What users are saying about
89 Ratings
33 Ratings
89 Ratings
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Score 8.5 out of 101
33 Ratings
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Score 7.9 out of 101

Likelihood to Recommend

Ansible

Great for automating groups of servers and ensuring updates are pushed to all of them (simultaneously if needed). It's hard to manage large groups of servers, and this tool makes it almost too simple. If there is only one server that is unique from the others, Ansible will not be as useful, but can still help track your changes.
Dylan Cauwels profile photo

CircleCI

CircleCI is perfect for a CI/CD pipeline for an app using a standard build process. It'll take more work for a complex build process, but should still be up to the task unless you need a lot of integrations with other tools. If you have a big team and can spare someone to focus full time on just the CI/CD tools, maybe something like Jenkins is better, but if you're just looking to get your app built, tested, and delivered without a huge amount of effort, CircleCI is probably your preferred tool.
John Grosjean profile photo

Pros

Ansible

  • Automating any machine-level processes that you need to do to set up an environment.
  • Great for sending out consistent changes to a group of servers.
Dylan Cauwels profile photo

CircleCI

  • GitHub integration is seamless. Never had a problem with it missing commits.
  • Robust test environment. I used Travis in the past but tests would sporadically time out for no clear reason, haven't had that happen with CircleCI
  • Poweful YAML-based configuration in the GitHub repo itself. I don't like CI tools like Semaphore that push you into managing your CI/CD through a web UI, I prefer managing a config file and never having to log in to the CI tool.
Valeri Karpov profile photo

Cons

Ansible

  • There are conflicting stories on how best to organize a role's structure. Old documentation exists, and as Ansible has grown directions have pivoted a bit. This should be trued up.
  • Pull-based Ansible is a compelling use case. Ansible should come up with a pattern which supports this configuration.
  • How to integrate ServerSpec infrastructure integration testing is sorely lacking. Ansible should curate practices and docs around this.
No photo available

CircleCI

  • Bits of the caching configuration were initially a bit confusing.
  • Took a bit of time to get git submodules working properly. But that's to be expected as it's not a common denominator for most Git repositories.
  • Running local builds for diagnosing bugs can be a bit cumbersome. The docker image I recall was very much a black box, and was unclear how to interpret why I got the results I did. But again, expected. If it were not a black box, it would be trivial for other vendors to clone their functionality.
No photo available

Performance

Ansible

Ansible 8.4
Based on 5 answers
Ansible has always operated as we expected it to. It does require digging into the configuration documentation at times, especially when using some of the modules, but that's just a small learning curve. Once it's set up it runs great. We've not had any issues.
John Reeve profile photo

CircleCI

CircleCI 8.3
Based on 3 answers
CircleCI performs quickly. The web interface looks great and is very easy to understand/use. We have experienced 3-5 CIrcleCI outages in the last few months where Circle was unresponsive for a few hours, but other than that it has proven to be reliable. The integrations with Circle (GitHub, Slack, DataDog) have all worked pretty seamlessly for us.
Gabriel Samaroo profile photo

Alternatives Considered

Ansible

I've said this before, but Ansible is a great declarative orchestrator. One thing that is both good and bad about it is that it has no store about the state of the gear it manages. With dynamic inventory, I either have to realize facts for my entire fleet or rely on prior runs writing metadata to my cloud instances and subsequent runs referencing said information from the cloud API. Contrast this to Chef which has a solr instance which lets me store information about node objects which is updated on successful converges. That store is always available for recipe use and other business processes.
No photo available

CircleCI

Not having to manage / deal with a Jenkins server is fantastic. I don't have much personally against Jenkins. I've set up and run a Jenkins server before. It's just complexity that doesn't really have much to do with the business beyond getting our software to our customers. My time is better spent on our core value, hence why having CI/CD as a service is such a great value.
No photo available

Return on Investment

Ansible

  • Excellent ROI, in that it's free and easy to set up.
Russ Taylor profile photo

CircleCI

  • Don't have to bother rolling my own CI/CD. Saves time.
  • Saves money as I can operate on the free tier without hosting my own CI/CD environment(s).
  • Simple configuration compared to other competitors.
No photo available

Pricing Details

Ansible

General

Free Trial
Free/Freemium Version
Premium Consulting/Integration Services
Entry-level set up fee?
No
Additional Pricing Details

CircleCI

General

Free Trial
Free/Freemium Version
Premium Consulting/Integration Services
Entry-level set up fee?
No
Additional Pricing Details

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