What users are saying about
112 Ratings
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169 Ratings
112 Ratings
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Score 8.7 out of 101

Redis

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169 Ratings
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Score 9.1 out of 101

Likelihood to Recommend

Elasticsearch

Elasticsearch is the gold standard for text-based search. Across large data sets it performs admirably, and we will certainly make it our first choice search solution in the future. For a use case where needs are simple and regular database queries might suffice, Elasticsearch may or may not provide any benefits.
No photo available

Redis

Redis is great at at reducing your reliance on SQL and the cost associated with running a SQL infrastructure.We have been able to scale out and improve performance on database requests. Reliability has also great improved over running a SQL infrastructure
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Feature Rating Comparison

NoSQL Databases

Elasticsearch
Redis
8.3
Performance
Elasticsearch
Redis
9.3
Availability
Elasticsearch
Redis
8.8
Concurrency
Elasticsearch
Redis
8.8
Security
Elasticsearch
Redis
6.6
Scalability
Elasticsearch
Redis
8.6
Data model flexibility
Elasticsearch
Redis
7.7
Deployment model flexibility
Elasticsearch
Redis
8.0

Pros

Elasticsearch

  • Super-fast search on millions of documents. We've got over 2 billion documents in our index and the retrieve speeds are still in the < 1-second range.
  • Analytics on top of your search. If you organize your data appropriately, Elasticsearch can serve as a distributed OLAP system
  • Elasticsearch is great for geographic data as well, including searching and filtering with geojson, and a variety of geospatial algorithms.
Anatoly Geyfman profile photo

Redis

  • Easy for developers to understand. Unlike Riak, which I've used in the past, it's fast without having to worry about eventual consistency.
  • Reliable. With a proper multi-node configuration, it can handle failover instantly.
  • Configurable. We primarily still use Memcache for caching but one of the teams uses Redis for both long-term storage and temporary expiry keys without taking on another external dependency.
  • Fast. We process tens of thousands of RPS and it doesn't skip a beat.
David Sommers profile photo

Cons

Elasticsearch

  • Setting Java memory thresholds can be a pain for those not accustomed to things like Eden Space & Old Generation which can lead to over allocation, or more likely, under allocation. Apache Solr had a similar issue. It would be nice if the program would take an extra step and dogfood it's own advice by analyzing the system & processes to return a solid recommendation for that configuration. The proper configuration information is outlined in the documentation, it would be nice if that was automated.
  • The only health check that ElasticSearch reports back is a "red" status without any real solid information about what is going on, though its usually memory thresholds or disk I/O. I am currently on ElasticSearch 1.5 so that may have changed for newer versions. When the status goes "red", I as the administrator of the software, feel like I lose control of whats going on which should rarely happen. Something more verbose would eliminate that.
  • This is more of a critique of the ElasticStack in general. The whole top to bottom stack is starting to get feature creep with things that are better suited in other software and increasing the barrier for entry for people to get started with setting up a robust logging infrastructure. ElasticSearch as a storage search engine, is pretty streamlined, but I can see that the tools that comprise the ELK Stack are going to require a certification with constant study at some point. During major release for Logstash a while back, it literally took a month to learn a new language because Elastic completely changed the syntax. For a medium sized organization of only a couple of admins, that is a pretty high bar where time is money. They really should work on refining/automating the tools & search engine they have, instead of shoehorning/changing things on to an already rock solid foundation.
Colby Shores profile photo

Redis

  • We had some difficulty scaling Redis without it becoming prohibitively expensive.
  • Redis has very simple search capabilities, which means its not suitable for all use cases.
  • Redis doesn't have good native support for storing data in object form and many libraries built over it return data as a string, meaning you need build your own serialization layer over it.
Eric Mason profile photo

Likelihood to Renew

Elasticsearch

Elasticsearch 10.0
Based on 1 answer
We're pretty heavily invested in ElasticSearch at this point, and there aren't any obvious negatives that would make us reconsider this decision.
Aaron Gussman profile photo

Redis

Redis 9.4
Based on 12 answers
We will definitely continue using Redis because:1. It is free and open source.2. We already use it in so many applications, it will be hard for us to let go.3. There isn't another competitive product that we know of that gives a better performance.4. We never had any major issues with Redis, so no point turning our backs.
Rahul Chaudhary profile photo

Usability

Elasticsearch

Elasticsearch 10.0
Based on 1 answer
To get started with Elasticsearch, you don't have to get very involved in configuring what really is an incredibly complex system under the hood. You simply install the package, run the service, and you're immediately able to begin using it. You don't need to learn any sort of query language to add data to Elasticsearch or perform some basic searching.If you're used to any sort of RESTful API, getting started with Elasticsearch is a breeze. If you've never interacted with a RESTful API directly, the journey may be a little more bumpy. Overall, though, it's incredibly simple to use for what it's doing under the covers.
No photo available

Redis

Redis 8.4
Based on 3 answers
Redis has been around for very long and it is good at what it does. It proved to be very valuable in my use case for interfacing between two applications with very little code as it has drivers for almost every language out there and the community support is really good.
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Support

Elasticsearch

Elasticsearch 7.5
Based on 2 answers
I've never used official support from the company behind Elasticsearch, but I had to get support from community, and being a so known product, it is really easy find someone else facing the same issues you have, and most of time, presenting a good solution for that.
Erlon Sousa Pinheiro profile photo

Redis

Redis 4.5
Based on 1 answer
Redis has lots of documentation publicly available so we do not require much support.
No photo available

Implementation

Elasticsearch

Elasticsearch 9.0
Based on 1 answer
Do not mix data and master roles. Dedicate at least 3 nodes just for Master
No photo available

Redis

Redis 7.3
Based on 1 answer
Whitelisting of the AWS lambda functions.
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Alternatives Considered

Elasticsearch

With Elasticsearch you can integrate a lot of data sources. It can act as a small DataLake where you can put different kinds of data and extract important insights. With Splunk, additional to elevated costs of licensing and hardware, you need to have expert engineers to address business and platform requirements. If you have Elasticsearch, it can be easily deployed and scaled.
Jose Adan Ortiz profile photo

Redis

We are big users of MySQL and PostgreSQL. We were looking at replacing our aging web page caching technology and found that we could do it in SQL, but there was a NoSQL movement happening at the time. We dabbled a bit in the NoSQL scene just to get an idea of what it was about and whether it was for us. We tried a bunch, but I can only seem to remember Mongo and Couch. Mongo had big issues early on that drove us to Redis and we couldn't quite figure out how to deploy couch.
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Return on Investment

Elasticsearch

  • ElasticSearch was able to meet the high demands of our product when it mattered most.
  • Implementation of ElasticSearch was easy and quick, saving on the cost of implementation.
  • Managing ElasticSearch is very easy. With the right monitoring tools in place, it really is "set it and forget it".
No photo available

Redis

  • Redis has helped us increase our throughput and server data to a growing amount of traffic while keeping our app fast. We couldn't have grown without the ability to easily cache data that Redis provides.
  • Redis has helped us decrease the load on our database. By being able to scale up and cache important data, we reduce the load on our database reducing costs and infra issues.
  • Running a Redis node on something like AWS can be costly, but it is often a requirement for scaling a company. If you need data quickly and your business is already a positive ROI, Redis is worth the investment.
No photo available

Screenshots

Elasticsearch

Pricing Details

Elasticsearch

General

Free Trial
Free/Freemium Version
Premium Consulting/Integration Services
Entry-level set up fee?
No

Redis

General

Free Trial
Yes
Free/Freemium Version
Yes
Premium Consulting/Integration Services
Yes
Entry-level set up fee?
Optional

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