is the weak part of the service in my experience. It is adequate but slow.
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No score
No answers yet
No answers on this topic

Reliability and Availability

Amazon Web Services9.0
Based on 1 answer
Availability is very good, with the exception of occasional spectacular outages.
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No score
No answers yet
No answers on this topic

Performance

AWS does not provide the raw performance that you can get by building your own custom infrastructure. However, it is often the case that the benefits of specialized, high-performance hardware do not necessarily outweigh the significant extra cost and risk. Performance as perceived by the user is very different from raw throughput.
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No answers on this topic

Support

Amazon Web Services3.0
Based on 3 answers
Neutral, no experience with either.
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No score
No answers yet
No answers on this topic

Implementation

Amazon Web Services10.0
Based on 3 answers
The API's were very well documented and was Janova's main point of entry into the services.
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No score
No answers yet
No answers on this topic

Alternatives Considered

We also looked at Rackspace but was attracted to AWS by the breadth of services available at comparable cost and reliability.
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IBM was making very slow moves, and almost appeared to be shrinking compared to the explosion of AWS, until the new visual overhaul made the service very, very easy to use, and honestly, is my current go-to service for cloud services. Lets be honest here also, one of the BIG reasons for using the cloud is to have an environment capable of rapidly and dynamically adjusting to handle any user influx, so why should I put time and energy, let alone base my entire cloud solution on configuring and deploying something to exact specifications, which I will then want to have change dynamically? I would personally rather focus just on what I need to make "my" software work. IBM does have downsides, such as a possibility of vendor lock-in, and needing to learn new technologies, but once invested, those are the areas that will pay off, and now that BlueMix is easy to use, I think it is going to put a lot of fear into AWS and Microsoft Azure.
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Return on Investment

  • Resource availability of free-tier resources is very low compared to needs before an application can become potentially profitable.
  • AWS requires less time to set up and configure than other comparable services, but not better than all services.
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  • Difficult to assess at this point.
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Pricing Details

Amazon Web Services

General
Free Trial
Free/Freemium Version
Premium Consulting/Integration Services
Entry-level set up fee?
No
Additional Pricing Details

Amazon Web Services More Information

IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS)

General
Free Trial
Yes
Free/Freemium Version
Yes
Premium Consulting/Integration Services
Yes
Entry-level set up fee?
Optional
Additional Pricing Details
https://www.ibm.com/cloud/pricing Enterprise pricing is available upon request.

IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS) More Information