Miro for Remote Instruction
February 10, 2022

Miro for Remote Instruction

Anonymous | TrustRadius Reviewer
Score 9 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User

Overall Satisfaction with Miro

I use Miro to support remote teaching in my classes. I have integrated it into our virtual conferencing system to support students' explorations and discussions by providing them with virtual manipulatives, shareable images, collaborative spaces for drawing and computing, and for sharing their work with their classmates. This is particularly effective for supporting the work of small groups as well as for doing whole-class presentations.
  • Supporting within-group collaboration
  • Providing a flexible space for many types of virtual interactions
  • Facilitating whole-group interactive presentations
  • It is a little tricky to embed Miro frames in other virtual spaces
  • Hand-written notes aren't selectable as entire words/images--only the constituent lines are selectable. Although this provides flexibility for editing, it also makes it difficult to modify entire blocks of text
  • The built-in table feature is difficult to use
  • Supports student learning and collaboration
  • Supports instructor presentation
  • Supports the creation and maintenance of virtual learning artifacts
The implementation of Miro is very flexible. It was easy to find resources to import into Miro as well as ways to set up and distribute the Miro resources to groups of students.
It was a bit tricky to figure out how to embed individual Miro frames into my school's virtual conferencing system. Each of my groups needs to have a link to their own section of the Miro board (i.e., their group's frame). It could be that my conferencing system was finicky about how it processed these links, but it took me a long time to get this integration working.
I have found Miro to be essential to support remote teaching and learning. It lets my students engage with each other--and the virtual learning tools--in a dynamic way that mimics what they would be doing in an in-person teaching setting. Although it's not quite as flexible or fast as doing things in person, it has some advantages, such as being able to keep a record of previous class work and discussions.

Do you think Miro delivers good value for the price?

Yes

Are you happy with Miro's feature set?

Yes

Did Miro live up to sales and marketing promises?

Yes

Did implementation of Miro go as expected?

Yes

Would you buy Miro again?

Yes

I tried several other similar apps--Limnu, awwapp, Jamboard, ExplainEverything, etc. Miro had considerably more functionality, more available integrations, the ability to create frames, the ability to be embedded in other virtual spaces, a responsive design, and much more. The other apps lacked many of these features and were less functional than Miro.
Miro is very well suited to modes of teaching that involve a combination of small-group exploration and whole-class presentation and discussion. This can be done by creating a frame for each small group as well as a separate frame for the instructor and creating a link to each frame for each group.