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Amazon Route 53

Amazon Route 53

Overview

What is Amazon Route 53?

Amazon Route 53 is a Cloud Domain Name System (DNS) offered by Amazon AWS as a reliable way to route visitors to web applications and other site traffic to locations within a company's infrastructure, which can be configured to monitor…

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Recent Reviews

Route 53

9 out of 10
January 25, 2023
Incentivized
Ease of use and management of the amazon route 53 that is our main benefit. Our current solution was not cloud based and it would affect …
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Amazon Route 53

10 out of 10
January 13, 2023
Incentivized
Highly Available, scriptable DNS zone management. We had issues with DOS on smaller providers (Ultra, Dyn) and Amazon Route 53 was able to …
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Awards

Products that are considered exceptional by their customers based on a variety of criteria win TrustRadius awards. Learn more about the types of TrustRadius awards to make the best purchase decision. More about TrustRadius Awards

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Pricing

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Standard

$0.40

Cloud
Per Zone Per Month

Queries

$0.60

Cloud
Per Million Queries

Entry-level set up fee?

  • No setup fee

Offerings

  • Free Trial
  • Free/Freemium Version
  • Premium Consulting/Integration Services
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Product Details

What is Amazon Route 53?

Amazon Route 53 Technical Details

Deployment TypesSoftware as a Service (SaaS), Cloud, or Web-Based
Operating SystemsUnspecified
Mobile ApplicationNo

Frequently Asked Questions

Amazon Route 53 is a Cloud Domain Name System (DNS) offered by Amazon AWS as a reliable way to route visitors to web applications and other site traffic to locations within a company's infrastructure, which can be configured to monitor the health and performance of traffic and endpoints in the network.

Reviewers rate Usability highest, with a score of 9.

The most common users of Amazon Route 53 are from Mid-sized Companies (51-1,000 employees).
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Comparisons

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Reviews and Ratings

(64)

Attribute Ratings

Reviews

(1-25 of 25)
Companies can't remove reviews or game the system. Here's why
Rajat Seth | TrustRadius Reviewer
Score 9 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Incentivized
Amazon Route 53 has a simple UI with everything you need right in front of you. When you add a new record, the response time is super fast. Support for elastic DNS is also fantastic, as setting anything like that up manually requires knowledge, whereas Route53 provides it ready-made availability.
  • Super fast DNS server.
  • Quick setup.
  • Large API Library.
  • Needed bit easy documentation.
  • GUI could be better with more themes.
Route53 is fully accountable for our product DNS hosting and monitoring. It has boosted uptime and made administration easier. It's also simple to automate and monitor, making it easier to manage operational difficulties and development.
Manan Soni | TrustRadius Reviewer
Score 9 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Incentivized
Amazon Route 53 is an excellent tool for DNS routing that is simple to set up. Setting up your domain with DNS servers and DNS routing in minutes takes virtually no time. Route 53 is ideal for all sizes of businesses, all types of industries, and all regions of countries.
  • DNS Customization
  • Easy to Integrate
  • Low Cost Service provider
  • interface is a bit basic
  • Cheap for first year but costly for renewals
We decrease the time spent on operational tasks and utilize it to focus on development tasks, which cannot be archived without the assistance of a service provider such as Amazon Route 53. It's so inexpensive and affordable that anyone can get started with it, yet it's a highly dependable tool.
Score 10 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Incentivized
Our backend services run in AWS, and we need public domain to expose the services. The services are running in different geo locations as we have end users globally. But we would like to provide one single domain to end users. With the routing features from Amazon Route 53, we are able to route the requests to nearest location from the user, which reduces latency and improves user experience.
  • Routing policy support
  • Seamless integration with other AWS services
  • Support for Infrastructure as Code
  • Probably better monitoring of user traffic
Amazon Route 53 is well suited if: 1. you always use other AWS services, and need good integration for some DNS service 2. you need support for simple traffic routing, e.g. based on latency or geolocation 3. you need support for complex traffic routing 4. you want to manage DNS via code
January 25, 2023

Route 53

Score 9 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Incentivized
Ease of use and management of the amazon route 53 that is our main benefit. Our current solution was not cloud based and it would affect us geographically. But Route 53 being a cloud service has greatly helped us in that space. We use it for managing the external DNS services within our organization.
  • It help us increase dependability by rerouting our DNS to an alternate destination if the original application endpoint becomes unavailable.
  • Amazon Route 53 on Amazon Traffic Flow directs the traffic depending on a variety of factors, including endpoint health, geographic location, and latency which we set up various traffic regulations and choose which ones to use at any given moment.
  • We can build and change traffic policies via the Route 53 interface, AWS SDKs, or the Route 53 API using the easy visual editor So, the versioning function in Traffic Flow keeps track of changes to traffic policies, allowing us to quickly roll back to a prior version through the interface or API and thus it provides flexibility.
  • more customization or interface options
  • Model registry may be not clear sometimes.
- Routing users to the closest or best-performing resources: Route 53 allows you to use geolocation and latency-based routing to route users to the resources that will give them the best performance.
- Load balancing: Route 53 can be used to distribute incoming traffic across multiple resources, such as Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2) instances or Amazon Elastic Container Service (ECS) tasks, to improve the availability and scalability of your application.
- Managing domain names: Route 53 can be used to register domain names and manage DNS records, making it a one-stop solution for managing your domain name and routing traffic to your resources.

Scenarios where Route 53 is less appropriate include:Applications with very high query rates: Route 53 is designed to handle millions of queries per second, but if your application generates an extremely high query rate, you may need to use a specialized DNS service.Applications that require very low latency: Route 53 is designed to provide low-latency DNS service, but if your application requires ultra-low latency, you may need to use a specialized DNS service or a self-hosted DNS solution.Applications that require advanced security features: Route 53 provides basic security features such as DNSSEC, but if your application requires advanced security features such as DDoS protection, you may need to use a specialized DNS service.
Score 8 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Incentivized
We have been using Amazon Route 53 in order to redirect our end users to our applications, using their capability of translating human language to our IP addresses. Before using Route 53, we were facing a lot of issues regarding routes and DNS which now is much easier to set up and follow up.
  • Easy setup
  • Running on AWS environment
  • Charts
  • Follow-ups
If you want to get rid of route issues and you are hosting your applications on AWS Cloud, Amazon Route 53 is definitely a good choice once it is very easy to set up and you don't need to worry anymore regarding the routes and DNS settings once this tool handles all these things for you.
Score 8 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Incentivized
We use Amazon Route 53 to provide public DNS services for several domains for our public websites, remote access with health checks, and for other common services. We needed a global and reliable provider that had a lot of functionality and could work well with our public website, which is also hosted on AWS.
  • Reliable
  • Cost effective
  • Integrates with other AWS services
  • Flexibility
  • Usability
Great for customers who have a decent understanding of how DNS works and need a global & reliable service. Also helpful for customers looking for an integrated solution that can pair well with other AWS services, such as EC2 for website hosting. Not as good for customers that want an extremely simple, plug and play solution (don't get me wrong though, Route53 isn't SO difficult).
January 13, 2023

Amazon Route 53

Score 10 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Incentivized
Highly Available, scriptable DNS zone management. We had issues with DOS on smaller providers (Ultra, Dyn) and Amazon Route 53 was able to handle DDOS against our zones better.
  • API access to manage Amazon Route 53
  • Redundancy and High Availablility
  • Nice extensions (geographic resolution, aliasing)
  • As long as all Amazon Route 53 can be controlled when us-east-1 is down, I'm happy.
  • Replication lags but don't they all?
  • Diagnostics on DNS TXT validation fields like "issuewild" is suddnly necessary but was never really documented as a "change" to their requirements.
Very redundant, very fast, very easy to use the API, and very cheap.
Piyush Goel | TrustRadius Reviewer
Score 9 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Incentivized
We use AWS Route 53 as the DNS management solution for ~12 years. We have over 800+ domain entries being managed over there. These include the tools as below:
  1. API Endpoints that process over 100M API calls a day.
  2. Web-Portal for configuration management used by 20K business users.
  3. Web-hooks exposed to the external world for sending DLR notifications for the marketing messages that we send out (>100M messages per day).
  • Uptime - Route53 is highly performant and available. We have had only 3-4 instances in the last 12 years when we had any downtime or outages due to Route53.
  • Extensive API layer on Route53 that allows integration with external tools and SDK's (Boto, Terraform, etc)
  • Closely integrated with the other AWS services. Makes it easy to operate the infra.
  • Importing external Zone files is tricky. Takes a bit of time to figure.
  • UI is a little slow to load when the number of entries are high (>100)
  • Can give tag based search feature to make it easier to look for the relevant entries.
  • Some common features like Logging, Health Checks can be expensive.
Services needed high availability - It's always available (nearly). Haven't had too many major outages in the last 12 years. Working with Infrastructure as a Code platforms - Great API support that makes is easier to work with external infra management tools. Auto-Failover, and Advanced Routing - Good support for failovers and routing policies that can be mixed and matched. Different Network topologies - You can create internal VPC's and external look-ups seamlessly using the same set of tools.
January 11, 2023

Working as expected

Score 7 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Incentivized
I am using amazon rote 53 as a delegated Nameserver from my primary DNS server. This is acting as a backup DNS incase if the primary goes down
  • high availability
  • easy to generate the hit count report
  • uptime
  • it took time initially to setup the synchronization from my primary DNS to route 53
  • cost is based on the usage/hit count
when we had a issue with the primary DNS provider due to DDOS attack, the route 53 served all the DNS request and thus having a minimum impact to our business. There is no specific reason for choosing aws DNS but since we had this for almost 7 - 8 years , we never though of changing it to something else as we never encountered any issue with route 53
Rekha Yadav | TrustRadius Reviewer
Score 10 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Incentivized
Amazon Web Service (AWS) Route 53 offers seamless Domain Name Services Offering , Route53 was used to register company domains in the cloud so that cloud based workloads such as EC2 instance and Applications can be integrated and joined with customer domains. For certain applications route 53 DNS was used to control the traffic across different regions.
  • Allow application traffic between different regions
  • extending domain name services from on-prem to cloud
  • DNS firewall to allow/reject traffic
  • Cross account DNS service is not available
  • DNS resolution between VNET
  • Limited visibility from observability point of view
AWS route 53 is a highly available and reliable domain name service which works far better than on-premises based DNS service (i.e. better than Microsoft DNS) due to multiple reasons - 1. High Available 2. Reliable. 4. Secure. 5. SaaS offering 6. No Code/Low Code 7. Secure Service 8. Automation possibility
Score 10 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Incentivized
Amazon Route 53 is great place to manage your all domains and sub domains. You can easily add and manage your all domains. Also making changes are so easy and whatever you change or add records same like TXT, DNS, MX and more, it affects so quickly and you do not have to wait so long time.
  • Easy to use
  • Working so stable
  • Effective in short time
  • Nothing
We are using Amazon Route 53 as our domain controller to manage our domains and sub domains. Route 53 always give us ability to manage easily our all domain environment. We are adding and removing DNS, TXT, MX and many more records.
January 09, 2023

How good is Route 53?

Score 8 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Incentivized
We use Route53 as the main domain provider in our company. Although we don't purchase the domain in there for legal reasons, we do delegate all of them to Route53 to manage them directly within the AWS console, or through the API or even through Terraform. We currently have hundreds of hosted zones, and ten of thousands of records in there.
  • Integration with other AWS services
  • Fine grainded access control using IAM policies
  • Geo-routing is particularly useful when traffic is global
  • It's quite raw, and does not protect you from making mistakes
  • It can be tricky to centralize DNS management when you have multiple AWS accounts
It's a quite decent DNS management service in its own right. The ALIAS feature that allows to point an APEX domain to another CNAME (and not necessarily to an IP address, like in standard DNS) is definitely a plus.
It's quite a technical service, so it might not be very welcoming or user friendly if a good UX/UI is what you're looking for.
Score 6 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Incentivized
We use this Amazon software to manage incoming customer messages/ requests on Amazon orders for our product. It enables us to connect with these third-party customers (we usually wouldn't be able to, since it's a separate shipping system from our DTC business). I mainly use it to access Amazon orders and speak with customers.
  • Access to order history
  • Ease of response
  • Ease of resolving issues
  • UX design is outdated
  • Customer lookup is often difficult
  • Slow to load
In general, Amazon Route 53 is a pretty good fit for companies that want a highly available and scalable DNS solution that integrates seamlessly with other AWS services. It may not be as suitable for organizations that require advanced DNS features or have specific compliance requirements that are not met by the service.
Score 7 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Incentivized
We use Amazon Route 53 to host a few websites and their content. It is a good option for people who seek to start a website quickly and attach a domain name to it and host HTML5 and static content. You don't need to look for a server. If you are already using Amazon - it is a very good option.
  • Host a website.
  • Quickly build a website.
  • Build a website that hosts static content and HTML5 content.
  • Good option if you're already using Amazon services.
  • The user interface on Amazon is not very convenient.
  • The handling of www redirect is not optimal.
  • Lack of HTTPS support. I'm positive it is impossible to implement.
  • No website logging support.
Amazon Route 53 is well suited if:
1. You seek to create a simple website fast.
2. The site would be able to host HTML5 content and static content attach a domain name.
3. Have simple and accessible management.

Scenarios where Amazon Route 53 is less appropriate:
1. If a website needs HTTPS.
2. If you need to have extensive logging and tracing on the website.
3. If a website is designed to host dynamic content.

Bob Smith | TrustRadius Reviewer
Score 8 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Incentivized
Route 53 is used as our primary Domain Name Service (DNS) which exposes our products to our users online. Unlike other DNS providers, Route 53 is specialized to work within Amazon Web Services (AWS) to make exposing endpoints across services as seamless as possible. Route 53 also helps quickly switch routing for our red/green deployments making sure our customers have a great experience when using our services during updates.
  • Domain Name Services
  • High Availability
  • Working with AWS Services
  • Each DNS provider has its own look/feel, Route 53 does take some time to fully understand
  • Understanding which services can be referenced from Route53 in different scenarios (best practices)
  • Ability to import Zone files from other sources more easily
If you provide services on the internet and those services are hosted in Amazon Web Services then Route 53 is the right solution for you. If you host services on multiple providers it may be more difficult to manage your DNS solely through Route 53, but it is still possible. Route 53 is a great DNS provider all around!
November 29, 2021

Powerful DNS Management

Score 8 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Incentivized
Route 53 is quite powerful and more flexible than the managed DNS our registrar provides. It allows us to easily smooth over the many domain transfers we have to do as part of web hosting by allowing easy, longer term off-site DNS servers. We also use it with our own web servers, and Route 53 provides a lot of great features for load balancing.
  • Host DNS for domains outside our registrar.
  • Integrate with other AWS services.
  • Constantly improve on basic quality of life for people like me who manage DNS.
  • The advanced controls for editing a zone file can get a little verbose, especially when you just want to do something simple like set up a new TXT record.
  • They need to make it easier to do common tasks like setting up a DKIM record, especially given their length.
  • Some of the drop down boxes need to be set with better defaults when setting up a new zone file to make it quicker.
If you need to constantly take control of domains and transfer them into your registrar, using Route 53 will help, especially if you're already using other parts of AWS. If you need advanced controls for a lot of dynamic records, Route 53 has you covered. If you just want to have a simple website with maybe some email, you don't need it!
Gnanasekar Mani | TrustRadius Reviewer
Score 8 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Incentivized
I have worked with AWS Route 53 in all the three of my Organizations in which I worked. Route 53 plays major role when it comes to create and serve the Website all over the world for DNS when created through Amazon web services also when you are website is hosted in less popular cloud providers. One best thing is we can use Route 53 service alone from AWS even though our website is hosted in any other Cloud Service Provider. And, as usual route 53 offers all types of Routing type which you can expect of also the cost is competitive for the scale it provides.
The main reason for backing up this service as per my advice it would be it interacts with anything service provider and setting up is kinda of easy also there isn't negligible downtime.
  • We can purchase our domain through Route 53 and can be hosted for cheaper prices in AWS.
  • There are many number of routing policies you can go ahead with and this will come into picture when the customer satisfaction is required at most, so choose routing policy accordingly.
  • As usual health checks are part of DNS systems, this is also provided at cheaper rates when total process is done in Route 53 service.
  • It can be used as standalone application from AWS
  • During initial setup when you are using Route 53 or DNS systems for very first time, there are little number of documentation from AWS which is kinda of little tough. But, once you get hold of it, its a cake walk for everyone.
  • Health checks are kinda of little costly when Compared to other big players, but that doesn't affect much when you compare its uses.
  • The logging is well structured though its costly
When you want the setup of DNS and domain registration to be done in couple of hours this will be the first place to go also the main reason for supporting the Route 53 service will be its integration with other AWS services should has CloudFront and SES services. With Route 53 and CloudFront combined you can have two layer of protection to your systems which will be one big thing when you see in terms of Cyber attacks.
Score 9 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Incentivized
Route 53 means the automation of a lot of stuff we did manually before. It's used by our Infrastructure team and some other small teams when in development. The business problems that it solves were related to speed in new deployments of entries, change entries, set up new domains, and being faster than before.
  • Web interface
  • The many options to set up new entries
  • Fast, really fast
  • No more editing files
  • Add not only domain zones but domain names
  • The new interface--the old one was better.
  • The import process is very good but it could connect to the current DNS server if available and import too.
Amazon Route 53 is very good if your team is big or small. For a single person to manage it, if you know what are you doing, you'll notice that it is faster than BIND to manage, for example, no need to add a serial number, and edit entries are also very fast. The only scenario where I think it's less appropriate is when you don't want to spend money dealing with DNS. But, even in that, the price of a single machine is not cheaper than to set up an AWS account and a new DNS zone.
Score 10 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Incentivized
We use Route53 as much as we can to manage DNS. Even in cases where we have other DNS providers, like CloudFlare, we still often connect with or touch on Route53 in our application flows.

In particular, our serverless applications and AWS-based microservices are all wired up such that they, in some way, are touched by Route 53.
  • It's a top-notch DNS provider. Easy to use, basically free, and always online.
  • Probably one of the easiest AWS services to use and configure.
  • Particularly good at connecting DNS information with the rest of the AWS ecosystem, especially CloudFront.
  • It could provide more push-button abilities for caching and cache control, much in the way that CloudFlare does.
  • It could integrate more strongly with DNS marketplaces for purchasing and sale of domains.
If you need to manage DNS (as opposed to using some other service that wires it up for you), it's the best service to reach for. Nobody else is cheaper or more stable, it's completely fully featured, and it's accessible via APIs if you need that. The only reason I'd avoid Route53 is if I already have a DNS provider that I've consolidated my domains in, or if my organization is unable to use AWS.
Score 9 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Incentivized
Amazon Route 53 is being used at our company as the default DNS service. This service is used both by the technical department for production and by the marketing team for the website.
  • DNS server - it just works. good availability and fast propagation.
  • Simple to use.
  • Designed to work with other AWS services.
  • If you already use AWS, you have both your server/services and DNS in one place.
  • Price, it is not expensive ... but you can find some cheaper and even free DNS solutions.
  • If you use non-AWS infrastructure, Route 53 doesn't have significant advantages on other services.
  • AWS Route 53 does not support forwarding or conditional forwarding options for domains used on an on-premise network.
AWS Route 53 is well suited for standard use (if you already use AWS) and for use with AWS services. Its Geo DNS (routing users to an endpoint, depending on detected user geography) works fine as well - can be used if you have users worldwide.

However, AWS Route 53 does not support forwarding or conditional forwarding options for domains used on an on-premise network.
Score 9 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Incentivized
As part of our Cloud migration to AWS we have started using Route 53. Being able to programmaticaly build all aspects of the deployment in general and for route 53 in particular is a life saver. Being part of the same ecosystem make deploying so much easier... As we move all on-prem to AWS, and DNS is essential, Route 53 we need to rely on R53 and it delivers.
  • Plain DNS.
  • Easy to programmatically administer.
  • There are a few limitations which we encountered but hope will be resolved soon.
  • Not R53 speficic, but naming conventions are essential.
Being in the AWS ecosystem, using Route 53 is more or less a given. There are other options out there but none are as integrated into the ecosystem as Route 53. Especially for your internal name resolving there realistically is no other viable alternative. For external name resolving there are other options out there with more options, but do you really need them.
Score 10 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Incentivized
We're using Route53 to manage all of our internal DNS entries within our company. It has allowed us to map URLs to many different IP addresses and is easier to keep track of what address points go to which server.
  • New DNS entries work almost instantly and they're very easy to setup. It's very user-friendly.
  • None that we've seen. It just works well.
Route53 is great with setting DNS entries, no matter what type they are.
Kevin Van Heusen | TrustRadius Reviewer
Score 10 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Incentivized
Route 53 provides a nice centralized location for managing our domains. It makes it easy to assign DNS records to various AWS instances, elastic load balancers or aliases to other servers not located inside AWS infrastructure. Route 53 has had great availability and ensured our DNS setup is relatively painless and not needing concern.
  • Easy setup of various DNS records, TXT, SPF, and any other type needed.
  • Facilitates creating aliases between DNS records and AWS resources (Elastic load balancer, AWS instance, etc).
  • Bulletproof and highly available, rare to run into issues with DNS lookup.
  • Would be nice if Amazon provided some troubleshooting capabilities or for a given domain run through some checks (MX record setup, etc).
  • Some of the UI could be improved when setting values for things like TXT records which aren't well described in the Route 53 interface.
  • Would be helpful to have an alternate view of Hosted zones and the records within. Sorting by recordset type helps but with many records for a given zone you can get lost.
Route 53 is the best DNS solution for those hosted in Amazon Web Services (you can easily set aliases to AWS resources): S3 Buckets, Elastic Load Balancers, etc. Any organization with multiple domains or a single domain hosted in AWS is a good fit. If you aren't hosted in AWS, it may offer fewer advantages and you may want to go with your hosting provider depending on who they are.
Dylan Cauwels | TrustRadius Reviewer
Score 8 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Incentivized
Route53 is an easily accessible and simple DNS service that's integrated with AWS. We use Route53 for any web applications that we deploy and I have used Route53 for all of my personal projects that need DNS routing. While it does lack some control when routing traffic to resources outside of AWS, it solves any tangible need for AWS-hosted applications.
  • Route53's UI is quite simple and can be understood and manipulated within minutes of introduction.
  • Route53 is globally scalable and customizable, allowing you to set intuitive fail overs and routing based on latency, location, random, or set policies.
  • With AWS-hosted infrastructure, Route53 allows for a special set of alias records with extended privileges to simplify your DNS solution.
  • With non-AWS infrastructure, you're limited to simple DNS records and a restricted set of features compare to AWS deployments.
  • Route53 does cost more than competitors such as Namecheap or GoDaddy, making it a poor choice if used with infrastructure not hosted on AWS.
Great when used with AWS infrastructure. It gives you additional features and permissions that you do not get when you use Route53 with outside applications. This is the end-all be-all for using Route53, as all of its pros are lost when you migrate your resources outside of AWS and have to use its handicapped capabilities.
Score 9 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Incentivized
DNS is a core piece of any internet backbone. Route 53 provides distributed and resilient DNS services with little effort. Moving to Route 53 is as simple as either updating your domain's name server records, or to move the domain to AWS. Route 53 provides a simple and inexpensive mechanism for managing and serving DNS traffic.
  • Distributed servers around the world. AWS handles this automatically, distributing DNS records to geographically diverse locations.
  • Simple, intuitive interface. Route 53 provides a web-based portal for viewing and modifying DNS records.
  • API services. Route 53 provides a robust API for accessing and manipulating DNS entries.
  • Integration with other AWS services. If you're using other AWS services, Route 53 integrates directly, allowing for aliases and load balancing.
  • Bulk entry of DNS records via the web interface can be difficult. Records are required to be in BIND format and can only be imported into an empty zone. Once records exist, you can no longer import in bulk via the web interface.
DNS is almost always necessary, and Route 53 does this well. Even when not using other AWS services, Route 53 provides a reliable service worth investing in. The cost to run a Route 53 instance is minimal and the reduced overhead of not having to directly manage your DNS servers is worth the investment.
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