TrustRadius
Redis is an open source in-memory data structure server and NoSQL database.https://media.trustradius.com/product-logos/N7/OG/GE6NPTP63INR.PNGRedis is battle-testedWe use Redis as a distributed cache and distributed lock for our microservice environment. We have so many machines performing jobs that it's hard to make sure no task gets dropped or accidentally gets performed twice. And that's where Redis comes in--to store the global state or what jobs have been done in a fast, reliable way.,Helpful customer support. Reasonable pricing. Keeps Redis software secure and up-to-date quietly in the background.,Replies from customer support via could be a little faster. We're on the basic plan, and it can take up to 2 business days--it's not fast enough when your bugs need to be solved right away.,9,Reduced number of bugs released. A single point of failure if Redis goes down due to some bad queries.,As an in-memory multi-model database, it's helped our microsystem share a global state as needed very easily and reliably. That has helped reduce the number of bugs, increase development time, and help engineers not worry about incidents when they get off of work.,No,Price Product Features Product Usability Product Reputation Prior Experience with the Product Vendor Reputation,I would say that without Redis, we'd have to move most of the load to our Postgres instance. That would have resulted in really slow job processing. I don't think using Redis helps with cleaner code though--Redis queries are a bit funky and don't look at nice as querying using SQL. Also, it requires an additional client library that is often not as maintained as PG libraries.,PostgreSQL, Elasticsearch, ScalaRedis is great when you use it correctly.We use Redis in many capacities. We use it as a caching layer, as a shared heap, as a datastore for lock contention, as a queue, and as a primary datastore. It provides low latency storage that can be used to persist data between web requests. The data structures available allow us to use it to manage contended data in a safe and predictable fashion.,Fast key value store Serializable concurrent usage (by virtue of being single-threaded) Wide library support,Failover is terrifying and its safety guarantees are misleading Large sets (> 500k entries) have noticeable performance degradation on what is advertised to be a O(1) query pattern Hardware costs are high,6,It allows us to better leverage DynamoDB and other large scale databases. We can do the contentious logic in Redis and then flush to our larger datastore. Using Redis as a shared heap allows us to easily implement standards such as Oauth2 and other stateful protocols without having to do session pinning. We can treat our application servers as stateless and enjoy the simplicity that provides. Using Redis as a write-back cache to absorb spiky writes to our Postgres database has led to cost savings.,It's fast and we leverage it as a cache. The multi-model nature has allowed us to leverage more complex data structures to make it more effective in our specific use cases.,No,Price Product Usability Prior Experience with the Product Vendor Reputation Existing Relationship with the Vendor,It mostly has just better application performance when used as a cache. The code isn't really cleaner, and we've been disappointed in the network performance we've seen.,Amazon DynamoDB,Amazon Aurora, Amazon DynamoDB, Amazon Simple Queue Service (SQS)Honest hands-on review of RedisWe leverage Redis as our L2 centralized cache to hold frequently accessed data such as user ids, account balances, and other metadata. It is used across our entire organization for various software services and projects. For us, the ease of spinning up an instance and having it "Just work!" is what is appealing. We don't have the luxury of hiring Redis administrators, but since our use case isn't too complex, a hosted version works just fine for us. This should speak to the flexible usability with the product.,It's easy to manage. It fits most simple caching use cases. Can be clustered. Highly configurable.,Clustering can be easier to set up. Sharing data can be challenging.,10,Employee cost savings. I didn't have to hire someone to manage our Redis layer because it's simple enough to trust to a SaaS. We were able to get to market quickly because of the simplicity and joy it brought to the developers building the stack. The default cache choice made has saved us hours of discussion time.,Redis allowed us to be cloud-agnostic. The adoption of Redis also makes integration easy because there is a Redis library for almost every modern-day programming language. Because it's in memory and can be centralized, I can spin up service within minutes. Being in startup land, time is absolutely money, so getting to market is critical. Redis' stability also comes into factor. The biggest issues I have had so far are my connections going out of control and Redis blocking new attempts at connecting. Again, application and Redis configuration issues, not really a Redis issue. Bottom line, it's one less layer to worry about. You really just set and forget it, and if it's not working, you probably just need to fine-tune the config.,No,Price Product Features Product Usability Product Reputation Existing Relationship with the Vendor,Yes, a common theme at our company is with Redis, we are quick to boot any new service. Do you need a cache? Do we run multiple instances of the same service? Use Redis.,MemSQLRedis might not be the Panacea you are thinking of!Redis is currently being used in silo within my company. Our department was one of the first groups to use it as part of the software modernization initiative.,Caching strategy,Redis is not a panacea for fast and quick access to the frequently used data. There were times the development team had to go back to JVM cache to achieve the use case. Maintaining Redis as a separate persistence has its price ( in operation and maintenance). HA and DR was a biggest challenge with the widespread adoption of Redis,5,Increased Architectural Complexity: The system now has an additional component in the ecosystem. Extra technical skill for developers/Support team to learn. It addressed immediate system challenges in performance by centrally caching data that could not be distributed across all of the JVMs because of volume.,Redis certainly met the minimum use cases we tried to fit it with. At some point, we had to balance between Redis and JVM caching.,No,Product Features Product Usability,Spring Framework support to integrate Redis was a big benefit towards this goal.,,CassandraPerfect performing cacheWe use it for high-speed cache, data storage for short periods of time, and it is ideal for immediate access to the leaderboard.,Speed. Ease of use. Variety of use cases.,Support faster SSL access, currently bring performance down by 50% with SSL. Cost - Most providers not cheap. Native support to access search through a variety of data formats.,9,ROI specifically to development costs. Speed to market.,Speed to deliver cached preprocessed responses.,No,Price Product Features Product Usability Prior Experience with the Product,MySQL, Apache Kafka, CassandraRedis is a great solution for any company that wants fast development and good performanceIt is used for the whole organization for caching and performance. We avoid hitting the DB in a factor of more than 100x, at a lower cost.,Key-value access, very fast. Caching - either using hashmaps or simple values.,The Python package elastic DSL is somehow incomplete. Moving from a Python client to Redis 2 to Redis 3 is a mess.,10,Saved money on DB. Improved user experience.,It provides us the flexibility to store different objects and allows for easy, fast access.,No,Product Features Product Reputation Prior Experience with the Product,It hasn't. The architecture of Redis should not affect us.,,Elasticsearch, AWS Lambda, DockerEnhancement of Data StructureRedis provides support for database analysis and integration of many functions and programs. It is mainly used by our backend team and data analyst. It helped us to grow and expand our business a lot. The tools they provide for the system are the best thing for our organization. Our whole organization is fond of using it and is praiseworthy by our whole team. Many projects that we have done are due to Redis.,Introduction to new things like sorted list and hyper logs. Speed of deployment for programs. Data structure it has given.,Data scaling User interface,9,Improve our product and project quantity.,Redis provides a basic and easy interface that helps with database creation. It helps the developer to simplify the program and integrate it into the database with various sorted sets. Our organization has indulged a lot from Redis. It supports the multi-platform that helps the user to use it more implicitly.,Not Sure,Product Reputation Positive Sales Experience with the Vendor Analyst ReportsReduction of cost with a performance gainWe use Redis as our back end database. It greatly improved performance at a reduced cost.,Scalability Database performance redundancy,Technical support Migration from other database structures Pricing,10,The ROI has been stellar. It has reduced our infrastructure costs Databases run much faster then our on-prem enviroment More reliability and redundancy,Increased performance and reliability has reduced our overall infrastructure costs across the board.,Yes,Price Product Features Product Usability Third-party Reviews,We have benefited from Redis by cleaning our code up significantly and faster deployment and performance increases at a reduced cost.,,Microsoft 365 Business, Microsoft Azure, Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2)Some points about using Redis in small and medium productsWe're using Redis in our development department, as a layer on top of regular databases (MongoDB, MySQL), as cache, and for other critical data storage.,The main point: speed. Easy to use and integrate with the rest of the components of our system.,Full-text search support GUI tools Pricing,9,Reduced main database overload through caching as much as we can to Redis. High-speed authentication process in some of our apps.,We're not worried about multiplatform support in particular. High speed and stability saved a lot of time for us while building some prototypes, and also in larger products in production.,No,Price Product Features Product Usability Third-party Reviews,When we moved our authentication system to a 2-layered one, it took almost no development time to make a prototype and move in the production environment. It was really fast.,CouchDB,MongoDB, Node, Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2)Great experience with RedisWe use Redis to store non-critical persisted data such as sessions, cache fragments, task execution tombstones. Furthermore, we use it to link two systems that are written in different programming languages, using a queue as a connector.,Lightweight Easy to setup & configure Great documentation Great community Easy to use yet powerful,Not so simple to configure an AUTH to connect to the service Not so simple to scale it horizontally,10,Decreased DB load when we moved all of our sessions in Redis. Increased app performance when leveraging cache with Redis.,Redis is an in-memory storage and that's the most obvious yet important thing about this database. Surely in-memory storage means better performance, but it hurts when you have to restart your server or the service (like with other products). On the contrary, Redis supports persistence, dumping the entire image in RAM on the disk at the user-defined interval. All the machinery is achieved in parallel with a system forking process.,Yes,Product Features Product Usability Product Reputation Existing Relationship with the Vendor,Redis has such a simple API that you can start being productive in less than 10 minutes.,CouchDB and Apache Kafka,Elasticsearch, PostgreSQLBig data architecture with RedisThe R&D department uses Redis as 'in-memory' hot data storage (data storage layer of a machine learning big data architecture).,Low latency Support hundreds of connections,Significant learning curve Could be costly if not designed right,9,Scalable solution. Cost effective after some optimizations.,Low latency data layer abstraction in a containerized environment.,No,Price Product Features Prior Experience with the Product Existing Relationship with the Vendor,Our successful app development process is partially associated with Redis due to the following: Simple and elegant Python module which enables us to produce a scalable solution while maintain our code clean. Getting stored data fast was a big peace of the puzzle for our product backend.,Amazon Redshift,Docker, Amazon DynamoDB, Amazon RedshiftInstant database for instant user experienceIn Anzu technologies Pvt Ltd we used Redis for multiple reasons. We developed a social app which allows the user to bookmark the video and internet content. Performance was an important factor so we implemented user timelines using Redis sorted sets. We implemented the whole notification system using Redis. Our developed micro services architecture is using Redis. Caching was another common challenge where Redis performed very well. We just love Redis.,Caching Instant response Easy to use Very light footprint,Nested JSON indexing Fragmentation Nothing else,10,Reduced development time Reduced development cost Reduced infrastructure cost,Yes, due to multi-model databases we were able to get the best of different things and have no need to set up or maintain different databases.,Yes,Product Features Product Usability Product Reputation Vendor Reputation Third-party Reviews,Redis has huge community support, different client libraries and it's very easy to plug in play with any code.,Redis analysisWe use it as a service. With it, we have developed libraries for rate limiting, ETL job flow coordination, and counters.,Atomic counters Cache colocated with other services that require low latencies Automatic memory management,CLI could be improved Configuration management Replication and snarfing,8,Increase server throughout Better data flow coordination Better real-time allocation of resources with contention,Speed has been a key feature. Ease of usage has been great with Lua support. Still, we use it but I regret its usage.,Not Sure,Product Features Product Usability Prior Experience with the Product Existing Relationship with the Vendor,Yes, actually see my previous response. It’s easy to use and fast response times. Those have been keys features for its adoption.,Amazon DynamoDB,Amazon DynamoDB, Amazon S3 (Simple Storage Service), FirebaseOverview of RedisWe use Redis as a cache, inter-process communication mechanism and queue system. It is used by our IT team, and it helps us solve technical issues.,Very high performance Low Latency High Reliability of data via clustering and disk backups,Data protocol can be more compact,7,Increases scalability,Allowed quick exchange of data between many real-time applications,No,Price Vendor Reputation,Not really,Redis: Simple to get started, scales OK, bad at durabilityUsed only by engineering for our main production application. We use a Ruby based job system named Sidekiq that uses Redis as its backing store.,Lots of versatility. We use it as a dumb store for string payloads, but can store a bunch of other data structures also. Easy to set up,Persistence support isn't great. RDB is useless for our case (job system). AOF has *huge* performance issues, particularly when reading the file on startup after a failure.,8,Again, this is more about Sidekiq, but both it and Redis were extremely quick to set up. If I consider an alternative job system (e.g., SQS or Kafka), I'd either have vendor lock-in or a lot more sophistication.,Not too much. Again, we primarily use Redis only as a data store for Sidekiq, so storing JSON string blobs in a set. As a CTO, I actually want to discourage people from going too deep and sticking whatever data structures they want into Redis and reading them again later. This leads to all kinds of ad hoc data access patterns, as opposed to a few well supported/standardized ones.,No,Price Product Features Prior Experience with the Product,To be honest, I'm not sure that Redis actually offers any of these. Cleaner code? The Redis client has a simple API, but that has no bearing on the code complexity of its call sites.Faster execution time? Depends on the application. When possible, it's faster *not* to serialize to Redis and just process locally.Better application performance? Again, depends. e.g., how is Redis operated?Network utilization???? The wire format isn't particularly chatty, so that's good, but also hopefully not the contentious part of one's application.,MySQL, Apache Kafka and Amazon Simple Queue Service (SQS),Heroku, MySQL, Amazon Relational Database Service, Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2), AWS LambdaA Perfect FitRedis is used across our product offering as a user session store. It allows for very quick access to user session information and has been very reliable, serving our needs well.,Session storage. It's extremely fast. Reliable.,Nothing to suggest. It has fit our needs perfectly.,9,It has allowed us to save on some costs with other providers as Redis is very affordable. Time for deployment was minimal.,Since it is in-memory with great performance and stability, it was the perfect solution for us to use as our user session data store.,No,Price Product Features Product Usability,This was not a big issue for us.,,Google BigQuery, MySQL, Google Cloud SQLDead-Simple Configuration and Scary-Fast PerformanceOur organization uses Redis for two main tasks at our organization. First, Redis is used as a traditional in-memory key/store warehouse for a cache system that contains over 400 million items, on average. Using Redis with modern DDR4 memory, we have seen incredible latency savings when it comes to keystore look-ups. Second, we use Redis to manage a distributed queue, such that numerous worker nodes can subscribe to tasks and complete them in an organized way.,Key/Value datastore. Redis is incredibly fast when it comes to simple "phone book-style" lookups. Queue orchestration and management when there are many nodes in a system that need to all be on the same page. Dead-simple installation process. It takes about 3 minutes to install Redis and get the service started.,I am unable to come up with any legitimate cons, but one thing to note is that Redis, by default, will be installed with no password, leaving it open to the world if the host is not locked-down with a firewall.,10,Redis requires very little in terms of host hardware, and we have Redis running on tiny servers (2GB of memory and 2 cores, for example). Redis has also replaced multiple traditional datastores like MySQL and PostgreSQL, especially when it comes to logging and caching.,The in-memory aspect of it obviously is the main selling-point of Redis, in that it can immediately decrease latency for any service or application. Moreover, multi-platform support makes it trivial to interact with Redis, and we have never encountered a programming language that did not have very high quality documentation for the Redis SDKs and libraries. As far as stability, we have never had Redis cause a server to "crash" or have had the Redis server "crash" itself. It is dead-simple to manage.,Yes,Price Product Features Product Reputation,App development frequently involves decentalized systems, and we use Redis to centrally manage all the tasks and queues that feed these nodes. Redis allowed us to get rid of multiple hardware hosts, as well as scale-down other hosts because of its incredibly small footprint and almost nonexistent network overhead. The only limiting factor is the amount of RAM on the host, because of course, that is where Redis stores the vast majority of the data.,CouchDB and Cassandra,Laravel PHP Framework, Slack, PhpStormRedis is fast, great at set-operations, and easy to implement.We are currently using Redis to store sets of object-based information and lists. We query an external system and generate lists in Redis based on the query responses. Because Redis is great at set operations this speeds up the time it takes to make set-based calculations. This Redis cluster supports the a large aspect of the whole application.,Redis is easy to install and maintain. Redis is very fast, especially with set operations. Redis is cost effective.,Clustering, especially with multiple write nodes, can be difficult to configure. Configuring extremely high availability can be difficult.,9,We run on the cloud, where you usually pay for the time you use. Every second counts. Having a fast-acting Redis cluster helps defray hosting costs. Redis is free to install, meaning you can quickly spring up test proof of concept modules using Redis with minimal issues. Redis is usually "set it and forget it" so you can focus on other aspects of your business.,At my organization, speed is of the essence. We are processing a very large amount of data over a very short period of time. In order to be able to process this data quickly, we use Redis to store and process the intermediate data to be processed. The speed and stability of Redis of is vital to the operation of the platform as a whole. Should either suffer, the whole platform suffers.,No,Price Product Features Product Usability Product Reputation Vendor Reputation Third-party Reviews,Redis has a very easy to use programmable interface that allows us, no matter what implementation language is chosen for development, to be able to interact with the DB store. Because of this, we are able to implement functionality, test new features, and run Redis in multiple environments with ease and at minimal cost.,Riak, MongoDB and Elasticsearch,Riak, MongoDB, Elasticsearch, Node, AWS Lambda, AWS Elastic Beanstalk, Amazon Web Services, Docker, GitHub, Bitbucket, Gitlab, Ubuntu LinuxPerformant In-Memory DatabaseRedis is a vital part of our organization as it enables us to process a whole load of queues that our tools have to process. It provides so much value for us since most of our tools require queues to call APIs, etc. We used Redis because of its simplicity of setup and its fast performance. We loved Redis and sure you'd love it too!,Quick and Easy Setup Fast Performance Does its job well!,Setting up a cluster in Redis is a bit confusing and hard for the first time.,10,Increased server throughput Better user experience for users as they don't need to wait for the process at the web server level and could just visit the page after their requested job is completed.,Redis does its job well to be an in-memory multi-model database that really provides high speed and stability, also multi-platform support. Our tools mostly run on queues, so a fast database to store and process the queue items are a vital point of our business. We need a solution that meets our needs at high speed and stability.,No,Price Product Features Product Usability Product Reputation Prior Experience with the Product,Laravel PHP Framework, Nginx, MySQLRedis on high scalability worldWe use redis and recommend for our clients. The key areas Redis outsteps all others are: 1) Scalability 2) Unique and flexible key value db structure 3) They use Ssd Flash for their instances They also provide session management capabilities to be implemented in any huge projects without much headache. Their db instance also provides a high number of read write per second, which makes it a leader.,Session Management Key value pair DB structure High scalability Flash instances,Failover Replicas Data Consistency,10,It increased my speed of meshing. It increased my user experience by stream-less rendering. It created huge impact in my metasearch, my basic income has increased by 120% in last 45 days.,Cassandra, MongoDB and Aerospike Database,Google Cloud SQL,75,100,10,key value streams hash,nothing,No,10Redis is goooood!!!Redis is a basic, but extremely fast, key-value storage. We made a decision to use Redis because our use case didn't require a full blown database. We needed something to hold the data temporarily and loss of that data wouldn't lead to any issues. Redis was perfectly fitting our use case, and since then we are a bunch of happy Redis users.,Being a non-SQL database, it does not require any structure. Perfect for unstructured data like key-value pairs. Redis is extremely fault tolerant. As soon as we write a record, it gets saved to the disk, without any performance issues. Redis is very lightweight. In docker it takes less than 30MB, so it is so easy to run multiple containers in cluster without taking too much power. Redis has a very good query API, and they are in their website each operation is clearly mentioned with its time complexity. This gives you a clear picture of performance. We didn't in fact do any performance testing because we trusted their site with all the information. Redis has a very strong community around it. We have never found an issue for which a solution didn't exist beforehand.,A cluster in Redis was a little hard to understand and deploy, but this is a one time thing to learn, no worries.,10,Redis has small learning curve. Just a couple of small Linux type commands, and that's pretty much it. For this reason, everyone was on-boarded to use Redis almost within a week. Since Redis has good language support, we were comfortable using Redis for Java as well as NodeJs. Redis is overall fast. When we compare Redis with an actual database, Redis wins just because of how fast and easy it is.,Amazon ElastiCache,ServiceNow, JIRA Software,10Blazing performance, excellent stability, and really nothing to dislike make Redis a must look at solutionRedis is being leveraged to address big data, temporal data and session state challenges across the software stack. New opportunities to leverage it are continually being investigated and identified. It addresses data consistency and concurrency issues and provides amazing speed to what could be slower operations if handled without it.,Cache speed Support for high volume of transactions with elegant handling of data sets Ease of use - well structured and easy to implement,Price per shard is a bit high but over all there are no issues worth mentioning I've heard some wishing it supported complex queries but this is asking the solution to support operations it wasn't intended for,10,Reductions in latency allow operations that would be longer running (multiple seconds) to be performed nearly instantaneously providing for high performance. Redis allows for easier application scaling and support for a higher volume of transactions without typical performance curve limitations. Savings related to not having to pre-process unstructured data are hard to quantify but very appreciated in the sense of savings on code complexity.,The speed of operation allows for blindingly fast execution of elements of code that would normally be longer running. Reduction of the burden on our backend DB alleviates contention and congestion concerns especially for temporal/state data that really isn't meaningful long term. Stability is absolutely ESSENTIAL in our production environment and Redis does not disappoint. Lastly, multi-platform support keeps our options open as an element of future-proofing code and implementation platforms.,No,Product Features Product Usability Product Reputation,We have experienced all the benefits in just our first implementation -- the cleaner/less complex code required to manipulate data sets, reduction of the need to burden back-end database(s) with housekeeping operations, application performance improvements and definitely speed of data manipulation which enhances and optimizes application performance.,,Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), VMware NSX, HPE OneView, Foglight for Virtualization, Hitachi Content Platform (HCP), Hitachi Network Attached Storage Platform (HNAS), Hitachi Command Suite, VMware ESXi, Microsoft Azure, Microsoft SQL Server, Hitachi Virtual Storage Platform G SeriesEasy enterprise caching with RedisWe used to have most of our web apps accessing our database backend directly, and this was very resource consuming, especially in catalogs and details. This was more critical in our e-commerce storefront. With Redis, we were able to update our webs in order to cache all the queries with resources displayed frequently. In that way, we freed our servers of a huge load. The auto-expire function lets us use the Redis cache and not have to continuously monitor it.,It's an incredibly fast database with restrictions. It only has key-value combinations but good anyway. For caching, at the first request-> write to the cache and read from it since DB query is expensive. Persistence, It's like having your session active any time you want.,Software-based so the high availability configuration is a little bit tricky. The expire function is manually managed, so keep all your variables well documented. Better to create a Proxy service to deal with Redis values in order to isolate your app from the complexity (not too much anyway).,8,Positive: we used recycled hw for Redis and it worked just perfect because we had a lot of memory there. Positive: web experience increased because dynamic content is cached. Negative: migration to the cloud is not as smooth because features, such as data persistence, can be expensive.,Considering the key-value structure, we were able to fit all object model into a string in order to use a generic way to deal with cache'ing. A middleware is required in order to deal with serializing which is good because the App remains generic and for now we can use Redis until the next alternative is available. That means we can use the middleware with no changes for any app. Because of this, this middleware is the entry point for every single DB query.,No,Analyst Reports Third-party Reviews,We compared the actual architecture with cache against the old one with no cache and the difference was more than clear. We put the Redis server in a different network segment and the response time goes up. About cleaner code, the original app is mostly the same but with no dependencies of the DB interfaces. Now we have an API that we can switch at will handling all the complexity. Of course, you have to expend some time developing this middleware but it's not a big deal. In the end, we have a cached DB - API - Apps combination that allowed us to increase concurrency with no major investment on infrastructure.,MongoDB, CouchDB and HBase,Oracle Database 12c, Microsoft Visual Studio Code, NodeRedis makes your application super fast.We are using Redis for one of our clients. We wanted to find a way to handle huge amounts of data for every user search and their MySQL was not able to handle it quickly. We were discussing going more toward NoSQL. After more R&D, we chose Redis. Now it is handling data in an excellent way. It's for a travel product where we are searching hotels and flight for queries given by users, and Redis is rocking here.,Handles huge data without any loss more number of request at same time node replication,Since this is in-memory database but when you use it as persistence DB then pricing will increase. Does not support query like SQL,10,Redis require minimum hardware to setup. It is very fast to read and write data compare to other database. Now it replacing traditional data store.,We are using Redis database to improve the performance of our application. Redis plays a major role in our application. It acts as a persistence database as well as a cached database and we are using it for the distributed queuing system. It reduces our development time and database maintenance time, and requires very little maintenance time on the server.,No,Price Product Features Product Usability Product Reputation Prior Experience with the Product Third-party Reviews,Yes, Redis has a very simple and easy architecture. It is compatible with many languages. It provides speed and scalability which every software developer love to implement in their application. Currently, we are using Redis with Elixir, Nodejs and Python, and we feel Redis has a reliable network connection and concurrency among every API.,MongoDB and CouchDB,Google Cloud SQL, Elasticsearch, Google Compute EngineRedis is the DB you didn't know you need.We are starting to move towards using Redis as our primary storage for performance and simplicity reasons. We have been using it for the last 5 years as a Caching and Session storage mechanism, but last year we started to implement it across multiple services.,High Performance. Compared to other similar technologies Redis is blazing fast. Built-in Data Structures. Redis facilitates the creation of Counts, Leaderboards, & Logs. Scale Out. Other technologies claim to do Active-Active replication but while rebalancing, the Cluster goes irresponsive. With Redis, this does not happen and requests are still being served.,Management console still not quite polished. No built-in GUI for Debugging keys and values. Pricing model.,10,Reduced cost over other technologies but still not cheap enough to make an impact. No easy way to look at the raw data from a GUI. CLI access is required to debug which is not always available for developers. Dramatically reduced the response times for a positive impact on users interactions.,Redis, being our in-memory first storage, has forced us to rethink how we design applications for performance at an even larger scale which has translated into better user interactions and better monetization.,Yes,Product Features Product Usability Product Reputation Analyst Reports Third-party Reviews,Redis has definitely impacted the performance of our applications for the better. It's definitely harder to write code for Redis that it is for other NoSQL databases, but the tradeoff makes it a no brainer.,Couchbase Data Platform, MongoDB and Amazon DynamoDB,Amazon DynamoDB, Couchbase Data Platform, MongoDBWindows, Linux, Mac
Redis
170 Ratings
Score 9.1 out of 101
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Redis
170 Ratings
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Score 9.1 out of 101

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August 27, 2019

Redis is battle-tested

Score 9 out of 10
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We use Redis as a distributed cache and distributed lock for our microservice environment. We have so many machines performing jobs that it's hard to make sure no task gets dropped or accidentally gets performed twice. And that's where Redis comes in--to store the global state or what jobs have been done in a fast, reliable way.
  • Helpful customer support.
  • Reasonable pricing.
  • Keeps Redis software secure and up-to-date quietly in the background.
  • Replies from customer support via could be a little faster. We're on the basic plan, and it can take up to 2 business days--it's not fast enough when your bugs need to be solved right away.
Honestly, I think whenever you need an in-network cache for a distributed system, Redis is a rock-solid option. There are no gotchas. It has been battle-tested by most engineering organizations over the past decade. And Redis Labs is the most experienced and cheapest provider for hosting it. It's not much more expensive than hosting it yourself.
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Score 6 out of 10
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We use Redis in many capacities. We use it as a caching layer, as a shared heap, as a datastore for lock contention, as a queue, and as a primary datastore. It provides low latency storage that can be used to persist data between web requests. The data structures available allow us to use it to manage contended data in a safe and predictable fashion.
  • Fast key value store
  • Serializable concurrent usage (by virtue of being single-threaded)
  • Wide library support
  • Failover is terrifying and its safety guarantees are misleading
  • Large sets (> 500k entries) have noticeable performance degradation on what is advertised to be a O(1) query pattern
  • Hardware costs are high
If you need a caching layer it's great. I am hesitant to use it as a canonical data store. If you're okay losing data, then it's hard to beat. Additionally, cold/hot data patterns are not very useful in Redis, as all the data still has to reside in memory. You'd be better off with Redis as a hot cache and storing cold data somewhere better designed for that.
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Score 10 out of 10
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We leverage Redis as our L2 centralized cache to hold frequently accessed data such as user ids, account balances, and other metadata. It is used across our entire organization for various software services and projects. For us, the ease of spinning up an instance and having it "Just work!" is what is appealing. We don't have the luxury of hiring Redis administrators, but since our use case isn't too complex, a hosted version works just fine for us. This should speak to the flexible usability with the product.
  • It's easy to manage.
  • It fits most simple caching use cases.
  • Can be clustered.
  • Highly configurable.
  • Clustering can be easier to set up.
  • Sharing data can be challenging.
It's a great solution for simple and centralized caching layers, and you don't want a lot of overhead. Be sure Redis is the right product for your application's behaviors. Sharing data can be challenging. You will have to think about how to deal with that in the future. I used a hosted Redis version, and although there was noticeable "ping latency" vs a localize instance, the latency was within our acceptable response window.
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Score 5 out of 10
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Verified User
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Redis is currently being used in silo within my company. Our department was one of the first groups to use it as part of the software modernization initiative.
  • Caching strategy
  • Redis is not a panacea for fast and quick access to the frequently used data. There were times the development team had to go back to JVM cache to achieve the use case.
  • Maintaining Redis as a separate persistence has its price ( in operation and maintenance).
  • HA and DR was a biggest challenge with the widespread adoption of Redis
Don't expect Redis to replace your SQL/ NoSQL persistence layer altogether. It's very tempting to think that Redis can turbo boost your web application to Utopia, but be very judicious in selecting what Redis can do for you. There is always a price to bring an additional component into your ecosystem.
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September 24, 2019

Perfect performing cache

Score 9 out of 10
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We use it for high-speed cache, data storage for short periods of time, and it is ideal for immediate access to the leaderboard.
  • Speed.
  • Ease of use.
  • Variety of use cases.
  • Support faster SSL access, currently bring performance down by 50% with SSL.
  • Cost - Most providers not cheap.
  • Native support to access search through a variety of data formats.
Redis is well suited for timed caches. Without it, they would require more complex DB solutions. It is very reliable and takes less than 15 lines of code to write a sophisticated solution.
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Score 10 out of 10
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Verified User
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It is used for the whole organization for caching and performance. We avoid hitting the DB in a factor of more than 100x, at a lower cost.
  • Key-value access, very fast.
  • Caching - either using hashmaps or simple values.
  • The Python package elastic DSL is somehow incomplete.
  • Moving from a Python client to Redis 2 to Redis 3 is a mess.
Redis is good for caching and helps you to avoid hitting the DB. It offers a key-value store where you can put references to objects or temporary values (counters) that will later go to the DB.

Redis isn't as suited for complex objects or serialized data that takes a lot of space. With the milions of users, costs would go way up.
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Score 9 out of 10
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Verified User
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Redis provides support for database analysis and integration of many functions and programs. It is mainly used by our backend team and data analyst. It helped us to grow and expand our business a lot. The tools they provide for the system are the best thing for our organization. Our whole organization is fond of using it and is praiseworthy by our whole team. Many projects that we have done are due to Redis.
  • Introduction to new things like sorted list and hyper logs.
  • Speed of deployment for programs.
  • Data structure it has given.
  • Data scaling
  • User interface
Redis supports different kinds of data structure like sorted list, geospatial indexes with radius queries, and streams, etc. It helps us show usable data to our customers.
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Score 10 out of 10
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We use Redis as our back end database. It greatly improved performance at a reduced cost.
  • Scalability
  • Database performance
  • redundancy
  • Technical support
  • Migration from other database structures
  • Pricing
Having enterprise performance for a fraction of the cost. Great for migrating off of on-prem database server to cloud.
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Score 9 out of 10
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We're using Redis in our development department, as a layer on top of regular databases (MongoDB, MySQL), as cache, and for other critical data storage.
  • The main point: speed.
  • Easy to use and integrate with the rest of the components of our system.
  • Full-text search support
  • GUI tools
  • Pricing
I think it is perfect for managing temporary auth tokens and for caching.
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September 10, 2019

Great experience with Redis

Score 10 out of 10
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We use Redis to store non-critical persisted data such as sessions, cache fragments, task execution tombstones. Furthermore, we use it to link two systems that are written in different programming languages, using a queue as a connector.
  • Lightweight
  • Easy to setup & configure
  • Great documentation
  • Great community
  • Easy to use yet powerful
  • Not so simple to configure an AUTH to connect to the service
  • Not so simple to scale it horizontally
Not appropriate as primary data storage, but super appropriate as secondary data storage to support every server application on the side of a SQL/relational database.
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Score 9 out of 10
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The R&D department uses Redis as 'in-memory' hot data storage (data storage layer of a machine learning big data architecture).
  • Low latency
  • Support hundreds of connections
  • Significant learning curve
  • Could be costly if not designed right
Good for big data storage architectures.
Less suitable if persistence is required.
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Score 10 out of 10
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In Anzu technologies Pvt Ltd we used Redis for multiple reasons. We developed a social app which allows the user to bookmark the video and internet content. Performance was an important factor so we implemented user timelines using Redis sorted sets. We implemented the whole notification system using Redis. Our developed micro services architecture is using Redis. Caching was another common challenge where Redis performed very well. We just love Redis.
  • Caching
  • Instant response
  • Easy to use
  • Very light footprint
  • Nested JSON indexing
  • Fragmentation
  • Nothing else
Redis hyperlog, bloom filters are much lighter than sorted sets for different business use cases. Streams are a complete replacement for the Kafka data pipeline.
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May 20, 2019

Redis analysis

Score 8 out of 10
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We use it as a service. With it, we have developed libraries for rate limiting, ETL job flow coordination, and counters.
  • Atomic counters
  • Cache colocated with other services that require low latencies
  • Automatic memory management
  • CLI could be improved
  • Configuration management
  • Replication and snarfing
It all depends and the scale of the application and the scale/size of the data set. Fast key-value lookups fit very well in the Redsis model.
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May 15, 2019

Overview of Redis

Score 7 out of 10
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We use Redis as a cache, inter-process communication mechanism and queue system. It is used by our IT team, and it helps us solve technical issues.
  • Very high performance
  • Low Latency
  • High Reliability of data via clustering and disk backups
  • Data protocol can be more compact
Great as as cache & queue, not so great for storing large blocks of data.
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Score 8 out of 10
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Used only by engineering for our main production application. We use a Ruby based job system named Sidekiq that uses Redis as its backing store.
  • Lots of versatility. We use it as a dumb store for string payloads, but can store a bunch of other data structures also.
  • Easy to set up
  • Persistence support isn't great. RDB is useless for our case (job system). AOF has *huge* performance issues, particularly when reading the file on startup after a failure.
Well suited: Job system (with Sidekiq), Cache, Pubsub for short-lived messages.
Less appropriate: Anything where durability matters.
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May 02, 2019

A Perfect Fit

Score 9 out of 10
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Redis is used across our product offering as a user session store. It allows for very quick access to user session information and has been very reliable, serving our needs well.
  • Session storage.
  • It's extremely fast.
  • Reliable.
  • Nothing to suggest. It has fit our needs perfectly.
It has been very well suited for user session storage/access.
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Score 10 out of 10
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Our organization uses Redis for two main tasks at our organization. First, Redis is used as a traditional in-memory key/store warehouse for a cache system that contains over 400 million items, on average. Using Redis with modern DDR4 memory, we have seen incredible latency savings when it comes to keystore look-ups. Second, we use Redis to manage a distributed queue, such that numerous worker nodes can subscribe to tasks and complete them in an organized way.
  • Key/Value datastore. Redis is incredibly fast when it comes to simple "phone book-style" lookups.
  • Queue orchestration and management when there are many nodes in a system that need to all be on the same page.
  • Dead-simple installation process. It takes about 3 minutes to install Redis and get the service started.
  • I am unable to come up with any legitimate cons, but one thing to note is that Redis, by default, will be installed with no password, leaving it open to the world if the host is not locked-down with a firewall.
Redis is the perfect tool if you are looking to increase the speed of a key/value datastore or cache, as well as centralizing your queue management tasks to a dead-simple and incredibly fast database.

That said, it is not well-suited to tasks that have historically been reserved for relational datastores like MySQL or Postgres. Redis lacks relational database features and does not have a dynamic language like SQL to interact with.
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Adam Stern profile photo
Score 9 out of 10
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We are currently using Redis to store sets of object-based information and lists. We query an external system and generate lists in Redis based on the query responses. Because Redis is great at set operations this speeds up the time it takes to make set-based calculations. This Redis cluster supports the a large aspect of the whole application.
  • Redis is easy to install and maintain.
  • Redis is very fast, especially with set operations.
  • Redis is cost effective.
  • Clustering, especially with multiple write nodes, can be difficult to configure.
  • Configuring extremely high availability can be difficult.
Redis is great at fast operations, especially set-based operations. It is great as an object storage mechanism, such as a cache server or a fast key-value object store. Redis is easily installed and maintained, and setting up clustered instances isn't too terrible. Because the basic installation is open source, it is easy to experiment with before deciding to go with Redis long term.
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Bagaskara Wisnu Gunawan profile photo
Score 10 out of 10
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Redis is a vital part of our organization as it enables us to process a whole load of queues that our tools have to process. It provides so much value for us since most of our tools require queues to call APIs, etc. We used Redis because of its simplicity of setup and its fast performance. We loved Redis and sure you'd love it too!
  • Quick and Easy Setup
  • Fast Performance
  • Does its job well!
  • Setting up a cluster in Redis is a bit confusing and hard for the first time.
It simply has a lot of use cases, but, for our case, we always use Redis for our Laravel queue driver and also for our application's cache driver because it runs so fast and we just couldn't ignore that. We use Redis for dispatch Jobs, storing the cache, working on queues, etc.
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Score 10 out of 10
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We use redis and recommend for our clients. The key areas Redis outsteps all others are:
1) Scalability
2) Unique and flexible key value db structure
3) They use Ssd Flash for their instances

They also provide session management capabilities to be implemented in any huge projects without much headache. Their db instance also provides a high number of read write per second, which makes it a leader.
  • Session Management
  • Key value pair DB structure
  • High scalability
  • Flash instances
  • Failover Replicas
  • Data Consistency
Redis is particularly suited when you want to mesh millions of data and get a unique statistics or a child dataset out of it. Then Redis is the only viable product with the highest number of read and write per second. It increases my speed drastically so that I am able to put 10k records per second and successfully retrieve at same speed.
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Rahul Chaudhary profile photo
December 13, 2018

Redis is goooood!!!

Score 10 out of 10
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Verified User
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Redis is a basic, but extremely fast, key-value storage. We made a decision to use Redis because our use case didn't require a full blown database. We needed something to hold the data temporarily and loss of that data wouldn't lead to any issues. Redis was perfectly fitting our use case, and since then we are a bunch of happy Redis users.
  • Being a non-SQL database, it does not require any structure. Perfect for unstructured data like key-value pairs.
  • Redis is extremely fault tolerant. As soon as we write a record, it gets saved to the disk, without any performance issues.
  • Redis is very lightweight. In docker it takes less than 30MB, so it is so easy to run multiple containers in cluster without taking too much power.
  • Redis has a very good query API, and they are in their website each operation is clearly mentioned with its time complexity. This gives you a clear picture of performance. We didn't in fact do any performance testing because we trusted their site with all the information.
  • Redis has a very strong community around it. We have never found an issue for which a solution didn't exist beforehand.
  • A cluster in Redis was a little hard to understand and deploy, but this is a one time thing to learn, no worries.
Redis is extremely well suited for storing key-value kind of data. Flat and static values are around which they are built. There is no headache of indexing, or maintaining formats like other databases have.

I can also vouch for Redis's pub/sub notification. You can basically set expiration or event hooks around your keys, and Redis will trigger a notification for those events.

But Redis is ill-suited for treating it as a proper database. For instance, this is not a replacement for elasticsearch or mongo.

To assess if you need Redis, in my opinion, just think if you need to query values. If yes, don't use redis. If you are only concerned with key operations, then go with Redis.
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Bob Bennett profile photo
Score 10 out of 10
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Verified User
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Redis is being leveraged to address big data, temporal data and session state challenges across the software stack. New opportunities to leverage it are continually being investigated and identified. It addresses data consistency and concurrency issues and provides amazing speed to what could be slower operations if handled without it.
  • Cache speed
  • Support for high volume of transactions with elegant handling of data sets
  • Ease of use - well structured and easy to implement
  • Price per shard is a bit high but over all there are no issues worth mentioning
  • I've heard some wishing it supported complex queries but this is asking the solution to support operations it wasn't intended for
Redis is well suited for:
  • Big data manipulation
  • Temporal data index structures
  • Distributed solutions
  • Publish/Subscribe model based solutions
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Score 8 out of 10
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We used to have most of our web apps accessing our database backend directly, and this was very resource consuming, especially in catalogs and details. This was more critical in our e-commerce storefront. With Redis, we were able to update our webs in order to cache all the queries with resources displayed frequently. In that way, we freed our servers of a huge load. The auto-expire function lets us use the Redis cache and not have to continuously monitor it.
  • It's an incredibly fast database with restrictions. It only has key-value combinations but good anyway.
  • For caching, at the first request-> write to the cache and read from it since DB query is expensive.
  • Persistence, It's like having your session active any time you want.
  • Software-based so the high availability configuration is a little bit tricky.
  • The expire function is manually managed, so keep all your variables well documented.
  • Better to create a Proxy service to deal with Redis values in order to isolate your app from the complexity (not too much anyway).
Redis is a specialized key-value store, so it's best suited for session variables storage and cache'ing. Redis helps you identify database queries that are repeated exactly the same (for instance, combo lists, product catalogs, configurations, etc).

Redis is atomic, that means you don't have to deal with variables to being blocked to ensure concurrency. So it's great for dashboards, leaderboards, and apps like that.

Redis is not a common database, so don't use it as your repository for data entry or visualization. Yes, it's fast but not that way.
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Guljar Prasad profile photo
Score 10 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
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We are using Redis for one of our clients. We wanted to find a way to handle huge amounts of data for every user search and their MySQL was not able to handle it quickly. We were discussing going more toward NoSQL. After more R&D, we chose Redis. Now it is handling data in an excellent way. It's for a travel product where we are searching hotels and flight for queries given by users, and Redis is rocking here.
  • Handles huge data without any loss
  • more number of request at same time
  • node replication
  • Since this is in-memory database but when you use it as persistence DB then pricing will increase.
  • Does not support query like SQL
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Score 10 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
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We are starting to move towards using Redis as our primary storage for performance and simplicity reasons. We have been using it for the last 5 years as a Caching and Session storage mechanism, but last year we started to implement it across multiple services.
  • High Performance. Compared to other similar technologies Redis is blazing fast.
  • Built-in Data Structures. Redis facilitates the creation of Counts, Leaderboards, & Logs.
  • Scale Out. Other technologies claim to do Active-Active replication but while rebalancing, the Cluster goes irresponsive. With Redis, this does not happen and requests are still being served.
  • Management console still not quite polished.
  • No built-in GUI for Debugging keys and values.
  • Pricing model.
Redis is well suited for applications with well-defined data usage within the NoSQL space, that is counters, queues, leaderboards, time-based, key-value hashes, or for anything that requires many secondary indexes. Still, for a tabular view, a relational DB would make more sense. In the case of full-blown JSON lookup, maybe other NoSQLs could perform as well as Redis.
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Feature Scorecard Summary

Performance (62)
9.3
Availability (62)
8.8
Concurrency (61)
8.8
Security (57)
6.6
Scalability (62)
8.6
Data model flexibility (55)
7.7
Deployment model flexibility (55)
8.0

About Redis

According to the vendor, Redis is an in-memory multi-model database that supports multiple data structures such as strings, hashes, lists, sets, sorted sets with range queries, bitmaps, hyperloglogs and geospatial indexes with radius queries. Redis has built-in replication, Lua scripting, LRU eviction, transactions and different levels of on-disk persistence, and provides high availability and automatic partitioning with Redis Cluster.

Redis combines in-memory, schema-less design with optimized data structures and versatile modules that adapt to your data needs. The result is an adept, high performance, multi-purpose database that scales easily like a simple key/value data store but delivers sophisticated functionality with great simplicity, according to the vendor.

Redis also enables data persistence and high availability through replication and backups. Redis Enterprise is built from the ground up to serve as a system of record for any application.

Redis Features

NoSQL Databases Features
Has featurePerformance
Has featureAvailability
Has featureConcurrency
Has featureSecurity
Has featureScalability
Has featureData model flexibility
Has featureDeployment model flexibility
Additional Features
Has featureIntegrated modules
Has featureActive-Passive Geo Distribution
Has featureCluster Architecture
Has featureLinear Scaling
Has featureDurability
Has featureBackup and Disaster Recovery
Has featureReliability

Redis Screenshots

Redis Video

Redis Downloadables

Redis Integrations

Apache Spark, OpenShift, CData, Pivotal Cloud Foundry

Redis Competitors

Pricing

Has featureFree Trial Available?Yes
Has featureFree or Freemium Version Available?Yes
Has featurePremium Consulting/Integration Services Available?Yes
Entry-level set up fee?Optional

Redis Support Options

 Free VersionPaid Version
Phone
Live Chat
Email
Forum/Community
FAQ/Knowledgebase
Social Media
Video Tutorials / Webinar

Redis Technical Details

Deployment Types:On-premise, SaaS
Operating Systems: Windows, Linux, Mac
Mobile Application:Apple iOS, Android, Windows Phone, Blackberry, Mobile Web
Supported Countries:Global
Supported Languages: https://redis.io/clients