Ubuntu Linux

Ubuntu Linux

Top Rated
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Score 8.9 out of 100
Top Rated
Ubuntu Linux

Overview

Recent Reviews

Ubuntu Pros and Cons

9 out of 10
May 12, 2021
In most of our virtual machines and servers we generally use Ubuntu Linux to address specific system requirements for clouds as well to …
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Power User OS

10 out of 10
May 10, 2021
Ubuntu Linux is used by employees in the organization who have elected to use it over the standard issue Macbooks. It allows us to have a …
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What is Ubuntu Linux?

Ubuntu Linux is a Linux-based operating system for personal computers, tablets and smartphones. There is also a Server version which is used on physical or virtual servers in the data center.

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What is Oracle Solaris?

Oracle Solaris is a Linux operating system which was originally developed by Sun Microsystems and became an Oracle product after the acquisition of Sun in 2010.

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Product Details

What is Ubuntu Linux?

Ubuntu Linux is a Linux-based operating system for personal computers, tablets and smartphones. There is also a Server version which is used on physical or virtual servers in the data center.


Ubuntu Linux Technical Details

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Comparisons

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Reviews and Ratings

 (259)

Ratings

Reviews

(1-25 of 42)
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Subhan Raj | TrustRadius Reviewer
Score 9 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
Well, if you're looking for a development environment for Software Development, Android Development, Web Applications etc, you can go 100% with the Ubuntu Linux, but if you want to be a Graphic designer, Video Editor, animator, Game developer etc, I would say not to go fully with Ubuntu, that's not because Ubuntu is not great in these tasks, but the lack of support of some proprietary software on the Ubuntu Linux, which makes is harder for a newcomer to work on the Ubuntu Linux.
Score 8 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
Ubuntu Linux works great for a lightweight, easy-to-learn and stand up distro of Linux. You really can't go wrong, and Canonical really supports this distro well with two channels: LTS (long-term support) and the more recent channel if you are more daring. I recommend LTS for all scenarios as it has been much more thoroughly tested for compatibility.
Score 9 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
When suited:

  • When you need a Linux based OS that respects your privacy.
  • For ML engineers.
  • For an easy to use interface.

When not suited:
  • For non power users go for windows e.g. for Business Analysts, Managers, etc.
  • If you extensively use Microsoft office go for Windows.
  • If you are a gamer, go for Windows.
Score 9 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
Best cases I see for Ubuntu is to manage cloud applications with its architecture. It is easy to implement on Linux based systems and is more safe and reliable in case of process management and virus attacks.
On the contrary it is not suitable to use for beginners who are familiar to work in a good GUI environment.
May 10, 2021

Power User OS

Score 10 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
If you're a power user and feel like the OS is too often in the way of your workflows, then Ubuntu Linux is a good choice, especially if you are constrained by locked down user environments and walled gardens. If all you need is a browser, then something simpler will suffice.
Score 8 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
If you have knowledge of how to use terminal, then you can complete work very very fast. Sometime the user may feel like they need a better UI. That is a problem because that new user might hesitate to start using Ubuntu Linux. But every good thing has a learning curve, so learning and using it is worth your time.
Gaurav Masand | TrustRadius Reviewer
Score 8 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
Cases where Ubuntu Linux is best suited:
  • When you want easy deployment of applications
  • When you want customizable systems to work on
  • When you don't like Windows in particular--it is the alternative
  • When you want to be a part of large community of developers using Ubuntu Linux and want a steep learning curve
April 13, 2021

Ubuntu as a developer

Balázs Kiss | TrustRadius Reviewer
Score 10 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
If somebody whishes to be an IT professional, learning the basics of Linux is amust. Ubuntu [Linux] is one of the most beginner-friendly, widely supported, easy-to-use-relative-to-the-fact-that-its-still-linux OS on the market. As somebody who learned the basics of UNIX/LINUX on Ubuntu, it was a very good experience. It is customizable, has a lot of improvements over the years, and live up to be a viable alternative to any modern OS in 2021 as well.
Score 10 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
For a regular not tech savvy user, Ubuntu [Linux] is a piece of cake once installed, and for the tech savvy, super simple to install. And even for the not as tech savvy it is easy.

Server specs don't need to be great, it'll run on anything, though what cpu/memory you'll need depends on your use case.
Mauricio E Gleizer | TrustRadius Reviewer
Score 10 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
Scenario 1 well suited: Companies that need to save on software expenses, especially micro and small.
Scenario 2 well suited: Companies that are more concerned with security in Information Technology, with large amounts of sensitive data.
Scenario 3 well suited: Beginners in software development / programming, who want a steeper and more demanding learning curve.

Less appropriate scenario 1: Gamers, especially professionals, who need to run the most modern and most demanding games with graphics cards.

Score 7 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
I usually recommend Ubuntu desktop software for people who are just beginning with Linux and have hardware that can handle it, as learning how the user interface works is relatively easy. I recommend Ubuntu server simply because we are experienced with it and are able to advise on setup and maintenance. I recommend Ubuntu also because it has a large user base that is active on the Internet, which means that help is usually available for even obscure-seeming problems.
However, for reviving older hardware, I often do not recommend Ubuntu because:
(a) later versions are exclusively 64-bit and (b) among Linux distributions, Ubuntu is usually heavy.
For people using older hardware, I usually recommend Puppy Linux versions that have been adapted from Ubuntu. I am perfectly happy to recommend Ubuntu for any people or organizations that primarily work on the Internet, however.
In many cases, Ubuntu is unsuitable simple because it does not run particular pieces of software designed for other operating systems (Windows, in particular). This is an special problem in many commercial enterprises that use proprietary or branded software. There are even some excellent open-source software packages that are available for Windows that are not for any form of Linux.
Score 10 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
Ubuntu [Linux], just like many Linux distributions runs on a variety of systems, supports deployment on to many different types of hardware, and is scalable. It has a rich package management system that is well developed and maintained which ensures compatibility with upgrades. It's low memory and disk footprint makes it our preferred choice for Linux distro.
Score 8 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
For an all purpose server, Ubuntu works quite well and includes all the common packages out of the gate. It is easy to set up and most system administrators are already knowledgable on how to use it. However, it's not a "lightweight" OS by any definition, with a large amount of packages going unused on the majority of VM's. If you're looking for a very lightweight, resource-nimble OS, look elsewhere.
Score 10 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
Ubuntu Linux is excellent if you need to run a LAMP server. It is also outstanding in serving vital network services, such as DHCP and DNS. It is very versatile, as a lot of free and open-source software requires some flavor of Ubuntu Linux to run on, and having a properly configured LAMP makes deployment a breeze.
One downside is that if you are not familiar with Ubuntu Linux, it can be very confusing; however, once you have a grasp of the concepts and fundamentals, it is a breeze to manage.
Score 9 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
I would say that Ubuntu Linux is a well rounded distribution for server and desktop needs. If you are looking for bleeding edge performance or packages you may want to look at a distribution that does rolling releases, but this is usually not needed in a business setting outside of HPC in my experience. The large selection of window managers allows for great customization when used in a desktop setting. We prefer to leave our servers without a GUI, obviously, for performance and resource reasons.
Score 9 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
You can definitely use Ubuntu in the enterprise environment as long as your stuff is open-source, however if you are working on super private stuff then it is definitely not the logical choice to make. If you are planning to use Linux as your desktop environment then there is just no better alternative in terms of speed to Ubuntu in the stable Linux market. So regardless of who you are, it is always a good option.
Score 9 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
We use Ubuntu for 75% of our workstations, 100% of our devs are running Ubuntu and this greatly improved their efficiency. Easily using Docker and Vagrant, for local environments to test their software. Departments that were heavily relying on Microsoft Office had a little bit harder transition. There is no way to run Excel Macro on Linux without at least losing a little bit of the functionality. There are alternatives, for example, Google Sheets can do similar things with javascript. Power users that navigated using key combinations had to relearn as well.
Score 10 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
Ubuntu Linux has such a strong user community that it is easy to justify using it as your chosen development platform. Any issues that you may encounter in migrating to Ubuntu have likely already been addressed by the community. In addition, developers will love the easy package management, making it trivial to leverage existing packages to make development quicker and easier. The package management helps users deal with dependencies without spending substantial time figuring out an endless chain of requirements just to get the package they want working. In short, Ubuntu Linux makes it faster and easier for developers to be productive.
Score 9 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
Ubuntu is definitely one of the friendliest Linux distros out there and can be a good OS replacement for computers both new and old. Older hardware benefits from a slight boost in performance when compared to Windows. There are plenty of applications that are free or low-cost available via Ubuntu's built-in software store that works very similarly to Microsoft's equivalent software and file formats are compatible.

One caveat is that these equivalent applications will perform most of the functionality the same but they are not an exact copy of Microsoft's software and some features may be unavailable. If you absolutely require a Microsoft product like Access, Microsoft SQL Server, Visio or Project, you'd best look elsewhere as there are currently no versions available for Linux. While you may be able to use Wine or PlayOnLinux to get the applications to run, your mileage may vary and a lot of time, research and tweaking will be required to make things work as expected.
Christian Shaheen | TrustRadius Reviewer
Score 7 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
Ubuntu Linux is well suited for any set-and-forget systems. It is easy to update (given a snapshot option) and has lots of good information/documentation online. I go straight to Ubuntu for just about any server application it has a package for. I still use and recommend Windows for file servers and desktops/general purpose machines. Ubuntu is also great in a budget situation. Since Ubuntu is based on Linux and is open sourced, the team maintain it doesn't charge licensing fees.
Score 10 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
If you are using low-horsepower hardware and open-source software will satisfy your business needs, Ubuntu is a great platform. If you are working with web-based applications, there's probably no reason Ubuntu won't work fine for you. For many server applications, the Ubuntu Server LTS (Long Term Support) distribution is excellent. However, if you are in an Apple-centric ecosystem, or are heavily invested in a Microsoft Office workflow, you may not find Ubuntu a good fit. It's notable that even on my Windows development machines I always have an Ubuntu virtual machine (or one running under Windows Subsystem for Linux) that I keep handy for web development tasks or other online work that may be awkward under Windows Powershell.
Score 10 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
The most common use for Ubuntu Linux is probably for web-based applications. It is fairly simple to install the LAMP stack (Linux, Apache, MySQL, PHP) which is used by many open source web-based applications. The Apache web server is one of the most commonly used web servers and is fast and stable.
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