KVM

KVM

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Score 9.2 out of 100
Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM)

Overview

Recent Reviews

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Popular Features

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  • Virtual machine automated provisioning (5)
    9.2
    92%
  • Live virtual machine migration (5)
    9.0
    90%

Reviewer Pros & Cons

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Pricing

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What is KVM?

Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM) is a virtualization solution developed by small Israeli software company Qumranet and supported by Red Hat since that company's acquisition in 2008.

Entry-level set up fee?

  • No setup fee

Offerings

  • Free Trial
  • Free/Freemium Version
  • Premium Consulting / Integration Services

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Alternatives Pricing

What is Proxmox VE?

Proxmox Virtual Environment is an open source server virtualization management solution based on QEMU/KVM and LXC. Users can manage virtual machines, containers, highly available clusters, storage and networks via a web interface or CLI. Proxmox VE code is licensed under the GNU Affero General…

What is Red Hat Virtualization (RHV)?

Red Hat Virtualization (formerly Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization, broadly known as RHEV) is an enterprise level server and desktop virtualization solution. Red Hat Virtualization also contains the functionality of Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization for Desktop in later editions of the platform.

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Features Scorecard

Server Virtualization

9.3
93%
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Product Details

What is KVM?

Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM) is a virtualization solution developed by small Israeli software company Qumranet and supported by Red Hat since that company's acquisition in 2008.

KVM Technical Details

Operating SystemsUnspecified
Mobile ApplicationNo

Frequently Asked Questions

Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM) is a virtualization solution developed by small Israeli software company Qumranet and supported by Red Hat since that company's acquisition in 2008.

Reviewers rate Live virtual machine backup and Hypervisor-level security highest, with a score of 9.6.

The most common users of KVM are from Enterprises (1,001+ employees) and the Computer Software industry.
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Comparisons

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Reviews and Ratings

 (16)

Reviews

(1-6 of 6)
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Score 10 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
Virtualization was a turning point in technology because of its flexibility and reliability. Before virtualization, we had to deal with all the issues related to bare metal servers. Linux Kernel-based Virtual Machine became the industry de-facto for virtualization, especially for *nix related guess operating systems. It is very stable and reliable for production systems. We use virtualized servers for more than a decade on Kernel-based Virtual Machine technology with amazing results.
  • Segregation of guess systems.
  • Fair allocation of resources.
  • Hardware virtualization.
  • Handling of hardware failures.
  • Hot migration of systems between KVM hosts.
It is a very stable and reliable technology. Highly recommended for *nix production systems. It is capable of dealing with large amounts of CPU, memory, and disk, as well as, network traffic. I never used it to virtualize Microsoft Windows systems.
Score 9 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
Linux KVM is a powerful and free (in the case of using Ubuntu for example) virtualization tool. In our organization KVM plays a significant role in DevNet related implementations (especially by using in pair of network appliances + KVM with a variety of firewall/router/VPN box images). AT&T which is one of our carriers and the most well-known SP is also using KVM in its FlexWare environment (Juniper NFX hardware + KVM + vEX/vSRX images).
  • Lightweight built-in implementation for all *nix based OS.
  • Easy to deploy and manage VMs.
  • Freeware (is you are using a free OS).
  • Monitoring features (unclear SNMP MIB DB, do not support by the monitoring systems, like Solarwinds and etc.)
KVM is the best solution in the case you need to test and turn up any virtual environment with limited vCPU/RAM resources. The obvious area of its use is a network environment when we want to avoid being tied to one type of hardware/vendor and being able to swap from one instance to another with no downtimes. The use of a vSwitch (that supports VLAN tagging) is a significant bonus for network engineers that some other hypervisors do not provide.
Score 9 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
We use virtualisation to segregate workloads and to reduce blast radius of certain classes of problems. Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM) is an open-source, flexible, and performant solution to our needs. It runs natively via virt-manager on SUSE-based products, which we use prefer for production usage.
  • high-performance virtualisation
  • no major problems with kvm
Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM) is available for Linux systems, and most of the time supported by the operating system vendor. I would recommend using Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM)whenever attempting to virtualise workloads on Linux.
Score 10 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source

For our company, Kernel-based Virtual Machine is one of the best virtualizations because It supports x86 infrastructure. It's open source and you can download it for free and use it for development on your virtual machine. I recommend it as it's easy to use when you know the commands and everything. It is being used across our organization for a couple of projects.

  • Handles everything we need
  • Runs multiple versions of Linux servers
  • Infrastructure of Kernel-based Virtual Machine is excellent
  • Limited support for paravirtualization
  • Not as good as OpenVZ
  • Sometimes felt that performance drops down
Kernel-based Virtual Machine is best suited for running on bare metal servers. It can be placed in any network zone and can be used in any business condition/parameter. Ease of use is great for Kernel-based Virtual Machine. Its command-line interface has great tutorials and help and makes it easy to learn and quick to adapt even for the newest user.
Valentin Höbel | TrustRadius Reviewer
Score 10 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
I am a consultant who provides KVM-based solutions to customers from all sizes and industries.

At the customers, KVM is usually used by the IT departments, providing virtulization services to all kinds of users, departments and maybe even their customers.

Regarding the business problems KVM adresses:
KVM manages to provide a Linux-integrated virtualization foundation which enables IT departments to provide virtualized systems very fast and efficient. With enough knowledge, IT departments simply install Linux servers and start KVM VMs. The time frame from starting until VMs are up and running is very short, so IT departments don't necessarely have to buy virtualization products if they use KVM.
  • KVM is really good at providing fast and reliable virtualization for Linux guests
  • Since KVM is a kernel module, every VM is a Linux process which can be managed by Linux system tools
  • KVM integrates very well with the management framework libvirt, which is why KVM can be integrated in automation tools as well
  • KVM itself doesn't ship with a management interface
  • KVM itself is a bit complicated to handle
  • KVM needs Qemu to virtualize Windows guests
Kernel-based Virtual Machine is very well suited when one needs a single-node virtualization host or needs to build a complex demo setting on their own notebook (e.g. when demonstrating solutions to a customer).
Stenio Pereira Filho | TrustRadius Reviewer
Score 8 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
We are using Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM) as part of our storage solution (OpenStack based). Our solution provides low-cost disk volumes to researchers to use for archiving and data backup. The volumes are provided by KVM virtual machines orchestrated by OpenStack Cinder. It was easier to implement this solution with KVM than XenServer Hypervisor.
  • Easy way to work with OpenStack
  • Better performance with the Linux OS
  • Lowest Cost
  • Complex networking
  • GPU processing is not fully supported
  • It's hard to set up without support tools
I recommend using KVM if you want to start a proof of concept of OpenStack services because it is very simple to configure and has much documentation about it. If your IT environment is Linux based, KVM is a great alternative to virtualize your infrastructure. It works with Windows virtual machines, but it is better with Linux obviously.
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