Carbonite Safe vs. Dropbox

Overview
ProductRatingMost Used ByProduct SummaryStarting Price
Carbonite Safe
Score 10.0 out of 10
N/A
Carbonite Safe is a personal cloud backup solution offered on pricing tiers to backup a single computer to multiple computers, to an insfrastructure consisting of endpoints and servers. Users of the former Mozy product (an online data backup service which allows users to back up their hard drive and, in the event of a computer catastrophe, perform a full restore of all files) are migrated to Carbonite Safe. Mozy was acquired by Carbonite from Dell in March 2018.
$83.99
per year
Dropbox
Score 8.0 out of 10
N/A
Dropbox is a service for file syncing and sharing, or for cloud storage.
$11.99
per month
Pricing
Carbonite SafeDropbox
Editions & Modules
Basic
$83.99
per year
Plus
$119.99
per year
Prime
$149.99
per year
Plus
$11.99
per month
Family
$19.99
per month
Basic
Free
Offerings
Pricing Offerings
Carbonite SafeDropbox
Free Trial
NoNo
Free/Freemium Version
NoNo
Premium Consulting/Integration Services
NoNo
Entry-level Setup FeeNo setup feeNo setup fee
Additional Details
More Pricing Information
Community Pulse
Carbonite SafeDropbox
Considered Both Products
Carbonite Safe
Chose Carbonite Safe
Amazon Cloud Drive deleted TONS of photos I backed up years ago. I'll never trust it again. I liked Dropbox better than Box b/c of its interface and intuitiveness. Google Drive is easy but doesn't back up automatically.
Dropbox
Chose Dropbox
We briefly considered Mozy and Carbonite as solutions against Dropbox, but their focus is backup first. To be honest, I'm not sure if either even offers a file sync feature any longer. They didn't solve the problem that Dropbox does in an elegant way. Apple iCloud is very …
Top Pros
Top Cons
Features
Carbonite SafeDropbox
File Sharing & Management
Comparison of File Sharing & Management features of Product A and Product B
Carbonite Safe
-
Ratings
Dropbox
7.0
111 Ratings
Versioning00 Ratings6.895 Ratings
Video files00 Ratings6.9103 Ratings
Audio files00 Ratings7.199 Ratings
Document collaboration00 Ratings7.4102 Ratings
Access control00 Ratings7.1109 Ratings
File search00 Ratings7.1110 Ratings
Device sync00 Ratings6.8106 Ratings
Cloud Storage Security & Administration
Comparison of Cloud Storage Security & Administration features of Product A and Product B
Carbonite Safe
-
Ratings
Dropbox
7.2
107 Ratings
User and role management00 Ratings6.899 Ratings
File organization00 Ratings7.7106 Ratings
Device management00 Ratings7.193 Ratings
Cloud Storage Platform
Comparison of Cloud Storage Platform features of Product A and Product B
Carbonite Safe
-
Ratings
Dropbox
7.3
111 Ratings
Performance00 Ratings7.5111 Ratings
Reliability00 Ratings7.7111 Ratings
Storage Reports00 Ratings6.585 Ratings
User Ratings
Carbonite SafeDropbox
Likelihood to Recommend
9.0
(11 ratings)
7.3
(130 ratings)
Likelihood to Renew
5.9
(2 ratings)
1.0
(20 ratings)
Usability
-
(0 ratings)
8.6
(23 ratings)
Availability
-
(0 ratings)
9.0
(2 ratings)
Performance
-
(0 ratings)
8.7
(10 ratings)
Support Rating
10.0
(4 ratings)
7.3
(60 ratings)
Online Training
-
(0 ratings)
9.0
(1 ratings)
Implementation Rating
-
(0 ratings)
10.0
(4 ratings)
Product Scalability
-
(0 ratings)
8.0
(1 ratings)
User Testimonials
Carbonite SafeDropbox
Likelihood to Recommend
Carbonite, an OpenText company
Mozy Pro is a great fit, especially for small businesses that don't want to pursue a very large number of licenses, and don't have many TB of data to backup. The price per user is reasonable, and well within the budget of smaller businesses needing workstation backup solutions. For larger enterprises, there are other products that provide a lot more storage and better performance. We found Code42's product to be better for larger data backup needs.
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Dropbox
Dropbox is used in a variety of ways at our workplace. Sharing documents with our team on the go is made possible by Dropbox. Once a file is uploaded to Dropbox, team members can view and discuss it immediately. Some of the new features make it easier for us to keep things organized and maintain continuity during our meetings. We will store large files on it and send them to clients or suppliers via a link. A sales campaign's data is also stored in Dropbox. For example, it enables our marketing team to work on various sales campaigns from any location.
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Pros
Carbonite, an OpenText company
  • Performance Settings: Mozy can be configured to run very smoothly in the background with minimal performance degradation. It provides network bandwidth throttling, backup speed, and backing up only when idle option. From my own experience I usually do not notice any performance degradation when Mozy is running. Of course a good network or Internet connection is vital.
  • Restore: file restoration is simple and intuitive. The user can restore logical backup sets (e.g. all photos) or file based (select the folder or file you want restored). Files and folders can be restored with the latest version or earlier version. Rename and overwrite options provide further flexibility.
  • Sync: with Mozy you can sync file across multiple devices including mobile. Access to your corporate files via smart phone is a secure manner is very useful.
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Dropbox
  • We are transferring large files and multiple files with various internal and external parties due to the ease of sharing files and folders.
  • Smart sync, so you don't have to worry about device space and search large file batches quickly.
  • Synchronizing a data file across organizations without the user having to do anything other than work is a significant benefit of cloud computing.
  • Allowing only the people who need it to have access is a huge perk and works well with other enterprise software.
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Cons
Carbonite, an OpenText company
  • I would like to see backups for programs that I have installed on my machine. For instance I use Adobe CS6 and MS Office among other things. Instead of having to reinstall all these programs on my new machine, I would love for Mozy to be able to save the programs somehow and I can restore them as they were on the old machine with the same almost one-click process that I use to restore files. Basically like Time Machine, but for Windows.
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Dropbox
  • At one point 2 gigs [were] deemed enough for the "Free" version of Dropbox and its competition. However as even the most simple picture from a phone gets larger, 2 gigs might no longer be enough. Might want to increase the free size to adjust for file size inflation.
  • Dropbox's app is very presumptive of updating itself every time you log on to a system that it's installed on. I know that's a feature you can turn off, but the assumption to turn that feature on by default is annoying.
  • Dropbox could use a phone app function that would initiate a download to a designated computer hard drive. It would eliminate having to see the file on your phone, go to your computer, turn it on and then download the file.
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Likelihood to Renew
Carbonite, an OpenText company
For the clients we have using this service, we fully plan to renew the subscription. However, that may change as our client's business grows and they have a need to add visualization and other server types to their environment
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Dropbox
Dropbox is a user-friendly, easy tool which requires little to no skill and they offer a free version with a good amount of storage available. There are other file sharing tools available however at a cost. Dropbox free version I have used for years and it serves every purpose I need.
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Usability
Carbonite, an OpenText company
No answers on this topic
Dropbox
Dropbox is dead simple to us since right out of the box, it creates a folder on your PC and anything added to it gets synced to the cloud and any other device signed into that account. You can then dive deeper into permissions, version history, etc. Overall though, the minimalist approach is welcome since not everyone we work with is highly technical and that itself saves us time and money. Many of our colleagues already use Dropbox for their personal cloud so no training is required when using it at work other than going over our own company guidelines and best practices.
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Performance
Carbonite, an OpenText company
No answers on this topic
Dropbox
Dropbox is really useful, you can access any file from anywhere and you can upload and even edit files online, but, sometimes it can be slow. Downloading, uploading, and syncing is a bit slow, it can take several minutes. Furthermore, the search engine for large amounts of data can be slow too and it is not powerful.
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Support Rating
Carbonite, an OpenText company
I usually find what I need to know by looking in the Carbonite knowledge base online. We haven't had any major problems, usually we just need clarification on a point or more details about a feature so we look it up. We haven't had to call in for help in quite awhile.
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Dropbox
It has not been necessary to go to customer support lately, since everything works perfectly. However, I must add that at the beginning when I started using Dropbox, and I had any doubts about how it worked, customer support was always attentive and found the best solutions effectively.
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Implementation Rating
Carbonite, an OpenText company
No answers on this topic
Dropbox
I needed to stay current in improving my daily operations. Dropbox
was suggested to me by a former colleague two-years ago and I've been using it just fine ever since.
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Alternatives Considered
Carbonite, an OpenText company
Carbonite Safe is a great solution for startup entities. It ranks nicely with Acronis and Carbonite Server Backup. Carbonite Safe is very good for backing up workstations including home computers. This is a good solution for home office users. Acronis does image level backups better than Mozy / Carbonite Safe whereas Barracuda Backup is a much more expensive (but worthwhile) investment. Barracuda Backup includes a physical BDR appliance.
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Dropbox
Of all the options we tried, Dropbox was at the top in terms of performance, reliability, and features. Nextcloud is a self-hosted solution, and is the system preferred by our IT department — mainly because it is free or has no annual subscription cost. However, it's UI is clunky compared to Dropbox's. It didn't sync files as well, couldn't preview some file types, and had other technical problems. Even though it was locally hosted, it was slower than Dropbox. Google Drive is another service we used in tandem with the others. It is great for collaborative documents and spreadsheets, and does OK with some other types of projects. But for file sharing it didn't work as well, and our plan didn't allow for enough storage space compared to the other options. For my personal home use, I use pCloud. It works great, and has an optional lifetime purchase plan: You have perpetual use for a one-time payment. I like that you can sync specific subfolders to a computer, but it is more tedious or technical to set up compared to Dropbox.
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Scalability
Carbonite, an OpenText company
No answers on this topic
Dropbox
I can add and add a tin files large files and Dropbox is still working great!
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Return on Investment
Carbonite, an OpenText company
  • Mozy is very affordable and pricing is very flexible and easy to add more space when needed. This allows us to only pay for what we need.
  • Having our critical files protected is the most important thing. The fact that it doesn't cost much for us to do that is just a bonus.
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Dropbox
  • Dropbox has a very generous free option. Once surpassed, the cost is relatively inexpensive, which makes it a low cost option for file sharing.
  • It allows us to easily share files with clients without needing to pay for other services that are email based.
  • It's wide usage and wide acceptance in the business world makes it easy to work with other individuals and companies, speeding up collaboration.
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