TrustRadius
https://dudodiprj2sv7.cloudfront.net/product-logos/De/x0/ADJ9GPOTE0ZT.PNGA review from a "not-so-technical" perspectiveWhile I am sure there are other orgs/teams within the company that use Bluemix, I am unfamiliar with anybody else's usage outside that of my groups. We use Bluemix for several things, but our main use thus far has been for the Conversation Service. We use this service for the dialog design of our Virtual Agent. Additionally, we are using WKS (which I hear is now no longer a part of bluemix?) for a content annotation project with the end-goal of creating somewhat of a semantic network for our content library. The broader goal here is to improve our content's findability and relevance, so after WKS we will begin piloting WDS as a content retrieval service. That being said, our primary use-case is by far the Conversation Service for dialog design.,Intuitive user interface makes it easy for anyone to use, regardless of their professional background. A lot of the services integrate well with external platforms, APIs, and programs, not just IBM services. A lot of the competitors in this space lack this ability. Maybe it is just our contract in particular, but support and help is always made available.,Need: VISUALIZATION CAPABILITIES! Particularly with the Conversation Service. Need: Annotation capabilities for dialog nodes in Conversation Service. Need: Search/querying capabilities in Conversation Service Need: Clearer documentation of the S2T service. I had to use a third party website for an understanding of how to use this.,9,Our Virtual Agent (designed with Watson Conversation Service) handles more than 1,000 conversations per day. Since February 2017, our Virtual Agent (designed with Watson Conversation Service) has saved 222,363 minutes, or roughly 463 days, of customer support agent's time working on less complex Tier 1 issues, freeing up agent capacity to assist customers with more complex inquiries. A lot of our work is still a WIP so it is hard to answer this.,Wasn't a huge consideration for me particularly, but I know my manager considered this. That being said, it makes me feel better about my work knowing we are operating on an open-source platform that helps move toward a world wherein almost anyone can deploy through the cloud and contribute to a universal project.,10,This is not really my area of expertise. I personally did not use Docker for any of our deployments, nor do I know if our Application Develops.. I wish I had more feedback for you here, but I don't. I know we just added a Linux instance, so I would guess Docker software was used for this?,Once again, I really wish I had some feedback for you here, but I don't. I don't even know if our application developers use it, but I see potential value in cost savings by using this, or a service like this, to avoid paying for the other resources/services/API calls we don't make/use during a session.,Benefits to Small Startups from BluemixIt's used across the whole organisation, Bluemix is providing the foundation for our enterprise apps, which we develop as mobile-first developers. The availability of push notifications, the functionality and integrity of the mobile system, as well as the overall security are the keys to its value to us.,Flexible development environments available, all interoperative, from Docker-based to apiconnect-based. We can use several repo-sites and keep code versions well tracked and reclaimable on any of them. The networked nature of the systems means we can develop from a world wide basis of engineers and programmers, although right now we have one Senior Software Engineer and a couple of coders, in different countries. Datasources can be connected from anywhere. Mobile Endpoint Security, and Server Security (meeting or exceeding 27001 and 27002) with IBM, represent resellable value to us. We are a fledgling company, but as soon as we are able to afford to use the Blockchains offered by IBM, we will do so, because we can eliminate one entire class of financial (or any trust/transaction-based) risk this way. With the use of Cordova we can code our front ends once and cover the web, Android and iOS platforms together with minimal fuss to tailor the code.,Sometimes the API Connect GUIs don't cleanly disengage after attaching models or updating schema and it is hard to know what has been written successfully and which (if any) models or tables were missed. I shouldn't have to manually check through a list of 377 models to find the ones in and out of a list on either models, folder or database tables. Printing a summary even in logs which did a "diff" sort of thing between 'task-set' and 'task-completed' (referring to attaching models or updating schema as tasks here as 'tasks'). Provide access to Postgres Database in Sydney datacentre for Australia. Clearer documentation around setting up a secure (referring to SSL and certificate setup here) server on eg, chubby1.au-sydney.mybluemix.net. Allow a ramp in pricing onto the Blockchains. We will not be able to afford it until quite a few years into production, even if we launch successfully.,10,IBM Bluemix is mainly a foundation enabler at this stage, although our business plan does look promising. The low cost of development on Bluemix for a start-up like us is so helpful......we had no spare cash for this project besides what we could save or borrow at first, and that wasn't much. We are still trying to attract venture capital to cover the main Cordova Coding effort plus the launch "Cash Burn". Features like push notifications, mobile-back end, and world-beating security help us to sell our SaaS products/services. The pure (usually!) functionality of IBM products and services is very rewarding to work with.They are so insightful and thoughtful, to say naught of clever!,We had been using Red Hat systems but found they could not financially do business with us in Australia. We came to IBM with an open mind, as I had my first experiences with networked IBM computing as a trainee mech engineer using FORTRAN on a remote TTY terminal in North Sydney from James Howden's offices. Those times opened my eyes a lot and impressed me even then, in 1976. Compare that to using CloudFoundry from way down the South Coast of NSW and experiencing the speed with which I could build a basic app server which worked and be able to edit code, and together with our casual software engineer, I was able to learn how CloudFoundry apps worked (including all about Docker). The degree of automation is amazing with the CloudFoundry systems, but I have to admit we stumbled onto all this partly because Red Hat failed us in a business sense, and my memories of my prior contacts with IBM have all been impressive, so when we started searching for an alternative PaaS provider, they seemed [to be the] most reliable, safest and best of the prospects.,1,By installing Docker locally, we were able to code/test/run etc., our apps locally, building, running and linking pairs of small containers housing an app server and a database server. Alterations can be made to the models or the database tables, code can be edited, all locally. You can then "push" all the code from the app's root directory, to Bluemix in the Cloud (we have used the US South region as well as the Sydney, Australia region) with "cf push <app_name>", or "commit" and "push" to your upstream repo, and build & run it from there. The cloud version, including API endpoints for each model should then be available on the Bluemix site from the browser, as long as you have configured your web certificates properly for the SSL system (https://). Of course you need to have connected a database service, with schema, and a full set of models for the app server to connect to. Adding database functions on the database server to post between 2 layers of the database (the Use Case layer receiving incoming Form-Data, and the Raw Business-Data Layer) and routing code in the node.js app server completes the backend.,Red Hat and HerokuGood choice, some more features to equalize with others welcomeWe were using container services from Bluemix - CloudFoundry PaaS to manage our applications. Apps were Java wars wrapped in Docker containers. Also Softlayer VPS's were used to provide for our Cassandra cluster, where we installed and managed Cassandra instances manually. Four VPS nodes total were in use.,PaaS Watson (did not use in prd, just saw good demos) Bare metal servers,At the time we used there was no direct Docker offering (had to use containers via CloudFoundry api, which is another layer to learn) No hosted Cassandra database offering (or similar DB, like Amazon Dynamo) I was unable to use VPN link with another provider: Both sides had incompatible configurations and it was impossible to instantiate working VPN connection. Support was only able to point that the other party uses settings that are incompatible with IBM.,8,Expedited app deployment Deployment of software on VPS was a pain Faulty VPN consumed lot of time and was not successful in the end,CF was not a major positive or negative factor in choosing Bluemix. I consider Docker as the de-facto standard for containers. I perceive CloudFoundry as an API that abstracts the provider somehow, however in practice it's largely just another thing to learn. I think it's a good step that Bluemix now has direct support for Docker/Kubernetes which are now used everywhere.,,We used Docker images over the CloudFoundry API. It seemed slightly superficially stitched together as we were not able to get some features to work for us (e.g. mapping ports with standard command options). We had however several apps deployed as PaaS with use of CloudFoundry, however using Docker directly would be nicer from the user's perspective.,While it looks convenient to start development, I have not heard of any complex case studies for such a Lambda approach. To prove its effectiveness in real life scenarios as it abstracts the control over the execution to the platform. Also this model lacks strong development environment support, and requires different process/setup from a configuration management point of view.,docker, amazon, azure, heroku and dcosIBM Bluemix - A Paragidm Shift in Cloud ComputingWe use Bluemix internally and for our clients across entire organizations. Bluemix enhances the connectivity between different cloud services, so that data and code can be aggregated in one central place: The Bluemix Dashboard. While similar services exist in AWS and Azure, Bluemix makes the integration highly automated and reliable. Coders can self service their section of the Bluemix infrastructure without relying on cloud networking experts to do so. Database administrators can easily share and control access to data through IBM Data Connect across more than 20 industry standard databases, and though multi-cloud vendors.,Sends data from IBM Data Connect to Data Analytics in one click. Manages coding in the cloud IDE with continuous integration. Has tool chains which aggregate different services together into a complete process. Has a dashboard that is far more in-depth and intuitive than AWS or Azure.,Basics like DNS and routing can be challenging. Uptime is not at the same level as AWS. Phone support is not at the level of AWS.,10,Very cost effective and horizontally scalable serivces. More predictable than spinning up new virtual servers for expansion (Charged by API). Adaptation of all standards including Docker, MongoDB, Node-RED, allows leveraging of existing and Open Source code more reliably to reduce costs.,The underpinning of Cloud Foundry as the structure for Bluemix enabled IBM to stay compatible with other services. That was important to us. IBM to our knowledge is the biggest open source backer in the world based on the number of coders they have assigned to open source. They continue to innovate and embrace new technologies like Kubernetes.,10,We have entire third party platforms running in Docker within client Bluemix instances. Through connected Bluemix services, those Docker instances are much more integrated than they would be with the same Docker container in AWS or Azure. We are now testing Open Whisk which further reaches into Docker containers for event triggered coding in both directions... to and from Docker.,In testing phase now. Its highly integrated into our "API First" mentality, with another layer added by Open Whisk. Its reducing our need for SQL triggers and other code which would be buried in dense legacy systems. Open Whisk is allowing these triggers to be centralized and visible by all our coding staff for better integration and coding efficiency.,AWS, Azure and RackspaceBluemix, promising for a small startup but a let down after further research.We were part of the IBM Global Entrepreneur program and were given the opportunity to use Bluemix or SoftLayer. We made an attempt to use Bluemix for a few small applications when were were dabbling with rebuilding the platform Meteor. If it worked out it would have been the main platform for the production distribution of the web application.,Bluemix makes it really easy to deploy new applications; they give you a good starting point and try to walk you through the process until its time to write or deploy your code. They also offer basically everything you could need for your infrastructure in one spot, which is super valuable. This was an attractive option for us. They support all of the most popular languages and frameworks, JS, Ruby, etc... and have a lot of boilerplate apps to get you started. It significantly reduces the amount of DevOps work.,When we used it, it was super buggy which didn't instill very much confidence in the platform. It seems kind of 'black boxy' like we didn't feel like we had much control over the system, so we were always kind of skeptical of the magic going on behind the scenes and how secure it was. There is not very much interfacing outside of the IBM ecosystem. We we felt pressured to use their version control management and the task management tools Bluemix provided when we were experimenting with it.,8,Well we didn't end up using it so, in that respect, I would say a negative business impact since we spent time messing with it. It did show us some technologies to look for in the future though, so that was positive. However, with Bluemix we were able to experiment with new technology which is always good for the engineers in terms of learning new things.,CloudFoundry was a big deal for us; rapid deployment is usually difficult in small teams so a tool allowing us to do that would be super beneficial. Unfortunately, we were having trouble getting Bluemix/CloudFoundry to spin up without a Rails-based web application. This was definitely a selling point for Bluemix, but we were let down. It was not as seamless as IBM made it appear.,10,We didn't use containerization in out application.,We didn't use open OpenWhisk either but we've always been told to stay away from technology like AWS Lambda and OpenWhisk since you are basically giving all of your app performance control up to the hosting provider. For that reason I would stay away from this as well, unless someone could could explain to me why my concern isn't an issue. It could be good for rapid prototyping though.,digital ocean and softlayer
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IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS)
61 Ratings
Score 7.5 out of 101
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IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS) Reviews

IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS)
61 Ratings
Score 7.5 out of 101
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September 15, 2017

IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS): "A review from a "not-so-technical" perspective"

Score 9 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
While I am sure there are other orgs/teams within the company that use Bluemix, I am unfamiliar with anybody else's usage outside that of my groups. We use Bluemix for several things, but our main use thus far has been for the Conversation Service. We use this service for the dialog design of our Virtual Agent. Additionally, we are using WKS (which I hear is now no longer a part of bluemix?) for a content annotation project with the end-goal of creating somewhat of a semantic network for our content library. The broader goal here is to improve our content's findability and relevance, so after WKS we will begin piloting WDS as a content retrieval service. That being said, our primary use-case is by far the Conversation Service for dialog design.
  • Intuitive user interface makes it easy for anyone to use, regardless of their professional background.
  • A lot of the services integrate well with external platforms, APIs, and programs, not just IBM services. A lot of the competitors in this space lack this ability.
  • Maybe it is just our contract in particular, but support and help is always made available.
  • Need: VISUALIZATION CAPABILITIES! Particularly with the Conversation Service.
  • Need: Annotation capabilities for dialog nodes in Conversation Service.
  • Need: Search/querying capabilities in Conversation Service
  • Need: Clearer documentation of the S2T service. I had to use a third party website for an understanding of how to use this.
Well Suited:
- Development of information architecture/library. It enables better classification/taxonomy, leading to more intuitive findability.
- Dialog design and content retrieval for virtual agents. (e.g. a virtual agent whose content offerings are not hard-coded into the response fields, but instead require crawling/drawing from other pages/libraries)
Not Well Suited:
- Annotation/labeling/clustering of information that will be retrieved using a different search/query service.
We aimed to create a cognitive and emotionally engaging virtual agent using IBM Bluemix Services. To do so, a level humanization is needed. Communication is a two-way street, and thus cognition is necessitated from both a recognition and response perspective. In other words we needed a set of services that would enable us to create a virtual agent who could understand natural language, cognitively compute the signals, and thus respond appropriately. We aimed to replace specific human tasks, so we needed to replicate the type and levels of human cognition needed for these tasks.
Read River Hain's full review
July 12, 2017

IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS) Review: "Benefits to Small Startups from Bluemix"

Score 10 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
It's used across the whole organisation, Bluemix is providing the foundation for our enterprise apps, which we develop as mobile-first developers. The availability of push notifications, the functionality and integrity of the mobile system, as well as the overall security are the keys to its value to us.
  • Flexible development environments available, all interoperative, from Docker-based to apiconnect-based. We can use several repo-sites and keep code versions well tracked and reclaimable on any of them. The networked nature of the systems means we can develop from a world wide basis of engineers and programmers, although right now we have one Senior Software Engineer and a couple of coders, in different countries.
  • Datasources can be connected from anywhere.
  • Mobile Endpoint Security, and Server Security (meeting or exceeding 27001 and 27002) with IBM, represent resellable value to us.
  • We are a fledgling company, but as soon as we are able to afford to use the Blockchains offered by IBM, we will do so, because we can eliminate one entire class of financial (or any trust/transaction-based) risk this way.
  • With the use of Cordova we can code our front ends once and cover the web, Android and iOS platforms together with minimal fuss to tailor the code.
  • Sometimes the API Connect GUIs don't cleanly disengage after attaching models or updating schema and it is hard to know what has been written successfully and which (if any) models or tables were missed. I shouldn't have to manually check through a list of 377 models to find the ones in and out of a list on either models, folder or database tables. Printing a summary even in logs which did a "diff" sort of thing between 'task-set' and 'task-completed' (referring to attaching models or updating schema as tasks here as 'tasks').
  • Provide access to Postgres Database in Sydney datacentre for Australia.
  • Clearer documentation around setting up a secure (referring to SSL and certificate setup here) server on eg, chubby1.au-sydney.mybluemix.net.
  • Allow a ramp in pricing onto the Blockchains. We will not be able to afford it until quite a few years into production, even if we launch successfully.
For us as a start-up IT company (offering SaaS) whose entire existence revolves so far around the possibilities offered by the cloud and a PaaS like Bluemix, we are building our image on a "Mobile-First" reputation, and have the necessary skills to write our own financial recording/reporting systems, with master ledgers updated from journals, as well as the other bells and whistles required by modern enterprise apps. Bluemix allows our customers, people in businesses, to connect from the field or office, from anywhere in the world, and complete any (100%) of tasks available on the applications. Where the data to be recorded is largely text and numbers encodable in JSON format, real-time internet can be used very effectively to transmit requests and receive responses from the servers in the cloud. We arrange to save images and/or video recordings "on-device" until the user returns to an office or location where a wi-fi modem or hotspot can be connected to.
Not important at all so far. We have to develop apps that are reliable and most importantly predictable as far as outcomes from tasks are concerned.
Read John Olsen's full review
July 12, 2017

IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS) Review: "Good choice, some more features to equalize with others welcome"

Score 8 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
We were using container services from Bluemix - CloudFoundry PaaS to manage our applications. Apps were Java wars wrapped in Docker containers. Also Softlayer VPS's were used to provide for our Cassandra cluster, where we installed and managed Cassandra instances manually. Four VPS nodes total were in use.
  • PaaS
  • Watson (did not use in prd, just saw good demos)
  • Bare metal servers
  • At the time we used there was no direct Docker offering (had to use containers via CloudFoundry api, which is another layer to learn)
  • No hosted Cassandra database offering (or similar DB, like Amazon Dynamo)
  • I was unable to use VPN link with another provider: Both sides had incompatible configurations and it was impossible to instantiate working VPN connection. Support was only able to point that the other party uses settings that are incompatible with IBM.
+ General purpose application hosting (especially that uses relational database backend)
+ Cognitive computing that leverages Watson's capabilities of it's trained models;
- Column database support for internet grade apps and data-heavy solutions is missing
- is Lambda Computing available on Watson? (not that I am fan of it, but it has been getting some attention)

We did not use cognitive computing in our project. However I saw some demos of Watson and provided that it can do the same in real life, it looks very promising. Especially image recognition and the speech API (although only in English) look promising, and are very interesting features. I would definitely try them if there was a suitable need in the project.
Read Wojciech Kaminski's full review
June 23, 2017

IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS) Review: "IBM Bluemix - A Paragidm Shift in Cloud Computing"

Score 10 out of 10
Vetted Review
Reseller
Review Source
We use Bluemix internally and for our clients across entire organizations. Bluemix enhances the connectivity between different cloud services, so that data and code can be aggregated in one central place: The Bluemix Dashboard. While similar services exist in AWS and Azure, Bluemix makes the integration highly automated and reliable. Coders can self service their section of the Bluemix infrastructure without relying on cloud networking experts to do so. Database administrators can easily share and control access to data through IBM Data Connect across more than 20 industry standard databases, and though multi-cloud vendors.
  • Sends data from IBM Data Connect to Data Analytics in one click.
  • Manages coding in the cloud IDE with continuous integration.
  • Has tool chains which aggregate different services together into a complete process.
  • Has a dashboard that is far more in-depth and intuitive than AWS or Azure.
  • Basics like DNS and routing can be challenging.
  • Uptime is not at the same level as AWS.
  • Phone support is not at the level of AWS.
  • Absolutely for prototyping.
  • Ideal for inter-company data exchanges.
  • Great for shared managed coding by dispersed teams.
  • Excellent suite of starter code.
  • Excellent AI integration via Watson, Node-Red including for IOT.
AI is here now. It can be integrated easily into any legacy project. We have integrated over a half dozen Watson AI components into our clients' legacy systems.
Read Paul Levy's full review
September 19, 2017

IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS) Review: "Bluemix, promising for a small startup but a let down after further research."

Score 8 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
We were part of the IBM Global Entrepreneur program and were given the opportunity to use Bluemix or SoftLayer. We made an attempt to use Bluemix for a few small applications when were were dabbling with rebuilding the platform Meteor. If it worked out it would have been the main platform for the production distribution of the web application.
  • Bluemix makes it really easy to deploy new applications; they give you a good starting point and try to walk you through the process until its time to write or deploy your code.
  • They also offer basically everything you could need for your infrastructure in one spot, which is super valuable. This was an attractive option for us.
  • They support all of the most popular languages and frameworks, JS, Ruby, etc... and have a lot of boilerplate apps to get you started.
  • It significantly reduces the amount of DevOps work.
  • When we used it, it was super buggy which didn't instill very much confidence in the platform.
  • It seems kind of 'black boxy' like we didn't feel like we had much control over the system, so we were always kind of skeptical of the magic going on behind the scenes and how secure it was.
  • There is not very much interfacing outside of the IBM ecosystem. We we felt pressured to use their version control management and the task management tools Bluemix provided when we were experimenting with it.
I would definitely recommend it for prototypes and, if it seems to work well, maybe in some working environments and production. When I was using it I definitely only would have recommended it for raid prototyping.
We planned on incorporating Watson into our platform as well, for voice recognition. Bluemix would have made it easier to do this and helped us with that, but we ended up pushing the feature further down the roadmap. I've used Watson before with success, so I'm sure if we had chosen to go further with Bluemix, Watson and the AlchemyAPIs would not have been far behind.
Read Brett Bloethner's full review
July 21, 2017

IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS): "Test and iterate with the cognitive features of Watson"

Score 7 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
Bluemix is being used to create a platform for the delivery of electronic scheduling services.
Bluemix gave us the ability to iterate on multiple initiatives and micro-services with limited resources.
  • Prepared environment - the preparation of the platform was easy for us to spin up
  • Selection of services that we would implement. Limited need to search for varied sources
  • Our developers felt that the documentation was difficult to navigate. Time spent in the platform cleared the problem for the team.
Bluemix gave our team an opportunity to immediately begin building and testing solutions.
Our team built the forms and services they wanted in days without the need to manage a local environment and across geographical regions.
The solution that we worked on relied on making decisions based on user feedback and the cognitive features were exactly the reason that our company decided to use the Bluemix platform.
Read Damani Best's full review
July 19, 2017

IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS): "Bluemixed-bag of a review!"

Score 7 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
All the micro-services that are running to keep our VoIP platform alive are deployed over Bluemix. It provides seamless integration with our deployment model and reduces much of the hassle involved in the deployment process. Compared to a privately hosted infrastructure, a cloud solution the likes of Bluemix provides more flexibility while reducing cash burn.
  • Automation
  • Orchestration
  • Deployment
  • User Experience
  • Lack of a large worldwide availability zone options unlike competitions.
  • Certain clutter
If you're working on a new product and intents to design the same in a micro-services model, Bluemix is the goto option. It requires certain experience and training to get proficient with the tool but it's newbie friendly at the same time. Join us in using BlueMix as you major infrastructure provider
Though Watson is not part of our architecture I got some time to play with it and it was surreal.
Read Noble George's full review
July 18, 2017

IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS) Review: "Bluemix is a pretty good choice for emerging tech tinkering!"

Score 8 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
I personally build tech demos to showcase emerging tech and try to encourage others to do so. IBM Bluemix was great for me to bring in APIs like The Weather Channel data and text to speech to create a virtual assistant. I wrote about it online to teach others how to do so too.
  • Easy modular access to new functionality like text to speech.
  • Integrates well with NodeRED.
  • Documentation is really hard to search through and follow along with. Needs a lot more examples and guidance.
  • Pricing isn't clear a lot of the time. As a developer trying new stuff, I've been hit with charges and been unsure where the usage came from. Would be good for this to be easier to follow up. Had asked support staff and got no reply.
  • The interface can be overwhleming.
It's well suited to corporate clients who aren't as concerned by the potential fees (as they'd be much higher developing the functionality in house). It's also very handy to have the services delivered by a company that's got the reputation of IBM as it's easier to show that this is trustworthy and will have good uptime...etc.
Emerging tech like this was the reason I went to Bluemix initially. I wanted to try out the AI side of things, make something that's smarter than a typical virtual assistant application and see how well it'd work. It worked quite well and the potential is there for it to be used for so many things. That's exciting and a good sign of a scalable system.
Read Patrick Catanzariti's full review
July 15, 2017

IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS) Review: "Watch out....you'll be surprised, and then VERY sorry! Seems to be a great product--with limited to no support."

Score 1 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
Visual recognition demonstration for our customers. We used it for this single demonstration, which took only about a week to 10 days, and the results were presented to several levels or management and we well as 3 levels of customer management with VERY positive response. We trained the the Watson visual recognition tool with 1250 'positive' images of five different objects (250 training images for each object), along with 125 negative images (25 negative images for each object). Then we tested the visual recognition software with pictures of the same type of objects (but using none of the training images) to see how well, and how fast it performed. The positive hit rate was very good (typically 70% or better) with images of the same object, and the rejection rate was typically very good as well (again, better than 70% when the trained object was not in the image). It also did very well when we combined 2-3 objects in the same image. The really surprising thing was that the images could be screen shots (not terribly surprising perhaps), but we could also take a picture of the screen shot with a cell phone and use that--with almost identical results. (When these images were blown up they were quite grainy, so that's why we were surprised.)

However, the problems we encountered with billing, technical support (or total lack thereof), quickly demonstrated that this service was not something we could use for serious work or production.
  • Visual recognition. We put together a number of very effective demonstrations, over a short period (7-10 days) to show our management team as well as customers how it would be done, how the Bluemix applications could be integrated with other services (eg. Amazon Web Services, and Microsoft's OneDrive) to create one very capable, automated, integrated application that could solve one of our customer's knotty problems.
  • The visual recognition application was the only thing we tried during this 7-10 days period. Significant issues with technical and account support (there was absolutely none in any time of what would be considered a 'timely' manner, led us to realize that it was not a service we could use for production, and we therefore did not continue to try out other services.
  • Although we didn't get to the point of using several services, the services for storage and visual recognition, as well as those for integrating with other cloud provider services (e.g., AWS) were smooth and effortless.
  • ALMOST EVERYTHING. Account support was virtually non-existent. We had set up a trial account on the basis of how many training images we could use (they advertised that it was something like 100 per day--but it turned out that the actual number was for the entire trial period. Thus, we almost immediately ran into our limit and could not proceed. We set up a second trial account, but couldn't get that one to work at all (with no meaningful error messages to why it wasn't working). Finally in desperation, we set up a third account tied to a personal credit card. (It was the weekend and we had to have a demonstration ready for Monday afternoon.) That third account, although setup, also would not work. (Some of the problems could have been the result of not having three separate, easily available emails, phone numbers, and billing addresses to use in setting up the accounts, which certainly exacerbated the issues.) On Monday morning we were finally able to reach someone that helped get the 'billed' account turned up--but even they admitted they could not figure out why it had not worked on Sunday.
  • Over the period of about three days we made multiple attempts to reach both technical and account support. Generally the wait was something close to 24 hours, far, far beyond what we would be able to use in a production environment.
  • Technical support was generally quite a bit more helpful that the account support team. The technical folks were able to get 'stuck' and non-working account working again, but the account support team was completely unable to provide any billing information. This included how much had been billed to the 'personal' credit card (the one we had to use because it was setup during the weekend when our own internal finance folks couldn't provide a company credit card), and they were completely unable to provide an actual statement, either then or for months later.
  • One thing of particular note--the 'on-line help' feature for account services was extremely disappointing. There was absolutely no way to get any kind of billing or accounting information using the on-line services. You would think that you could, but you simply can not!
  • We were finally able to get an accounting almost 6 months later and ONLY because it had gone to some form of 'collection' department within IBM and they were trying to get the final $24 paid. (The biggest part of the amount due from the demonstration period, which was about 7-10 days and had amounted to about $350 in charges, at least 10 times what we had expected) had been automatically charged to the 'personal' credit card we used in desperation to get an account set up so we could get a very important demonstration for our out-of-town customers who were expecting a demonstration the following Monday afternoon. However, the billing fell across two accounting months, with only about $24 in the second month, but during that account, the bank had changed their association with MasterCard to Visa and had issued new cards and rejected any automatic billing to the old card. This left a balance of $24 to be paid, which we had no clue of. We noticed that we had only received the one bill, but not the second, but again, calls to IBM were either not returned or the people we reached told us they could not find out how much was still owed or how we could pay the balance by phone. Finally, almost 6 months after our demo, we received an email from their 'collections' department. We told them that we were not going to provide every 1 cent of funds UNTIL they provided us with an accounting of the services used, etc. That took a few days and we were finally able to get the $24 resolved.
  • We explained most of this to at least five different technical/account support people along the way. At NO time, did ANY IBM representative ever offer ANY kind of 'consideration' for the trouble we had had, even after learning that the company was unable to reimburse us for 'personal' expenses BECAUSE we could not receive a standard billing statement.
It is well suited to a number of applications we are pursuing, BUT, with the difficulties we encountered setting up accounts, getting billing information, fraudulent practices, NO attempt to resolve complaints, months to get bills and sort out payments, there is NO WAY ON THIS EARTH that I would ever, ever recommend using Bluemix to our customers. By the way, the ONE demo I was able to put together, at GREAT PERSONAL EXPENSE, over $350 (which due to your awful customer service resulting in me NOT being able to be reimbursed by management or the customer) was not only a huge success, but for a couple of weeks the customer asked me to repeat the demo for anyone who visited us. However, I let them know in no uncertain terms, that I could never recommend using Bluemix after my experience, and we would do much better utilizing competing services.
Bluemix was only two commercially available, cloud-based applications we felt could provide us the support we need for our cognitive application needs. It turns out, we will choose the other now based on the experience we had with Bluemix. Nice products, with reasonably good technical performance, but without any kind of technical/account support that would allow us to use it in any kind of real-life production environment.
Read Terry Higbee's full review
June 26, 2017

IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS) Review: "Bluemix and Watson, great choice for Enterprise AI"

Score 8 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
We use Bluemix primarily as a way to access IBM Watson's suite of AI APIs, for our own use as well as proposing as a solution for other companies. Watson is one of several AI options we can support with our chatbot AIs, and is especially suitable for issues where security is important and a local install may be required.
  • Local install options.
  • Security.
  • Often for large companies IBM is already on the network and it is an easier sell.
  • Kubernetes is comparatively new there, needs maturing.
  • Getting your app available as a third party is a longish process, needs streamlining.
  • Still some shifting around and renaming of elements of the Watson APIs that can throw off development, hopefully, all is now set.
Enterprise installs and customers who already run IBM solutions are great use cases. I'd love to see more variety in native language Watson NLP support, but that's an industry issue.
It's the primary reason we use Bluemix, we're an AI technology company at heart and Watson is one of many solutions out there with its own strengths and weaknesses.
Read Gary Theis's full review
June 26, 2017

IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS) Review: "Watson on Bluemix"

Score 8 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
Our product development team uses Watson APIs through Bluemix. We build cognitive applications in a B2C market for identity protection services. IGWW integrates Watson APIs as components of a daily “threat” monitoring service for consumers. Our cognitive application is developed to monitor news events related to software vulnerabilities, data breaches, online scams, and malware campaigns that are directly relevant to the consumer. The data are then extracted from the web, filtered, processed, scored, and presented to the consumer as a “threat alert” related to some aspect of their personal information security. The alert is presented with advice for mitigating the threat in the form of an “action”. Upon completion of an action, the user will see this reflected in their individual risk management plan.

Additionally, as threat alerts are generated, they are personalized and targeted to specific consumers using information contained in their personal profile. Some of the data points in a profile are automatically captured using social media data and Natural Language Classifiers to select attributes.
  • Good documentation and examples for integrating APIs.
  • Wonderful technology from an infrastructure POV, nearly on par with AWS.
  • Watson APIs are some of the most robust turn-key ML packages out there. Furthermore, one can take these out of the box in minutes and have a working cognitive app very easily.
  • Great support when needed.
  • Pricing tiers for larger volumes should be included. Also, costs should be evaluated on a use-case basis, pricing these types of services by number of API calls can be prohibitive for some applications.
  • Lagging in dev speed to compared to AWS.
  • Need to support batch processing for Watson APIs (I'm told this is on the road map).
[It's] Great for building simple cloud based apps or prototyping. It's particularly well suited for applications using Watson APIs.
[It's our] Sole reason for using Bluemix. Watson APIs are great, please continue to build them out. Build build build.
Read Grant A. Gelven's full review
June 20, 2017

IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS) Review: "Banking with IBM Bluemix"

Score 7 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
Currently, it is used for the development of an API for a payment services directive. We are a bank within EU and have to implement such a solution.
  • Speed - with a few regions we can always load balance for maximum performance.
  • Availabilty - anywhere, anytime.
  • Usability - everything in one place. Usage metrics and services.
  • Maybe a better user management interface. Every region and all users in one view.
It is especially suited for highly available solutions that need to run 24/7 across the whole world.
Our plan is to work on machine learning technologies and solutions but not for now. But in a period of 2-5 years.
Read Tomislav Petrinec's full review
September 12, 2017

IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS) Review: "A good service for companies with big guns."

Score 2 out of 10
Vetted Review
Reseller
Review Source
It ran our entire backend functionality. It is used across the entire organization and its impact is seen on every one of our customers. We used it to try to simplify our deployments, as they took a lot of time out of our day.
  • Large collection of tools to integrate with.
  • Growing application support.
  • Bluemix has the ability to scale easily from very small to very large.
  • Applications that were integrated had a feeling like they came from very different companies and organizations.
  • Logins had to be performed often between different services, once a week the applications would change and we had to learn a different way to do the logins.
  • Branding is important, but the names, like "Jazz" would get in the way of what the application did for us. So new developers would have to learn 5-6 new special websites just to do a single deployment. And one or two new changes a month to keep up with it.
It is suited to large businesses with somebody specifically in charge of deployments. He would be a person specifically paid to take care of all the machines through the Bluemix service. It is not a good situation when the teams are small, such as a three-person development team, because there is considerable maintenance that must be taught between them, and this costs a bit of time and hence money in that situation.
Our platform specifically didn't use it, but many of out customers are in AI, so we wanted to support this thinking.
Read Jason Brower's full review
September 11, 2017

IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS) Review: "Using Bluemix as the IoT platform for our clients"

Score 6 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
We are an IBM Bluemix implementation partner. We use our platform for proofs of concept, demos, and training, etc. So we are in the business for providing Bluemix solutioins for others, there are no business problems which Bluemix addressess internally at the moment or in the future, if you are not counting the license sales.
  • Rapid implementation for IoT platform
  • Rapid implementation of a micro service environment
  • Deep learning facilities available in the value stream
  • Surprisingly complex to implement some features, like port forwarding within the PaaS architecture without implementing IaaS layer features.
It's good for a quick PoC for an IoT setup with hundreds/thousands of sensor points that need to be provisioned. It is also good for building full stack web architectures with micro services and mobile front ends etc. Not very well suited in current state for complex back end solutions requiring network operations/analysis in the core service built.
Cognitive APIs were one of the top reasons for choosing blue mix.
Read this authenticated review
July 24, 2017

IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS) Review: "BlueMix-a-lot"

Score 6 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
For the past year I've run a personal website on auto-pilot that runs a few thousand API calls per month against IBM Watson Alchemy APIs. Hourly, I fetch articles from HackerNews, and feed the subject line to Watson API so it will auto-categorize them for me. Users of my website are then able to browse articles that are more relevant to their interests.
  • IBM Bluemix provides a wealth of powerful APIs. The ones I tried were easy to use and required minimal training to get up to speed.
  • I'd rate the documentation 9/10 as it was easy to navigate, had good examples and explained most of the possible inputs/outputs.
  • The IBM Bluemix interface itself was horrendous. Performance is a feature, especially for a platform as pricey as Bluemix. Please cure the sluggishness so it's actually useable.
  • Billing details could be improved so it's easier to figure out how much I'm paying and why.
  • Worst customer support I've ever seen. With multiple tickets, I never heard a response. Despite being a paying customer!
For low throughput scenarios, you can get really useful data with little effort, especially when building multiple applications. For high throughput use cases, I would suggest redesigning your product to work around the really high price point of IBM Watson. Under no circumstances would I recommend IBM Bluemix as a hosting provider in contrast to AWS or Azure.
The only reason for using Bluemix was because of IBM Watson and the powerful Alchemy APIs. That alone made it worth it. Tremendous value here, accessible to all. Keep building great stuff!
Read this authenticated review
June 22, 2017

IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS): "IBM Bluemix Review"

Score 7 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
We are currently evaluating the Bluemix stack to get more insights and to be able to identify relevant business cases. We are not yet using it as a production system, but only for test purposes. There are a lot of interesting services included, and we are also interested in offering our own services.
  • Bluemix provides a rich bundle of services you can use.
  • Bluemix is now integrated with some infrastructure components.
  • Fast ongoing development for services/offers.
  • Support sometimes does not respond to tickets in an appropriate timeframe (currently waiting over 7 days for a reply). Sales does not respond to emails.
  • The user interface and the integration of SoftLayer is weird, and it's easy to get lost there.
Using existing cognitive services is very easy. Getting things started for a PoC is also easy. More complex scenarios (like offering our own service in the catalog) is hard to achieve. I currently find it difficult to imagine operating a real production system in the cloud.
The Watson services are the defining difference to other platforms. Getting them up and running is (thanks to the provided tutorials) relatively easy. You can even provide your own machine learning models with the help of the Watson Knowledge Studio. This is quite expensive, but offers you rich possibilities.
Read this authenticated review
June 22, 2017

IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS) Review: "Why I chose Bluemix over AWS and Azure"

Score 6 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
I'm using Bluemix primarily as a means of centralizing data from multiple IoT devices. It solves the problem of providing a platform by which multiple multiple application components (e.g., database, authentication, etc). can be implemented quickly and with little time and money investment. This is an ideal setup for me because it requires minimal support for the infrastructure needed to host my end application.
  • Makes a number of integrated modules available seamlessly (e.g., mobile, database, authentication, etc.
  • The node js platform for hosting IoT components is extremely easy to use.
  • The node-red graphical wiring tool is makes it especially easy to integrate 3rd party services.
  • Excellent customer support.
  • More tutorials/education materials for Cloudant would be nice.
  • More flexible notifications for outages would be helpful.
  • More integrations to third party services within node-red would be useful.
My uses of Bluemix centered around IoT applications. I found the platform powerful and flexible to support my use cases. The node-red graphical "wiring" environment made it especially easy to create custom applications that integrate with third party services. This is especially useful in the growing the IoT field. The other major benefit of the bluemix setup is the ease in which one can integrate IoT services with SaaS options such as the Cloudant database.
I believe there is a lot of potential to use Watson services in the future, but my current applications do not require this functionality yet. Although I do see this changing in the not-too-distant future. Having them available directly accessible within the Bluemix environment will be extremely convenient with the need to integrate with these services arises.
Read this authenticated review
July 12, 2017

IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS): "IBM Bluemix Review"

Score 6 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
To my knowledge it is only used in our department, but then again some companies don't share information horizontally well. It's used mainly as a general hosting product.
  • Easy to use
  • Simple UX
  • Good design
  • Expensive
It's [well] suited if you want to use cognitive computing services and general computing all from one provider.
Read this authenticated review
August 23, 2016

IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS) Review: "BlueMix is starting to be able to give AWS a run for their money."

Score 9 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
IBM Bluemix is being used as my primary cloud computing service, having recently replaced AWS as my preferred service. I work with an IT consulting firm, and specialize in designing IT infrastructure for businesses, usually start-ups. My company has changed over the years as technology changes, originally setting servers up at the clients location, then moving to hosting them myself, and now I utilize cloud services with IBM as my primary source of server environments since software development is the focus of 75% of the start-ups I have been encountering, which is where BlueMix shines. Instead of detailing out how I use these services, I am going to explain the differences between IAAS (AWS/Google/Azure) vs PAAS (BlueMix, Redhat). The main difference is what level of control the system focuses on, when it comes to IAAS, the system is focused on infrastructure, such as building a server with x processors, x amount of ram, a storage system with X Gb of data. PAAS on the other hand, is focused on the whole platform that will run your software rather than just the simulated hardware specifications. AWS (IAAS) lets me build a virtual server with 2 processors, 1 gb of ram, 15 Gb of drive space, and 2 network adapters, which I then need to install an OS on, BlueMix (PAAS) lets me setup a geographically clustered environment that can serve HTML, PHP, and MySQL, while also being able to pull Microsoft SQL, while running a version tracking system, such as GIT. So from the start, I specify what I need my system to do to run my software, rather than what I need my server to have to run my OS, to run my server software that I can add additional functionality to in order to allow my custom software to operate best
  • Bluemix is great at providing a custom environment that offers everything I need to develop and run my software, rather than just providing a blank virtual server that I need to configure
  • Bluemix is very good at getting a "ready to use" environment deployed very quickly
  • Offers a wide variety of very unique, and cutting edge services. For example, I recently came across a Bluemix service that analyses any documents I want, such as email, and can tell me what emotions I am conveying. Is it a hateful sounding email, or a happy sounding one.
  • Documentation is lacking unfortunately, and while the new version of BlueMix is very quick and easy to use, it still requires a heavy development background to get features out of it that would end up rivaling AWS.
  • Stability isn't where AWS is, and while being a perfect development system, it isn't where you want to run a production site where downtime causes financial losses.
  • It is very hard to move your app off of BlueMix to another cloud service, as you just can't get the same level of platform customization, and you are going to absolutely be stuck to other PAAS providers.
IBM BlueMix is the perfect, and I do mean "PERFECT" environment for any business working with app development, which is becoming a very large industry very quickly, or an IOT (Internet of Things) oriented business. It allows you to very quickly deploy a custom platform to run and develop your software with, rather than quickly deploying a blank server. BlueMix is especially useful in any situation where multiple developers will be working on a development project or where external contractors need to interact with the development process. BlueMix is also invaluable for those who have an existing data source – for example, a company that has a large CRM system that has built up a large customer database and wants to design applications which utilize that data. Since the customization is in the platform, it is not ideal for companies that need to have mobility capabilities to move between different cloud companies, or any company that has software that requires a lot of server hardware or OS customization.
Read Craig Nash's full review

IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS) Scorecard Summary

Feature Scorecard Summary

Ease of building user interfaces (1)
10
Scalability (19)
6.8
Platform management overhead (1)
8
Workflow engine capability (16)
5.4
Platform access control (1)
10
Services-enabled integration (17)
6.7
Development environment creation (17)
6.6
Development environment replication (15)
6.4
Issue monitoring and notification (16)
5.4
Issue recovery (14)
4.7
Upgrades and platform fixes (17)
6.5

About IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS)

The IBM Cloud platform weaves together services, infrastructure and data to rapidly bring ideas to production. The vendor’s value proposition is that it simplifies the process of building systems that use data to understand, reason, and learn.

IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS) Features

Platform-as-a-Service Features
Does not have featureEase of building user interfaces
Has featureScalability
Does not have featurePlatform management overhead
Has featureWorkflow engine capability
Does not have featurePlatform access control
Has featureServices-enabled integration
Has featureDevelopment environment creation
Has featureDevelopment environment replication
Has featureIssue monitoring and notification
Has featureIssue recovery
Has featureUpgrades and platform fixes
Additional Features
Has featureBased on Open Source Cloud Foundry
Has featurePlatform data located in your geography
Has featureWatson Cognitive APIs available worldwide

IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS) Screenshots

IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS) Video

IBM Cloud is designed with choice of deployment in mind, even to suit the most sensitive workloads. The IBM public cloud allows the user to experience and tap into a world services across Watson, Mobile, IoT and more, in our public cloud environment.

IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS) Integrations

Nexmo, 84codes - CloudAMQP & ElephantSQL, Accern – Accern-API, aPersona - aPersona Adaptive Security Manager, Apprenda – Apprenda Cloud Platform, AT&T – AT&T M2X, AT&T Flow Designer, AT&T IoT Data Plans, BlazeMeter – BlazeMeter, Bitbar, Inc – Testdroid Cloud, Box - Box, Cedrus - Dreamface, ClearDB – ClearDB MySQL Database, Cognitive Scale - Cognitive Commerce, Cognitive Graph, Cognitive Insights, Cupenya – Cupenya Insights, Esri – Esri ArcGIS for Developers, First Data - Payeezy, Flow Search Corp - flowthings.io, Hella Ventures – Car Diagnostic API, Hiptest – Hiptest, Inversoft - Passport, IQP Corporation – IQP IOT Code-Free App Development, jKool - jKool, Kinetise - Kinetise, Load Impact – Load Impact, Mapbox – Mapbox Maps, Mendix Rapid Apps (Boilerplate Community), Moni.ai – Moni.ai, New Relic – New Relic, The Vonage API Platform - Nexmo, Pitney Bowes – APIs from Pitney Bowes, Plaid - Plaid, PubNub - PubNub, Push Technology Limited – Diffusion Cloud from Push Technology, Query Technology - TinyQueries, QuotaGuard (formerly Teachmatic) – Statica, Quovo - Quovo, Redis Labs - Redis Cloud & Memcached Cloud, RiskSpan RS Edge – RiskSpan RS Edge Loan Analytics, Rocket Software – Rocket Mainframe Data, Sebula - Searchly, SendGrid - SendGrid, Simplicite Software – Simplicite for aPaaS for Bluemix, ThinkData Works - Namara.io Catalog, Twilio - Twilio, Vaadin Rich Web Starter (Boilerplate Community), Vantrix – Vantrix Transcoder, Xignite – Xignite Market Data APIs, XpertRule Software – XpertRule Decision Automation for node-RED & XpertRule Decision and Rules Automation, ZUMATA – Intelligent Travel API

IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS) Competitors

Microsoft Azure, Amazon Web Services, Google Cloud Platform, Pivotal Cloud Foundry

Pricing

Has featureFree Trial Available?Yes
Has featureFree or Freemium Version Available?Yes
Has featurePremium Consulting/Integration Services Available?Yes
Entry-level set up fee?Optional

https://www.ibm.com/cloud/pricing Enterprise pricing is available upon request.

IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS) Support Options

 Free VersionPaid Version
Forum/Community

IBM Cloud PaaS (formerly IBM Bluemix - PaaS) Technical Details

Deployment Types:On-premise, SaaS
Operating Systems: Windows, Linux, Mac
Mobile Application:No
Supported Countries:Worldwide
Supported Languages: English, French, German, Spanish, Italian, Japanese, Simplified Chinese, Traditional Chinese, Brazilian Portuguese