96 Ratings
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Top Rated
134 Ratings
96 Ratings
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Score 8.5 out of 101

System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM)

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Top Rated
134 Ratings
<a href='https://www.trustradius.com/static/about-trustradius-scoring' target='_blank' rel='nofollow noopener noreferrer'>trScore algorithm: Learn more.</a>
Score 7.9 out of 101

Likelihood to Recommend

Ansible

Great for automating groups of servers and ensuring updates are pushed to all of them (simultaneously if needed). It's hard to manage large groups of servers, and this tool makes it almost too simple. If there is only one server that is unique from the others, Ansible will not be as useful, but can still help track your changes.
Dylan Cauwels profile photo

System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM)

I know many people have a great experience with System Center Configuration Manager, but it is not suitable for organizations that cannot commit a significant amount of time to configuration and deployment. For example, my organization uses Jamf Pro for Mac management. It took me a couple of days to configure every setting needed for an adequate Mac deployment. System Center Configuration Manager took way longer. Most MSPs in our area do not want to deal with it due to its complexity either. A big organization will find the product more suitable, as configuration tasks are the same whether an organization has 1000 or 10,000 computers, the installation will be more useful with scale. In my case, trying to deploy System Center Configuration Manager as a personal project while doing other tasks was not a success.
No photo available

Pros

Ansible

  • Agentless. For our implementation, this is the single biggest factor. If we have to touch the machine and install an agent before we can start managing it, that's already too much effort and slows us down.
  • Re-entrant. This is not unique to Ansible, but certainly a huge improvement over custom scripts and such. Because it's such a huge effort to make scripts re-entrant, most of our scripts did not allow an elegant way to recover on failure. Manually cleaning up the half-attempt and re-trying is still too cumbersome, and being able to just re-run Ansible is a great improvement!
  • Infrastructure as code. This is new to Ansible, and there are still a few minor bugs with their AWS modules, but it's been a huge help being able to define our infrastructure in an Ansible playbook, commit it to source control, and use one tool for all our DevOps tasks.
John Grosjean profile photo

System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM)

  • You can run an inventory of your assets, from PCs to laptops, grouping them by location, type, department, all tight to your own Active Directory. That saves a lot of time when you need to report the status of hardware and software. You can even manage alerts to inform you when some hardware change has happened, which could possibly lead to a robbery.
  • You can centralize software distribution, controlling what kind of software is available for your organization, and here's the most important part: you can give end-users the power to install/remove that software by themselves. That way, you can avoid a ticket to your service desk and potentially save money on those tickets too.
  • Also, due to the distributed architecture of the product, you can deploy a component of the system in each remote site you have. Thanks to that, you can avoid using the bandwidth of the remote site, which usually is already limited, to download software/updates to each PC locally. You just need to download once for the distribution point it will deliver locally. You can also avoid the risk of having your local WAN to be contested by some unexpected outdated PC that was just connected to your network.
Eduardo Viero profile photo

Cons

Ansible

  • Unlike Chef, Ansible employes a Push methodology rather than Pull. We found that this doesn't scale well for us, thus we had to consider using Ansible Tower in order to scale.
  • Ansible's free training and tutorials do no provide as much depth and ease for first time users trying it out for the first time.
  • From the limited experience we have had with Ansible Tower, the UI is not very user friendly. There's a lot of bells and whistles that can prove o be overwhelming at times.
No photo available

System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM)

  • Complexity of initial deployment requires 6 to 8 months of planning and preparation. This is one of those projects that will take a year to implement.
  • Managing user roles in the system can be made easier with use of templates and a more robust role management tool.
  • System and agent upgrades as well as patching the SCCM back-end systems should be easier.
  • Offer a hybrid cloud-based solution with pre-built models and templates for faster deployment and appeal to mid-size enterprises.
No photo available

Likelihood to Renew

Ansible

No score
No answers yet
No answers on this topic

System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM)

System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM) 9.0
Based on 2 answers
Mascom Wireless is a Microsoft shop and SCCM has proved to be helpful in keeping our Microsoft products up to date every month without fail. We also have a Microsoft Enterprise Agreement which we renewed for three years ending 2022. The remote access utility works wonders for the organisation and have saved travel bills including subsistance allowance.We have been able to fulfill security audits both internal and external. We have been able to keep a robust inventory of our computer assets and nothing falls of the cracks
Junie Johwa profile photo

Usability

Ansible

No score
No answers yet
No answers on this topic

System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM)

System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM) 6.2
Based on 4 answers
It leaves a lot to be desired from a user-friendly experience. You must do a lot of Googling or guide reading to get it to do what you want. It has all the power to do pretty much whatever you need, but actually implementing it is not laid out in the simplest way.
Adam Martin profile photo

Performance

Ansible

Ansible 8.4
Based on 5 answers
Ansible is very friendly to start with. With just a few configurations, you have full management to your servers. You can configure it and implement it in seconds. You can also set up a cron job to make sure it gets implemented. It suits our need perfectly. Support can be a bit hard.
No photo available

System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM)

System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM) 7.6
Based on 14 answers
The product is great, however, due to its heavy weight, the performance of the management console and the Imaging mechanism is not the best it could be. I understand that it also depends on the environment where SCCM, SQL and other related services are deployed, but these are all Microsoft services that should be working as a single system with the best performance ever. And, unfortunately, they are not.
Valery Mezentsau profile photo

Support

Ansible

No score
No answers yet
No answers on this topic

System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM)

System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM) 8.0
Based on 4 answers
Our organization does not pay for Microsoft support, so it was not used in regards to System Center Configuration Manager. Microsoft documentation for the product is good, but there is a lot to read, as it has a large number of features. Organizations with access to Microsoft support will have a better experience with the product than I did.
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Implementation

Ansible

No score
No answers yet
No answers on this topic

System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM)

System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM) 8.5
Based on 2 answers
Work with a "test group" of users who you have a good relationship with so that when things don't work properly they understand!Work with your partner nicely without forcing things especially timelines as you are bound to make mistakes and create oversights in the projectManagement can also interfere with the implementation (which can cause delays) if you make too many mistakes which takes me back to having a "test group" where you have good relations
Junie Johwa profile photo

Alternatives Considered

Ansible

Ansible is sufficient for our purposes because our configurations are relatively simple. Chef and Puppet would work better for more complex configurations. Also, our applications are deployed using Docker which simplifies our configuration requirements. An organization with more complex configurations would find Chef or Puppet suits their needs better.
Chien Huey profile photo

System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM)

I am going to speak strictly on imaging here as this is what I have used System Center Configuration Manager for more than anything. I used SCCM at two companies that I worked for before my current company, and compared to the other software imaging suites that I have used, which were Landesk and Ghost, SCCM took much longer to deploy the same sized image. SCCM does work, and if you happen to work at a company that is willing to spend that much to purchase it, then take the time to learn all of the features, and configure it as you need it, but for me, SCCM is not my first choice and I am a lifelong Microsoft fan.
Michael Timms profile photo

Return on Investment

Ansible

  • We have been able to deploy solutions to client issues without impacting uptime.
  • Most system administration tasks have been automated so I am now free to work on architectural improvements or customer support.
  • Our customer support has improved thanks to Ansible as it has allowed me more time away from repetitive system activities so I may assist with customer questions and application testing.
James McCoy profile photo

System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM)

  • Positive Impact #1: Leveraging the Remote Access feature, we can simply remotely connect to a users workstation to assist with any issues they may encounter. We have multiple locations, so it is a huge time saver in troubleshooting end user issues.
  • Positive Impact #2: ROI is different for everyone, but ours has been positive in that we dont have to travel back and fourth between building as often to assist users. This saves time, gas and ultimately money.
  • Positive Impact #3: After you have deployed all the SCCM agents SCCM will start performing its magic. Inventory of your hardware and software is readily available in fully customizable reports that you can provide upper management for tech refreshes, etc. We also use the reports to ensure we have the right licensing installed vs. the licensing we have purchased.
Joe Spradlin profile photo

Pricing Details

Ansible

General

Free Trial
Free/Freemium Version
Premium Consulting/Integration Services
Entry-level set up fee?
No

System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM)

General

Free Trial
Free/Freemium Version
Premium Consulting/Integration Services
Entry-level set up fee?
No

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