Amazon RDS Reviews

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Score 8.8 out of 101

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Reviews (1-25 of 29)

Alok Patwal profile photo
Score 10 out of 10
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As a POC, we had worked with Azure and GCP's databases as well. One problem with Azure is that it seems slow in supporting new versions of MySQL. With GCP Cloud SQL, the security configuration for the database was not as intuitive as in AWS. The UI in both Azure and GCP was better than RDS as it avoids page reloads when you are navigating through different components, and instead opens the linked component in the same page and makes the page horizontally scrollable as well. Still, we went with RDS because a lot of our services were already in AWS and we did not have a solid reason to go against it.
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Matthew King profile photo
Score 10 out of 10
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We originally were going to utilize EC2 instances for configuration and installing a database. This would require DBA knowledge as well as the need for more overhead within our configuration. This could be scripted, however; this adds so much more to what our end goal was going to require. Within Terraform, this would require startup scripts and certificates, RDS handled all of this for us and made a much more easily configurable infrastructure as code.
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Erlon Sousa Pinheiro profile photo
Score 8 out of 10
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Actually you can have most of these tools through AWS Relational Database Service as they are basically those technologies provided as a service. It is way better to have those products provided as a service through a huge and reliable infrastructure like AWS.
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Score 8 out of 10
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  • Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2)
Setting up your own database servers on EC2 instances is slower and more work. It also doesn't come with tech support for the database. It's usually best to use an AWS service for anything you can, rather than building your own.
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Score 10 out of 10
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MS-SQL Server in Azure costs more and/or is slower...but even if you were in a position where the costs were close, you'd still have the fact that Amazon Relational Database Service is more mature and resilient in the Cloud Managed Database environment to tip the scales toward Amazon RDS for me.
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Bob Smith profile photo
Score 10 out of 10
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It's hard to identify how Amazon RDS stacks up against the databases they support, because to install and use a relational database in a production environment you need a Database Administrator to help install, configure and manage. Amazon RDS keeps the details simple enough for anyone to get started and focused on what matters most (your business, not your configuration).
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Gabriel Samaroo profile photo
Score 10 out of 10
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Amazon Relational Database Service will probably give you everything you need from a traditional manual DB setup, except everything is managed for you. The only downside is having to pay the premium for the service; however, the trade-off of not having to deal with the intricacies involved with database administration, make it well worth it for most.
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Kyle Reichelt profile photo
Score 9 out of 10
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The only direct comparison that I have professionally would be from a past life where we ran Microsoft SQL Server on Microsoft Servers, and while I served as a technical liaison between a vendor and my customers, there were constant issues within my customers' technical teams when it came to resource management and scaling. I'm happy to not have that headache.

MongoDB isn't really a direct comparison to RDS (and arguably to PostgreSQL)... but I'm happy to be back with my nice, logical, relational database!
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Dylan Cauwels profile photo
Score 9 out of 10
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We mainly used RDS because our infrastructure was already up and running on AWS so the networking between the systems was quite easy to set up and manage. For our Azure infrastructure, we used their SQL database option instead for the same reasons. If AWS made it easier to use the professional tools provided with many SQL suites we would definitely prefer them over the competition, but until that day we will keep our RDS instances platform-specific.
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Dhruba Jyoti Nag profile photo
Score 8 out of 10
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RDS is a new way to go about database needs for organizations. As more and more enterprises move towards cloud-based design when creating their IT infrastructure, more and more they shed traditional on-premise heavyweight RDBMS systems and instead embrace cloud database services like RDS which save an amazing amount of money. Since it was one of the first offerings in the database as a service space, its adoption is also comparatively higher.
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Score 8 out of 10
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RDS implements the databases we were interested in and allows us to focus on the application and not the management. AWS handles setting up the server and the database as well as upgrading the software when necessary. Security is simple, using security groups to allow or deny access to the database. Overall, RDS provided quite a lot of value for the cost.
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Score 8 out of 10
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Amazon Relational Database Service manages MariaDB and MySQL, so if you need to use those databases, then Amazon Relational Database Service will manage everything from the installation to the incremental updates needed for operation. Not having to worry about maintaining a database cluster has saved countless hours and stress, allowing more development in revenue generating areas of our company
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Score 9 out of 10
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Amazon Relational Database is more reliable and effective than the one I am using. Amazon Relational Database has more storage capacity and is easily accessible. Amazon Relational Database has multiple options. Amazon Relational Database cloud services are excellent. From the installing to use, backup issues we can get resolved easily which I found more competitive than other available resources.
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Score 10 out of 10
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  • Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2)
Running our database on RDS has been a good option as we originally thought most of our database would be running on EC2 instances and they we needed root access to the machine. We found out that wasn't the case and just needed to change our mindset.
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Eric Mann profile photo
Score 9 out of 10
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  • SQL Azure
Our other application components are all hosted within Amazon's systems already, and the tight coupling of RDS with the security groups and virtual private cloud offerings made locking down privacy and security much easier than integrating with an outside provider. The deeper support for Postgres also made it easier to make the decision for Amazon as that database was higher on our wish list.
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Justin Schroeder profile photo
Score 8 out of 10
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Honestly, there aren't a lot of great alternatives to RDS, and most likely the real alternative is just running an instance on your local box. While lots of other services (like Rackspace) offer hosted database solutions, RDS in my opinion, is the clear winner on price, availability, and failover support.
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Dharma raju profile photo
Score 8 out of 10
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Automated snap-shotting every 24 hours is, again something that I could just set up in minutes with a few clicks, though we also backup on cron jobs to elsewhere, and, because of our industry we have a HUGE "forensic logs" that initially live in the database but get archived off every seven days. (We literally log every single API call between our front-end and our application servers, and the data structures that the APIs return.
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Anudeep Palanki profile photo
Score 10 out of 10
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  • Docker
Though you could get similar functionality using Docker, Amazon RDS offers a more comprehensive SaaS solution.

With Docker, you still need to have an EC2 instance to install the Docker and manage backup scripts using EC2 snapshots or S3. But RDS provides that solution out-of-box.

The advantage with Docker is the access to the VM. It allows for fine-tuning of the database unlike RDS.

Overall, if the database is not provided as RDS solution, Docker would be my backup solution.


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Valeri Karpov profile photo
Score 10 out of 10
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Redshift is massively scalable but has some limitations that we weren't willing to accept (no JSONB). It also has its own distinct flavor of SQL, and there isn't as much content online about Redshift's flavor of SQL versus postgres'. In the end, we just didn't need to kind of scale that redshift was designed for, so we went for RDS, because it was cheaper and simpler.
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Michael E. Gruen profile photo
Score 8 out of 10
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There really isn't a comparable service. Azure was surprisingly complicated to set up and crashed at odd points during a POC without much help. We looked at Rackspace to check it out, but as most of our infrastructure is in AWS, any benefit to Rackspace's offerings were nullified by keeping it all in one place.
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Craig Nash profile photo
Score 4 out of 10
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I try not to compare services, as I know that every project has specific requirements, and every service is slightly different. However, if you have chosen AWS, and you are setting up a LAMP, and have no plans for rapid growth, then RDS is a must. If you have not chosen a provider, look over all of them, since if you go RDS, you have to go AWS for everything.
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About Amazon RDS

Amazon Relational Database Service (Amazon RDS) is a database-as-a-service (DBaaS) from Amazon Web Services.

Amazon RDS Technical Details

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