Microsoft Endpoint Manager (Microsoft Intune + SCCM)

Microsoft Endpoint Manager (Microsoft Intune + SCCM)

About TrustRadius Scoring
Score 8.5 out of 100
Microsoft Endpoint Manager (Microsoft Intune + SCCM)

Overview

Recent Reviews

Microsoft Intune Review

9 out of 10
January 17, 2020
We use it for mobile device management, mobile application management, Mac OS management, and Windows 10 management. I have also converted …
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Awards

TrustRadius Award Top Rated 2021
TrustRadius Award Top Rated 2020
TrustRadius Award Top Rated 2019
TrustRadius Award Top Rated 2018

Reviewer Pros & Cons

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Video Reviews

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Pricing

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Microsoft 365 Business Basic

$5

On Premise
per user/per month

Microsoft 365 For Individuals

$6.99

On Premise
per month

Microsoft 365 Apps

$8.25

On Premise
per user/per month

Entry-level set up fee?

  • No setup fee

Offerings

  • Free Trial
  • Free/Freemium Version
  • Premium Consulting / Integration Services

Features Scorecard

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Product Details

What is Microsoft Endpoint Manager (Microsoft Intune + SCCM)?

Microsoft Endpoint Manager, combining the capabilities of the former Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager, SCCM or ConfigMgr with the mobile device management application Microsoft Intune, is presented as a unified endpoint management option.

The former Microsoft Intune is an endpoint management solution for mobile devices, an MDM solution that allows the user to securely manage iOS, Android, Windows, and macOS devices with a single endpoint management solution.

The component Endpoint Configuration Manager (the former SCCM) is a system monitoring and management platform that can be deployed as an agent, via the cloud, or on-premises. It can manage systems across OS types (Windows, Mac, Linux), as well as multiple environments, including servers, virtual environments, and mobile devices from a single management console, and supports scaling capabilities, such as future application delivery.

The platform includes a customizable reporting tool to inform future business software decisions. It also enables endpoint protection from malware and vulnerability identification within the monitored systems and infrastructure.

Microsoft Endpoint Manager (Microsoft Intune + SCCM) Video

Announcing Microsoft Endpoint Manager

Microsoft Endpoint Manager (Microsoft Intune + SCCM) Integrations

Microsoft Endpoint Manager (Microsoft Intune + SCCM) Technical Details

Deployment TypesOn-premise
Operating SystemsWindows
Mobile ApplicationNo

Comparisons

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Reviews

(1-25 of 48)
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Joe Aldeguer | TrustRadius Reviewer
Score 8 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
  • Windows Autopilot
  • Integrates well with Apple devices
  • Good tech support
  • Runs in the cloud there is no need to put up an on-premises server
  • Deploying more apps besides Microsoft Edge and Microsoft Office 365 app
  • Microsoft needs to make it easier to deploy exe, pkg, and msi apps without having to go through the manual process of re-packaging these apps using tools from github like intuneapputil
  • Add a feature to push out software updates for 3rd party apps
Mark McCully | TrustRadius Reviewer
Score 8 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
  • Centralized administration of mobile devices - updates, security, reporting
  • Seamless integration with SCCM
  • ability to wipe devices remotely if lost or stolen
  • built in reports aren't very useful.
  • could be more cost effective.
Score 10 out of 10
Vetted Review
Reseller
Review Source
  • Able to create Compliance Policies and Configuration Profiles
  • Configure Windows Update settings
  • Configure Endpoint security settings and Windows Defender Antivirus
  • Create App Protection and Configuration Policies
  • More hardware details of devices such as drives, memory, etc.
  • Ability to remotely connect to a PC without 3rd party software
  • Not really any other cons that stand out
Score 9 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
  • SCCM imaging can't be beat
  • Intune application deployment and WSUS ensures that devices are getting updates and applications, especially in WFH scenarios
  • The upgraded interface is much easier to work with than older SCCM iterations (2007 and below)
  • The ADMX templates are still lacking in some areas
  • Like SCCM, Endpoint Manager requires patience
  • It would be nice if there was better integration for remote connectivity
Score 9 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
  • Inventory management.
  • Policy enforcement
  • Device Tracking
  • Imaging
  • Continuous updates add new functionality
  • Update delays in the subsystems
  • Artificial limits on number of items displayed in lists, different on each page.
  • Continous updates means that the location to find features moves.
Score 8 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
  • [Microsoft Endpoint Manager (Microsoft Intune + SCCM)] helps to speed up the deployment of patches/software throughout our environment. I can easily build a package and then deploy across all endpoints.
  • The ability to supercede software is also quite handy. This automates the removal of old versions and replacing them with newer versions.
  • The Intune Autopilot option is very useful if you want to deploy software to devices straight out of the box. You can configure them to download software when a user opens a new PC and turns it on for the first time.
  • The one major drawback to SCCM is the delays or inability to deploy software if the device doesn't stay online long enough. This is particularly an issue in our environment for those users who work remotely and don't connect to our VPN client. If you can deploy via Cloud agent, this issue should go away
  • There is a steep learning curve in getting SCCM configured and creating packages created, but it works great once configured.
Score 8 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
  • We can add and assign mobile apps to user groups and devices
  • Manage access on personal devices by restricting actions users can do or not
  • Wipe or removing organization data from apps
  • Reporting should be improved
  • Better integration with AV software
  • AI integration with alert notification about unusual user behavior
Score 9 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
  • Device management.
  • Complete control over the flow of information on the mobile device.
  • Allows secure data access on BYOD.
  • Compliance and policy enforcement on the Office apps in mobile.
  • Dashboard customization can be improved.
  • Privacy between personal and office data as i don't want that my company control my phone.
  • Location service could be improved.
  • Enhanced security and integration with other apps.
Score 7 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
  • OS imaging and deployment via BOOTP across various locations through North America
  • Patch management across various locations through North America
  • Easier to find where something is inside the application.
  • Faster results after patching has been completed, and it takes hours some time to see if a server was patched or something failed to install.
Kurt Ferguson | TrustRadius Reviewer
Score 10 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
  • Windows and Office patching: SCCM does this really well. It is efficient, reliable, and easy to schedule. It's quite simple to keep machines updated once they've been registered.
  • Application Deployment: SCCM very effectively deploys application and application updates. We use it very effectively to reinstall our security software if it gets uninstalled or needs to be updated.
  • Reporting: The SQL Reporting Services oriented user-interface is really not particularly user-friendly.
  • Inventory: The inventory function is overly basic and difficult to search. If this were improved to be a legitimate asset management tool, it would tremendously increase the value of SCCM to organizations.
Score 9 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
  • It has nice GUI's built-in for many of the functions throughout the program. This helps to make it easier for the IT Administrator to be able to utilize certain features/functions when using SCCM.
  • It doesn't use a lot of system resources when running, or even if left open on the server. This is good, as it enables those that work with the program to still be productive with being able to run other programs/software on the server.
  • It has really good remote assistance options built-in. This is particularly helpful for the IT Admin being able to assist end-users over a remote session or to remotely connect to computers. This is also a benefit for organizations that don't have a commercial remote assistance product in place.
  • The program itself can be challenging to use, especially if there hasn't been any formal training on the use of the product. Either training/reviewing documentation is recommended prior to using SCCM.
  • At times, it can be difficult to try and find out why a certain machine that's listed in SCCM says that the endpoint has the SCCM client and shows as Active, but in fact, it's not. It's also difficult at times to try and figure out why the client can't be pushed down to the endpoint.
  • Even though the remote assistance features in SCCM are really good, it can be challenging at times when the remote options don't work for a particular endpoint, even though the machine is active, online, etc.
Score 8 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
  • Patching lots of computers (in my case 400+) without leaving your seat!! Less administrative overheads.
  • Deploying new machines with a standard image that is the same across the organisation and no one has a different set of image and therefore consistancy within the organsation.
  • Provide a comprehensive inventory of the organisation's computer assets.
  • Provide security auditors with patching compliance reports within the organisation.
  • Driver portals for different PC/Laptop manufactures.
  • There is no dashboard for the executive summary of the organisation's patch levels.
  • Being able to see the downloaded patches (labeled with KB numbers) according to their names on the SCCM server.
Adam Martin | TrustRadius Reviewer
Score 7 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
  • It allows users to install packages from a Self-servicing application via an app called Software Center.
  • It allows for fast remediation of vulnerabilities across your organization.
  • Provides reports for high-level visibility of your environment for upper management.
  • Building a collection and deployment takes some time to learn. It isn't very user intuitive.
  • Getting up to date reports on a deployment isn't a one-click process. It requires triggering multiple events and waiting about 10-15 minutes
  • I wish there was a dashboard feature built into SCCM. I manage the JAMF platform in my environment as well, and this is one of the key features I rely on every day. When I need to pull a report in System Center Configuration Manager it is just clunky.
Score 7 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
  • Remote Control works well and does not require a lot of configuration. It must be understood that the Remote Control feature of System Center Configuration Manager is different from RDP, as it does not establish a separate user session and allows a tech to troubleshoot issues in a way visible to a user.
  • It is easy to add client devices for management, and multiple options are available (push, Active Directory, etc.)
  • It's modular and extensible. For example, a third-party company, Parallels, makes a System Center Configuration Manager plugin to manage Macs from the same console.
  • Installation is very laborious and complicated. The number of things to manually configure during the installation is incredible.
  • OS deployment is hard to configure and troubleshoot. The Microsoft article on deploying Windows 10 via System Center Configuration Manager in a test environment takes 44 minutes to read (Microsoft's estimate, not mine -- check here: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/deployment/windows-10-poc-sc-config-mgr). If something goes wrong, there are multiple log locations to check on both the server and client, making troubleshooting difficult.
  • The management console looks old, and its performance isn't great. It is often hard to find settings in the console, and it refreshes slowly. The old name for System Center Configuration Manager, SMS, comes to mind often. "Slowly Moving Software."
Mark Fitzgerald | TrustRadius Reviewer
Score 7 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
  • You are able to create queries to identify almost any combination of computers needed.
  • Its direct tie to active directory.
  • It fully leverages Windows functionality.
  • Its mac integrations, though improving, are really not much more than inventory.
  • It could benefit from an enterprise remote control solution more similar to Bomgar or LogMeIn.
  • Its web interface for reporting is very dated.
Score 10 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
  • It's easy to group machines into separate categories, such as servers and workstations, or more in-depth categories, such as location X workstations and location Y servers, to easily target them for patches.
  • Sending software to a workstation through SCCM is simple!
  • Patching can be handled with bandwidth restrictions in mind, letting only X% of the wire be used for patching and even allowing the patches to go to a specific downstream server at a location to let all local workstations leech from there instead of the web or WAN.
  • It takes time to implement SCCM. Take advantage of an integration company whenever possible.
  • Its capabilities are broad and can go so deep that it takes a while to understand just a portion of it. Get training whenever possible.
  • Reporting is useful but could be expanded to more of a Power BI capability.
Score 9 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
  • You can run an inventory of your assets, from PCs to laptops, grouping them by location, type, department, all tight to your own Active Directory. That saves a lot of time when you need to report the status of hardware and software. You can even manage alerts to inform you when some hardware change has happened, which could possibly lead to a robbery.
  • You can centralize software distribution, controlling what kind of software is available for your organization, and here's the most important part: you can give end-users the power to install/remove that software by themselves. That way, you can avoid a ticket to your service desk and potentially save money on those tickets too.
  • Also, due to the distributed architecture of the product, you can deploy a component of the system in each remote site you have. Thanks to that, you can avoid using the bandwidth of the remote site, which usually is already limited, to download software/updates to each PC locally. You just need to download once for the distribution point it will deliver locally. You can also avoid the risk of having your local WAN to be contested by some unexpected outdated PC that was just connected to your network.
  • The licenses can be expensive if you are a small organization. Make sure you have a good deal with your Microsoft partner.
  • Deal with collections can be a little hard sometimes. Collections are the say the product classify or organize the groups. As the concept is a little different from what we're used to, like Active Directory Organizational Units or Security Groups, etc., it's best if you spend some time studying this before you deploy the product in your organization, especially if your organization has severy business or business units and remote sites.
  • You don't have as much product specialists as you have for other Microsoft products like MS Exchange, for example. So, make sure you hire a partner that have the skills needed to help you during the deploy of the product. Indeed, it is a complex product and it demands attention to details to avoid frustration in the future. People tend to save money on the implementation phase and that leads to frustration and, in some cases, projects cancellation due to underestimation of the requirements of the product.
Score 7 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
  • Centrally managing applications, configuration settings and policies makes it easier to deploy. So when someone requests an application or is missing the application, I can jump on the Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager console and add them to the software deployment and generally within the hour, the application is installed on their computer. It can be manually forced to pull the change as well if you don't want to wait up to an hour.
  • Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager does take a lot of time to learn and manage. There are a lot of bits and pieces to keep up to date (software packages, drivers, OS builds, computer model packages). It is not something that you can easily pickup and start configuring. And with automation, making a mistake can cause the scripts to take days instead of hours.
  • There are frequently update failures. I understand many of these are configuration problems on our end or that the state of the computer is such that the updates cannot be pushed to it. But I feel like it happens a bit much.
Score 8 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
  • Windows 10 servicing.
  • Endpoint protection policies and updates.
  • Reporting.
  • Surface Driver updates seem flaky.
  • Sometimes needs some TLC to keep Microsoft SCCM and WSUS happy.
  • Menu structure sometimes gets a little confusing.