What users are saying about
74 Ratings
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Top Rated
184 Ratings
74 Ratings
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Score 8 out of 100

Redis

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184 Ratings
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Score 8.8 out of 100

Likelihood to Recommend

Cassandra

Apache Cassandra is a NoSQL database and well suited where you need highly available, linearly scalable, tunable consistency and high performance across varying workloads. It has worked well for our use cases, and I shared my experiences to use it effectively at the last Cassandra summit! http://bit.ly/1Ok56TKIt is a NoSQL database, finally you can tune it to be strongly consistent and successfully use it as such. However those are not usual patterns, as you negotiate on latency. It works well if you require that. If your use case needs strongly consistent environments with semantics of a relational database or if the use case needs a data warehouse, or if you need NoSQL with ACID transactions, Apache Cassandra may not be the optimum choice.
Rekha Joshi | TrustRadius Reviewer

Redis

Redis is great at at reducing your reliance on SQL and the cost associated with running a SQL infrastructure.We have been able to scale out and improve performance on database requests. Reliability has also great improved over running a SQL infrastructure
Anonymous | TrustRadius Reviewer

Feature Rating Comparison

NoSQL Databases

Cassandra
7.9
Redis
8.5
Performance
Cassandra
8.3
Redis
9.3
Availability
Cassandra
8.6
Redis
8.7
Concurrency
Cassandra
7.8
Redis
8.6
Security
Cassandra
8.0
Redis
7.2
Scalability
Cassandra
9.3
Redis
8.7
Data model flexibility
Cassandra
6.6
Redis
8.3
Deployment model flexibility
Cassandra
7.0
Redis
8.5

Pros

Cassandra

  • Continuous availability: as a fully distributed database (no master nodes), we can update nodes with rolling restarts and accommodate minor outages without impacting our customer services.
  • Linear scalability: for every unit of compute that you add, you get an equivalent unit of capacity. The same application can scale from a single developer's laptop to a web-scale service with billions of rows in a table.
  • Amazing performance: if you design your data model correctly, bearing in mind the queries you need to answer, you can get answers in milliseconds.
  • Time-series data: Cassandra excels at recording, processing, and retrieving time-series data. It's a simple matter to version everything and simply record what happens, rather than going back and editing things. Then, you can compute things from the recorded history.
David Prinzing | TrustRadius Reviewer

Redis

  • Easy for developers to understand. Unlike Riak, which I've used in the past, it's fast without having to worry about eventual consistency.
  • Reliable. With a proper multi-node configuration, it can handle failover instantly.
  • Configurable. We primarily still use Memcache for caching but one of the teams uses Redis for both long-term storage and temporary expiry keys without taking on another external dependency.
  • Fast. We process tens of thousands of RPS and it doesn't skip a beat.
David Sommers | TrustRadius Reviewer

Cons

Cassandra

  • Cassandra runs on the JVM and therefor may require a lot of GC tuning for read/write intensive applications.
  • Requires manual periodic maintenance - for example it is recommended to run a cleanup on a regular basis.
  • There are a lot of knobs and buttons to configure the system. For many cases the default configuration will be sufficient, but if its not - you will need significant ramp up on the inner workings of Cassandra in order to effectively tune it.
Anonymous | TrustRadius Reviewer

Redis

  • We had some difficulty scaling Redis without it becoming prohibitively expensive.
  • Redis has very simple search capabilities, which means its not suitable for all use cases.
  • Redis doesn't have good native support for storing data in object form and many libraries built over it return data as a string, meaning you need build your own serialization layer over it.
Eric Mason | TrustRadius Reviewer

Likelihood to Renew

Cassandra

Cassandra 8.5
Based on 16 answers
I would recommend Cassandra DB to those who know their use case very well, as well as know how they are going to store and retrieve data. If you need a guarantee in data storage and retrieval, and a DB that can be linearly grown by adding nodes across availability zones and regions, then this is the database you should choose.
Anonymous | TrustRadius Reviewer

Redis

Redis 9.7
Based on 13 answers
We will definitely continue using Redis because:1. It is free and open source.2. We already use it in so many applications, it will be hard for us to let go.3. There isn't another competitive product that we know of that gives a better performance.4. We never had any major issues with Redis, so no point turning our backs.
Rahul Chaudhary | TrustRadius Reviewer

Usability

Cassandra

Cassandra 7.0
Based on 1 answer
It’s great tool but it can be complicated when it comes administration and maintenance.
Glen Kim | TrustRadius Reviewer

Redis

Redis 8.1
Based on 3 answers
Redis has been around for very long and it is good at what it does. It proved to be very valuable in my use case for interfacing between two applications with very little code as it has drivers for almost every language out there and the community support is really good.
Anonymous | TrustRadius Reviewer

Support Rating

Cassandra

Cassandra 7.0
Based on 1 answer
Sometimes instead giving straight answer, we ‘re getting transfered to talk professional service.
Glen Kim | TrustRadius Reviewer

Redis

Redis 7.7
Based on 2 answers
The support team has always been excellent in handling our mostly questions, rarely problems. They are responsive, find the solution and get us moving forward again. I have never had to escalate a case with them. They have always solved our problems in a very timely manner. I highly commend the support team.
Gene Baker | TrustRadius Reviewer

Implementation Rating

Cassandra

Cassandra 7.0
Based on 1 answer
No answer on this topic is available.

Redis

Redis 7.3
Based on 1 answer
Whitelisting of the AWS lambda functions.
Anonymous | TrustRadius Reviewer

Alternatives Considered

Cassandra

We evaluated MongoDB also, but don't like the single point failure possibility. The HBase coupled us too tightly to the Hadoop world while we prefer more technical flexibility. Also HBase is designed for "cold"/old historical data lake use cases and is not typically used for web and mobile applications due to its performance concern. Cassandra, by contrast, offers the availability and performance necessary for developing highly available applications. Furthermore, the Hadoop technology stack is typically deployed in a single location, while in the big international enterprise context, we demand the feasibility for deployment across countries and continents, hence finally we are favor of Cassandra
yixiang Shan | TrustRadius Reviewer

Redis

We are big users of MySQL and PostgreSQL. We were looking at replacing our aging web page caching technology and found that we could do it in SQL, but there was a NoSQL movement happening at the time. We dabbled a bit in the NoSQL scene just to get an idea of what it was about and whether it was for us. We tried a bunch, but I can only seem to remember Mongo and Couch. Mongo had big issues early on that drove us to Redis and we couldn't quite figure out how to deploy couch.
Anonymous | TrustRadius Reviewer

Return on Investment

Cassandra

  • I have no experience with this but from the blogs and news what I believe is that in businesses where there is high demand for scalability, Cassandra is a good choice to go for.
  • Since it works on CQL, it is quite familiar with SQL in understanding therefore it does not prevent a new employee to start in learning and having the Cassandra experience at an industrial level.
Anonymous | TrustRadius Reviewer

Redis

  • Redis has helped us increase our throughput and server data to a growing amount of traffic while keeping our app fast. We couldn't have grown without the ability to easily cache data that Redis provides.
  • Redis has helped us decrease the load on our database. By being able to scale up and cache important data, we reduce the load on our database reducing costs and infra issues.
  • Running a Redis node on something like AWS can be costly, but it is often a requirement for scaling a company. If you need data quickly and your business is already a positive ROI, Redis is worth the investment.
Anonymous | TrustRadius Reviewer

Screenshots

Pricing Details

Cassandra

General

Free Trial
Free/Freemium Version
Premium Consulting/Integration Services
Entry-level set up fee?
No

Redis

General

Free Trial
Yes
Free/Freemium Version
Yes
Premium Consulting/Integration Services
Yes
Entry-level set up fee?
Optional

Rating Summary

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