Redis Reviews

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Reviews (51-75 of 75)

Anonymous | TrustRadius Reviewer
March 21, 2019

Redis is a hammer in search of a nail.

Score 10 out of 10
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In our organization, Redis is being used as a temporary cache for ephemeral data. This solves the problem of needing to store cached data in a centralized place that is accessible by multiple devices and can be retrieved quickly. In general, nothing is stored in Redis that can't be reproduced from another resource on demand. For example, if we have a process that creates summaries of data from multiple data sources and is costly or very time consuming, we would cache those results in Redis for an appropriate period of time to make it available to other applications in a timely manner without having to rerun the original process. This reduces the time/cost normally incurred to review that data set.
  • Speed: Redis is, generally speaking, very fast. I typically place Redis somewhere within my internal network so the major factor in the speed of retrieving data is the size of the data cached.
  • Configuration: Redis is very configurable to the point where you can utilize it as simply as a single instance running with no backups to a multi-tiered cluster running with permanent storage, data backups, and replication.
  • Documentation: Redis has done a good job of documenting all of its capabilities as well as providing guidance in terms of what client libraries exist to help the developer's application(s) interface with it.
  • I, as a rule, don't use Redis for persistent data, but it would be nice if Redis had an option to persist data to another data source such as MySQL or PostgreSQL.
  • This is more a wish list item than a con but, it would be nice to have the ability to configure Redis as a write-through proxy. This is generally done by having a processor processes write-data to Redis, another process then reads the data from Redis and writes it to a database, and then finally the keys that have been written are flushed out of Redis.
Redis is well suited for storage of ephemeral data that could be used by multiple processes. For example, a multi-server website that sits behind a load balancer could use Redis to store session information that might typically be stored on the filesystem. This would allow all the website nodes to share session information without having to resort to sticky sessions.

I generally try to avoid using Redis as a primary data source for critical data.
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Anonymous | TrustRadius Reviewer
May 21, 2019

Enhancement of Data Structure

Score 9 out of 10
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Redis provides support for database analysis and integration of many functions and programs. It is mainly used by our backend team and data analyst. It helped us to grow and expand our business a lot. The tools they provide for the system are the best thing for our organization. Our whole organization is fond of using it and is praiseworthy by our whole team. Many projects that we have done are due to Redis.
  • Introduction to new things like sorted list and hyper logs.
  • Speed of deployment for programs.
  • Data structure it has given.
  • Data scaling
  • User interface
Redis supports different kinds of data structure like sorted list, geospatial indexes with radius queries, and streams, etc. It helps us show usable data to our customers.
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Anonymous | TrustRadius Reviewer
May 18, 2019

Some points about using Redis in small and medium products

Score 9 out of 10
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We're using Redis in our development department, as a layer on top of regular databases (MongoDB, MySQL), as cache, and for other critical data storage.
  • The main point: speed.
  • Easy to use and integrate with the rest of the components of our system.
  • Full-text search support
  • GUI tools
  • Pricing
I think it is perfect for managing temporary auth tokens and for caching.
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Anonymous | TrustRadius Reviewer
April 24, 2019

Instant database for instant user experience

Score 10 out of 10
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In Anzu technologies Pvt Ltd we used Redis for multiple reasons. We developed a social app which allows the user to bookmark the video and internet content. Performance was an important factor so we implemented user timelines using Redis sorted sets. We implemented the whole notification system using Redis. Our developed micro services architecture is using Redis. Caching was another common challenge where Redis performed very well. We just love Redis.
  • Caching
  • Instant response
  • Easy to use
  • Very light footprint
  • Nested JSON indexing
  • Fragmentation
  • Nothing else
Redis hyperlog, bloom filters are much lighter than sorted sets for different business use cases. Streams are a complete replacement for the Kafka data pipeline.
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Anonymous | TrustRadius Reviewer
April 18, 2019

Redis is fast and just works!

Score 9 out of 10
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In our project (high load web application with 10k+ users) we used Redis as a user session store, as a distributed cache for web front end servers (with PubSub notifications for changes propagation), and for notification service.
  • PubSub notifications: easy to use and just works.
  • Redis has a lot of different data structures and it's easy to find the best one for any problem.
  • Simple lightweight protocol.
  • It just works and works fast!
  • Single threaded nature of Redis can hurt if you not following best practices. For example, small values, don't use heavy blocking commands.
  • Expiration can be set only on a key level, and cannot be set for a hash item.
Best scenarios: distributed caching, session storage, and PubSub scenarios in the distributed environment.
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Anonymous | TrustRadius Reviewer
April 18, 2019

Don't look for any other tool for caching if you know about Redis

Score 10 out of 10
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Redis is our primary caching database. We cache most of our intermediate results for backup and scan operations using Redis. Of late, we have also been using it as a message queue. The performance is excellent and features like automatic failover and cluster management are very helpful. All necessary data structures like lists, maps, etc. are supported.
  • Automatic failover
  • Exhaustive set of data structures
  • If you want some simple messaging service, Redis pub/sub is excellent.
  • It's difficult to understand the use cases initially. The website should talk about "why Redis" first, then "how".
Caching is its primary use case. If you need lightweight pub/sub support, then Redis is good.
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Anonymous | TrustRadius Reviewer
April 17, 2019

Our experience with Redis Enterprise

Score 8 out of 10
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We have a country wide application for generation of an Electronic Way bill for the specific consignment/movement of goods from one place to another, either inter-state or intra-state and of value more than INR 50,000, required under the current GST regime in India typically showing the names of the consignor and consignee, the point of origin of the consignment, its destination, and route. We have specifically used Redis for Caching of user profile information used for authentication of the supplier, recipient, and the transporter. Redis has also been used to cache the Items and their Codes. In the future we also propose to use Redis for authentication and session management. The e-Way Bill replaces the Way Bill, which was a physical document and existed during the VAT regime for the movement of goods. The countrywide roll-out of the e-way bill system is targeted to reduce tax evasion with proper invoicing of the goods and to stop the practice of bogus invoicing of goods. It also plays an important part in the tracking of Goods with the use of robust technology like (RFID) Radio Frequency Identification Devices. Redis was implemented as a cache for all transporter data stored on the GSTN (Good and Services Tax Network). When a transporter entered their GSTIN (Goods and Services Tax ID Number) number into the system, their data was fetched from the cache and used to populate the bulk of the e-way bill.
  • Adoption of Redis, gave us the ability to realize our goal of digitally transforming the process of filing returns, generating bills, and tracking the movement of goods across states.
  • Using Redis Enterprise, we were able to reduce the time it took to generate an e-way bill by more than 85%. Just as important, we were able to dramatically reduce the burden on our SQL database and API calls.
  • Highly available persistent caching solution recognized for its seamless compatibility with Microsoft SQL Server and Consistent end-to-end response times below 40ms.
  • Flexible data structures and commands for efficient application in use cases beyond caching.
  • Session management is currently being handled in memory by our SQL server, but as the number of concurrent sessions during peak times moves from today’s average of 50,000 to an expected 100,000, we’ll need to implement more efficient session and authentication management likely within Redis Enterprise.
  • Manage the complexity of data in many different structures ranging from relational, to logs, to raw text. Handling of Streaming data, large volume of transactions/requests and data movement.
  • The functionalities like Joins (inner/outer join), Set operations (Union/Intersect/Minus), Transactions, Full ANSI SQL support, Constraints (like RDBMS) are not easily supported.
Redis has its advantages in the 3Vs viz. Volume – Scale from TB to Zeta Bytes (Billion TB), Variety – Manages the complexity of data in many different structures –Ranging from relational, to logs, to raw text and Velocity –Streaming data, large volume of transactions/requests and data movement. Redis is ideally suited for data caching, authentication and session management. Redis' advantage is in handling Scale, Performance and Flexibility (schema-less). It has also has its advantages in Replication of every data element to another node and Sharding and Partitioning so as to Distribute data across nodes in a "share nothing" approach.
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Anonymous | TrustRadius Reviewer
April 09, 2019

Redis: More than just cache

Score 10 out of 10
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Redis is used as a cache layer for our high read data as well as a database layer for write-intensive data. It's used in the entire engineering department as the de-facto caching layer for all services being built. The read and write speeds are unmatched because of the simplicity of the design.
  • Simple Key Value storage
  • Easy interface compared to other databases
  • Reliable performance characteristics
  • Redis needs better distributed support. I know this is not the point, but a distributed Redis with some CAP tradeoffs would be useful
  • Redis should be more clear on its pooling capabilities. Should you use a pool or just use a single connection?
  • It would be nice if Redis had a better CLI
Good for key value storage. Simple as that. If you need something that has relational data or need more complex data structures, don't use Redis.
If you need something that can be written and read by multiple services, that is as fast as possible, use Redis. The simplicity is its biggest strength, and making it more complex will just ruin the product.
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Anonymous | TrustRadius Reviewer
March 27, 2019

Redis Review

Score 10 out of 10
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Redis is being used extensively by our Web/Cloud department, of which I am a part of. We use Redis essentially for cache'ing but we pretty much try to use it for as much as we possibly can. Almost any information retrieval that we can offload to Redis will save as money, as well as reducing our response times. That is, any time we know that our data requirements are simple enough for a key/value setup to suffice, we use Redis - and in my opinion, anywhere we do not do this is a mistake.
  • Response time - the time taken to store or retrieve something from Redis is minuscule compared to most of the alternatives that we are aware of.
  • Value for the money - every time we offload data storage to Redis it saves us money, compared to using something like MongoDB or AWS.
  • Better documentation.
It is well suited for cache'ing or anything involving simple key-value data storage.
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Anonymous | TrustRadius Reviewer
March 18, 2019

Redis Review

Score 9 out of 10
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Redis is, at a high-level, an in-memory data store largely setup at a key-value store (although it can persist data to disk, and supports more complex data structures). Redis is generally used as part of a cache layer and has a number of additional use cases that it fills well (messaging and task queues).
  • Very, very fast due to the in-memory data store, which makes it highly scalable on rational-sized hardware.
  • Fills a number of different use cases: can build message broadcast, task queues, sorted sets (i.e. leaderboards), and database caching all with the same tool.
  • A robust third-party ecosystem of deployment options (like AWS) and libraries in a number of common programming languages.
  • Can be difficult to set up as it scales past a single write node.
  • While Redis can preserve state by writing to the file system in a couple of ways, it can still be cumbersome to standup a cluster with history.
For caching, task queues, and messaging, Redis is amongst the best implementation choices. Redis shines when very high throughput is required and very low query times are a necessity. Redis is also a great choice for storing data that can be automatically removed once it expires and should be stored somewhere else. While it is a data structure store, it is not a good choice for highly structured data that should be written to a disk instead (where a traditional RDBMS or NoSQL option is likely a better choice).
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Anonymous | TrustRadius Reviewer
March 13, 2019

We love Redis

Score 10 out of 10
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We use Redis for caching for our APIs. It's been rock solid since we made the switch from Memcached to Redis. Memcached was starting to be problematic for us, so Redis was a natural next choice for our caching needs. Aside from being stable and "just working" the tooling is far superior than other caching services I've used. It can be deployed easily as a docker container as well.
  • Cacheing APIs - this is where it shines for us
  • Quick in memory database of key value pairs
  • The tooling around Redis provides insight into what you are caching and provides easy methods to clear some caches and not all
  • New versions of the tooling are not easy to install compared to previous generations
Redis provides a great caching layer plain and simple. It's rock solid and just works. I'm not sure if my Redis instances have ever gone down.

I'd highly recommend it for caching or in memory key values stores. I'd consider other options if you have to store your data long term.
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Anonymous | TrustRadius Reviewer
May 20, 2019

Redis analysis

Score 8 out of 10
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We use it as a service. With it, we have developed libraries for rate limiting, ETL job flow coordination, and counters.
  • Atomic counters
  • Cache colocated with other services that require low latencies
  • Automatic memory management
  • CLI could be improved
  • Configuration management
  • Replication and snarfing
It all depends and the scale of the application and the scale/size of the data set. Fast key-value lookups fit very well in the Redsis model.
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Anonymous | TrustRadius Reviewer
May 15, 2019

Overview of Redis

Score 7 out of 10
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We use Redis as a cache, inter-process communication mechanism and queue system. It is used by our IT team, and it helps us solve technical issues.
  • Very high performance
  • Low Latency
  • High Reliability of data via clustering and disk backups
  • Data protocol can be more compact
Great as as cache & queue, not so great for storing large blocks of data.
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Anonymous | TrustRadius Reviewer
May 08, 2019

Redis: Simple to get started, scales OK, bad at durability

Score 8 out of 10
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Used only by engineering for our main production application. We use a Ruby based job system named Sidekiq that uses Redis as its backing store.
  • Lots of versatility. We use it as a dumb store for string payloads, but can store a bunch of other data structures also.
  • Easy to set up
  • Persistence support isn't great. RDB is useless for our case (job system). AOF has *huge* performance issues, particularly when reading the file on startup after a failure.
Well suited: Job system (with Sidekiq), Cache, Pubsub for short-lived messages.
Less appropriate: Anything where durability matters.
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Anonymous | TrustRadius Reviewer
May 02, 2019

A Perfect Fit

Score 9 out of 10
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Redis is used across our product offering as a user session store. It allows for very quick access to user session information and has been very reliable, serving our needs well.
  • Session storage.
  • It's extremely fast.
  • Reliable.
  • Nothing to suggest. It has fit our needs perfectly.
It has been very well suited for user session storage/access.
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Anonymous | TrustRadius Reviewer
April 20, 2019

Fast and furious

Score 8 out of 10
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Used on data processing by the Business Decision department.
  • Moves data fast.
  • Commands are user-friendly.
  • Expensive.
  • Expect to have more modules ready for the coder.
Good for structured data, but not sure about non-relational data.
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Anonymous | TrustRadius Reviewer
April 04, 2019

Redis Labs is great!

Score 9 out of 10
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Redis is used in our organization to cache data for fast data retrieval. It is being used across the whole organization. Redis reduces our API response times when requesting data.
  • Fast.
  • Reliable.
  • Regarding Redis Labs, the UI is not intuitive.
  • Redis Labs needs an API so I can automate tasks programmatically.
Redis is well suited if you need to cache data for fast retrieval.
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Rahul Chaudhary | TrustRadius Reviewer
December 13, 2018

Redis is goooood!!!

Score 10 out of 10
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Redis is a basic, but extremely fast, key-value storage. We made a decision to use Redis because our use case didn't require a full blown database. We needed something to hold the data temporarily and loss of that data wouldn't lead to any issues. Redis was perfectly fitting our use case, and since then we are a bunch of happy Redis users.
  • Being a non-SQL database, it does not require any structure. Perfect for unstructured data like key-value pairs.
  • Redis is extremely fault tolerant. As soon as we write a record, it gets saved to the disk, without any performance issues.
  • Redis is very lightweight. In docker it takes less than 30MB, so it is so easy to run multiple containers in cluster without taking too much power.
  • Redis has a very good query API, and they are in their website each operation is clearly mentioned with its time complexity. This gives you a clear picture of performance. We didn't in fact do any performance testing because we trusted their site with all the information.
  • Redis has a very strong community around it. We have never found an issue for which a solution didn't exist beforehand.
  • A cluster in Redis was a little hard to understand and deploy, but this is a one time thing to learn, no worries.
Redis is extremely well suited for storing key-value kind of data. Flat and static values are around which they are built. There is no headache of indexing, or maintaining formats like other databases have.

I can also vouch for Redis's pub/sub notification. You can basically set expiration or event hooks around your keys, and Redis will trigger a notification for those events.

But Redis is ill-suited for treating it as a proper database. For instance, this is not a replacement for elasticsearch or mongo.

To assess if you need Redis, in my opinion, just think if you need to query values. If yes, don't use redis. If you are only concerned with key operations, then go with Redis.
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Hugo Romani Cortes | TrustRadius Reviewer
March 30, 2018

Redis - memory is the new disk

Score 8 out of 10
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I used Redis in the context of an Airline company middleware implementation. At that time, we were looking for an efficient caching solution with the possibility to distribute data across nodes (i.e. sort of data grid without the complexity of a data grid).
Redis allowed us to build very fast a small cluster of nodes (4) serving as a cache for storing web sessions.
Because of additional features of Redis (pub/sub, in memory Keystore), Redis was also identified as non-critical storage for some data.
  • Redis is easy to learn and concepts are very simple. It's an in-memory storage with regular snapshots for data resiliency.
  • Redis offers the possibility to act as a cache with limited but strong eviction set policies. LRU is the most common one.
  • The pub/sub feature of Redis is an interesting alternative for efficient and fast data distribution when we don't need a central broker such as JMS. Obviously, it requires some analysis before choosing between the bunch of providers (JMS, Kafka, MQTT, AMQP, Redis, etc)
  • Redis is sponsored by Redislab which limit its functionalities. This is normal but they should push for a graphical tool for Redis monitoring. This tool is available for the enterprise edition, it would be nice to have a core version for the community
  • I don't know if Redis is available in containers, this might be interesting to have such capability
Redis fits perfectly when the cache is required or when fast data access is a criterion. With the community edition, we can build very fast and efficient cluster of data nodes with adequate persistent policy.

I don't recommend Redis if you are looking for something else than a key/value store. Even if Redis claims to be a "data structure server", you might face limitations while dealing with other data structures.
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Nitin Pasumarthy | TrustRadius Reviewer
October 09, 2017

Redis: Awesome in-memory key-value distributed CAP compliant store

Score 10 out of 10
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We use Redis for low latency repetitive point queries. To break it down:
  • Low latency: As it is in memory, saves on I/O
  • Repetitive: As part of ETL we use it to address resolution, .i.e. given an address, find a representative lat long for it. As millions of rows are ETLed every day, there is high chance that they repeat. Having in-memory helps again
  • Point queries: WHERE age BETWEEN 10 and 30 is a range query and WHERE age = 15 is a point query. We use it only for point queries
  • When dataset is small enough to fit in-memory and get full benefits of reduced I/O
  • Need of rich data structures for complex querying
  • Speed of in-memory store and durability by disk at the same time
  • Declarative querying like SQL
  • Tools for monitoring and identifying performance bottlenecks
  • Key schema design can be tricky and heavily impacts the performance (leading to key scans)
Good for:
  • Low latency queries are a must
  • Frequent point queries as it is a key-value store
  • Use awesome Redis Modules (Redis Search, Redis Neural Net, Redis ML, Redis-Secondary, Redis Graph)
Not suitable for (as far as I know):
  • When values are complex objects and not simple data structures. Document stores are better for those work loads
  • Huge data and not feasible (due to budget constraints) to scale up RAM
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Adam Lauer | TrustRadius Reviewer
May 24, 2016

Redis: A Caching Database on Steroids

Score 9 out of 10
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We use redis as a cheap, available, quick storage option. Think of it as a cache on steroids. It lets us store mass amounts of data and access it quickly. The best part is the access cost is not per demand, you are just paying what is hosting the redis clusters.
  • Quick lookup/interaction with data
  • Excellent key-value storage where everything is treated as a hashtable
  • Cheap alternative to other storage solutions
  • Mass amounts of storage is supported
  • The backup and recovery solutions are not ideal; recommend backing it with a more durable option
  • The spin up to find an optimal setup for performance takes time and testing
  • No super user friendly GUI application to interact with the data
This is best for needing to access data at a high volume quickly at a low cost. This is not the best option if you need high durability of the data and cannot suffer any data loss. Redis is perfect for key-value situations of data including a key being a hash and the value being a huge json object. It is not good when you need a more relational schema.
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Anonymous | TrustRadius Reviewer
March 16, 2018

Trust Redis: A Review on TrustRadius

Score 9 out of 10
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Redis was used internally by software development teams as part of a web application stack. Each development team was free to use alternate technologies, including none at all, but for teams with performance requirements, Redis was chosen to provide an in memory cache layer buffering web requests from directly hitting the database.
  • In memory caching
  • Fast read and write access
  • Data structure based API
  • Clustering and sharding
  • Self managing for high availability
  • Failover
Redis is great for application cache, internet cache, sharing sessions across stateless web servers. It also works well as a serializing channel for stream data. It has a pub-sub layer as well, which can be used to facilitate peer to peer data sharing. Because it's built as an in-memory store, it is not suitable for data durability.
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Anonymous | TrustRadius Reviewer
February 06, 2018

A good key-value\no SQL product

Score 8 out of 10
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We have tried using Redis to move from a relational DB to a key-value logic. In view of the use of a DB not SQL, it is certainly performant even if unlike other SQLs, it requires a little more reasoning about the proper analysis of the key value to be used and the way in which they are then interrogated.
  • key - value logic
  • no SQL structure
  • really speedy queries
  • need an initial implementation
  • without a correct key - value queries do not perform
  • need a change of the actual application to move from SQL to Redis
If you want to increase your database queries changing from SQL to Redis probably you can optimize your performance using in-memory cached by Redis, doing this you can have a better workload on SQL servers but you have to configure correctly your complete infrastructure. Furthermore, you need a little bit of time to test your calls with a stress test.
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Anonymous | TrustRadius Reviewer
March 16, 2017

Redis is great, and your application can be great too!

Score 10 out of 10
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We mostly use Redis as a cache for data flowing through a data processing pipeline. When we have surges of activity, we rely on redis to alleviate the stress on our pipeline and ensure that no messages are lost. We also use some of the features in Redis to synchronize our services across several servers.
  • Caching - that's what it's built to do, and it does it well.
  • Performance - pretty much everything happens in memory, so it's blazing fast.
  • Atomic operations - when you need a distributed counter, Redis is a great option for avoiding race conditions across services/servers.
  • Blocking calls - polling for changes kinda stinks, and Redis gives you the option to perform blocking calls that immediately return when data is ready.
  • Complex querying - Redis is not a relational database, and should not be used as one.
  • Clustering - this is always a complicated topic, but it could be made more simple.
For anything that requires a cache, redis has been a great option for me for several years. It can easily handle a huge volume of requests, making it a fantastic way to speed up a popular web application, for example. Being able to automatically expire entries after a certain amount of time helps reduce load caused by complex calculations or queries that use other data sources. It's simply fantastic.
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Anonymous | TrustRadius Reviewer
March 27, 2017

gets your job done fast, smooth and fast.

Score 10 out of 10
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We have a range of sensors that transmit data to our server and this data is stored in a MongoDB database; while it's stored we needed a way to transmit the data to our web application to generate live charts on the fly; to accomplish this we used redis coupled with socket.io since the application storing the data and the application generating the charts are seperate entities. Though there are other ways to accomplish this, redis has been really useful is helping us accomplish this.

Another place where we are using redis is for our caching, since we deal with high volumes of data, we use redis as a caching mechanism and it has done wonders for us.
  • Speed. The very fact that it is used for caching systems should verify that it must be really fast.
  • Pubsub. Though there might be alternatives that solve this problem as well, in our case redis did it accurately and without any data loss.
  • Redis has a couple of data types that aren't available in other systems. The most useful one according to me is lists; I haven't been able to take full advantage of this feature yet though.
  • Redis may not be for you if you want to deploy a cluster but don't have at least 5 different devices since it requires at least 3 masters and 2 slaves for the configuration to work.
  • The reason redis is really fast is because it resides in your RAM hence it might be a problem when you have an application that needs a lot of RAM and it has to share that with redis. This will depend on the size of your application, users using the applications and obviously the amount of RAM you have.
If you are dealing with an application that needs to serve high volumes of redundant data or feel that memcached isn't doing enough for you, then it's time to consider redis. Also, redis can be a great tool to communicate between different applications without creating interfaces that might take a lot of time build.
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Feature Scorecard Summary

Performance (68)
9.3
Availability (68)
8.7
Concurrency (67)
8.6
Security (62)
7.2
Scalability (68)
8.7
Data model flexibility (61)
8.3
Deployment model flexibility (61)
8.5

About Redis

According to the vendor, Redis is an in-memory multi-model database that supports multiple data structures such as strings, hashes, lists, sets, sorted sets with range queries, bitmaps, hyperloglogs and geospatial indexes with radius queries. Redis has built-in replication, Lua scripting, LRU eviction, transactions and different levels of on-disk persistence, and provides high availability and automatic partitioning with Redis Cluster.

Redis combines in-memory, schema-less design with optimized data structures and versatile modules that adapt to your data needs. The result is an adept, high performance, multi-purpose database that scales easily like a simple key/value data store but delivers sophisticated functionality with great simplicity, according to the vendor.

Redis also enables data persistence and high availability through replication and backups. Redis Enterprise is built from the ground up to serve as a system of record for any application.

Redis Features

NoSQL Databases Features
Has featurePerformance
Has featureAvailability
Has featureConcurrency
Has featureSecurity
Has featureScalability
Has featureData model flexibility
Has featureDeployment model flexibility
Additional Features
Has featureIntegrated modules
Has featureActive-Passive Geo Distribution
Has featureCluster Architecture
Has featureLinear Scaling
Has featureDurability
Has featureBackup and Disaster Recovery
Has featureReliability

Redis Screenshots

Redis Integrations

Apache Spark, OpenShift, CData, Pivotal Cloud Foundry

Redis Competitors

Pricing

  • Has featureFree Trial Available?Yes
  • Has featureFree or Freemium Version Available?Yes
  • Has featurePremium Consulting/Integration Services Available?Yes
  • Entry-level set up fee?Optional

Redis Support Options

 Free VersionPaid Version
Phone
Live Chat
Email
Forum/Community
FAQ/Knowledgebase
Social Media
Video Tutorials / Webinar

Redis Technical Details

Deployment Types:On-premise, SaaS
Operating Systems: Windows, Linux, Mac
Mobile Application:Apple iOS, Android, Windows Phone, Blackberry, Mobile Web
Supported Countries:Global
Supported Languages: https://redis.io/clients