What users are saying about
51 Ratings
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Score 7.5 out of 101
24 Ratings
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Score 7.7 out of 101

Likelihood to Recommend

Apache Subversion

Subversion solves our software versioning problem by providing tools for conflict resolution when doing collaborative work on the same files and projects. We use it with TortoiseSVN and it works great for some of our projects with smaller teams. However, we have a need to make code reviews more and it is a little more difficult to do that in SVN, compared to Bitbucket and Git.
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IBM Rational ClearCase

IBM Rational ClearCase might be better suited for a smaller / simpler code base. Larger code bases really slow it down... but then again there are better alternatives out there for source control
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Pros

Apache Subversion

  • Version control - it's what it's designed for.
  • Modifiable - It only takes a little bit of knowledge of a scripting language (I used Windows BAT files calling Perl scripts) to extend capabilities, like the aforementioned integration with Redmine.
  • Back end administration- It's a breeze. There's very little work involved in terms of administering it once you've got it installed on a server, and even setting that up isn't bad.
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IBM Rational ClearCase

  • Rational ClearCase is excellent for handling versioning and branching. No other tool I've used has the depth that ClearCase has when it comes to handling complex branching scenarios and identifying where certain versions of particular files are within a particular configuration.
  • Rational ClearCase handles parallel development of many dependent applications really well.
  • The use of ClearCase Views to switch between projects and configurations is extremely convenient as opposed to the local workstation model of the competitors.
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Cons

Apache Subversion

  • At times, locking problems can be difficult to solve. This normally happens you make a mistake, like attempting to update a folder that has running executables within it. Often times, you can just unlock a parent folder and you' are all set, but on more than one occasion I have had to recheckout a folder because I could not resolve the lock, even after rebooting.
  • Looking up the history of a file can be very slow, taking several minutes, especially when looking at the history of an entire folder.
  • Novice users of subversion often make the mistake of dragging folders in Windows that are managed by subversion. This does not cause the folder to move in the svn repository, which can lead to serious confusion why a user's folder structure does not seem the synchronize correctly with other users. To an advanced user, this can be a very useful feature, but absolutely hell for the novice.
  • I have not found any third-party tools yet that let me visualize the commits for a codebase, particularly across branches. This may be partially because of the slow history I already pointed out, but I believe it's because I have not been willing to even look at the multi-thousand dollar code management solutions I have seen advertisements for in the past.
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IBM Rational ClearCase

  • Extremely buggy.
  • Sometimes the repository gets locked for no reason.
  • Slow.
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Likelihood to Renew

Apache Subversion

Apache Subversion 3.1
Based on 2 answers
While there are interesting alternatives, such a GIT, Subversion has been a breath of fresh air compared to its predecessors like CVS or Microsoft Source Safe (now called Team Foundation Server). Its ease of use and high adoption rate is going to keep me using this product for years to come.
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IBM Rational ClearCase

No score
No answers yet
No answers on this topic

Alternatives Considered

Apache Subversion

I find Perforce to be a little more cumbersome to use than Subversion. And it is NOT free or open source.
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IBM Rational ClearCase

If development is centrallized to one location and your company releases hundreds of customized versions of your software per year, then ClearCase is the best tool for managing the complexity of multiple versions of customized software. If your company has globally distributed development, then I'd recommend Team Foundation Server over ClearCase. If your organization uses Agile Methodologies, then I'd recommend TFS with GIT.
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Return on Investment

Apache Subversion

  • I cannot speak on ROI but Apache Subversion is definitely the best version control tool for a project of any size. It serves the user's purpose in a complete satisfactory way.
  • As it is open source, there is no need to spend any amount on it, which makes it an even more easier choice.
  • The most negative impact Apache Subversion can have on you is that you will not want to use any other version control tool after using it.
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IBM Rational ClearCase

  • Managed code versioning for many years.
  • Only one person can edit code at a time - slows processing down.
  • IBM is an expensive product to support.
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Pricing Details

Apache Subversion

General

Free Trial
Free/Freemium Version
Premium Consulting/Integration Services
Entry-level set up fee?
No

IBM Rational ClearCase

General

Free Trial
Free/Freemium Version
Premium Consulting/Integration Services
Entry-level set up fee?
No

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