Microsoft Flow Reviews

17 Ratings
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Score 7.8 out of 101

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Score 9 out of 10
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We use Microsoft flow for automating tasks within our processes. As we are using an Office 365 subscription in our office, the flow has helped us a lot from downloading the data from Twitter to publishing it to Power BI. Flow has been a life saver in most of the tasks that I work on.
  • Scheduling the flow- this feature has helped to schedule the flow late into the night, so that the data is ready when you come to the office in the morning.
  • Social Media Triggering: Once of the major use of flow in our company is to trigger an email to us whenever there is a not-so-good review about the brand. As soon as we get a trigger from flow, we work on it.
  • Inbuilt templates have made most of my manual tasks easier such as storing your personal email to OneDrive .etc
  • Third-party add-on connectivity is a bit complex and not as seamless as Microsoft add-ons.
  • Initial setting up the automation flow could be challenging as it involves giving the right passwords, doing the right connections, but after that, things are smooth.
Well Suited: To automate simple to semi-complex tasks without an IT professional. Less appropriate: For automating complex tasks, For tasks that involved lots of third-party add-ons, When your flow involves pulling large amounts of data from a website. This will make the flow timeout at times.
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Jesse Bickel, MS - PMP profile photo
Score 8 out of 10
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Microsoft Flow came to organization as part of the O365 suite. It was an overlooked product as part of the suite early on but gained adaptation once it became clear you could automate everyday tasks across multiple platforms to increase daily productivity. The product is available across the whole organization but has seen early adoption in the IT departments and development groups. The main problem it addressed for us was allowing for team members to automate functions, organization, approval process and even tasks/reminders. We were able to remove other paid for programs such as Boomerang from the organization.
  • Allow for important tasks, reminders and emails to be automatically redelivered and pinned for importance.
  • Ease of template use and flow wizard to help those unfamiliar with its potential.
  • Integrates across the entire O365 suite which makes the tool easy to access and little effort to deploy. Simple licensing roll-out is all that is needed.
  • Self-help knowledge base is very informative.
  • If you do not follow the wizard or template it can be complicated to understand the early benefits of the software.
  • There seems to be a slow down of third party integration's and hooks. I hope this continues to grow.
  • Microsoft Flow lives in the shadows of the O365 suite. I think this product deserves more push as a key part of the suite. It's often overlooked.
Microsoft Flow is highly effective to those individualized work environments for those who have the flexibility to customize their processes. While the O365 suite is often available as a whole, in some environments such as campus life or education areas I could see this being less effective. This product is definitely geared for the office/business enterprise environment.
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Chris Carpenter profile photo
Score 9 out of 10
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We are one operating company under a parent company with dozens of OPCOs, and we are in the Life Sciences space. Our agreement with Microsoft is at the parent company level, and the terms of implementation and use cases are exercised at the operating company level. We have migrated from SharePoint 2016 and an on-prem version of Nintex Workflow to Office 365, and our use of Nintex has been discontinued. Many of our low-level transactional business processes, WIP tracking, and approval scenarios were automated in Nintex and now need to be re-created in Flow. We are currently building the plane while flying it.
  • Like all Microsoft tools, Flow does a very good job of shaking hands natively with the Microsoft environment (SharePoint, Windows, IE, Edge, Office, etc..). Flow has been able to use its standing in the Microsoft toolkit to help it pass the corporate IT hygiene tests that competitors don't.
  • With the transition from on-prem SharePoint to SharePoint online, the rules of engagement between external software (like Nintex) and the O365/SharePoint environment have changed. While not as user-friendly as on-prem Nintex and SharePoint 2016, it does have the benefit of cross-platform development within the Microsoft feature team, so feature implementation is not created in a silo.
  • Flow does an amazing job of connecting to data sources from products outside of the Microsoft stables. Flow's data connections can tickle most any source thrown at it and do something to automate the environment.
  • The paradigm for user-friendliness in workflow programs is Nintex Workflow (on-prem) and SharePoint 2016. Anything outside of that is missing the mark. Flow misses that mark, not because the capability is poor, but because the user experience is more developer-centric at times and it can require a verbose and complex set of actions to complete a relatively mundane task like approvals and notifications.
  • Templates need to consider actual work practice. A vast percentage of business processes that are automated look like works in process (WIP) tracking, approvals, and notifications (custom). These need to be foolproof, templatized, beautiful, elegant and a joy to implement. Flow has blank slated the process, not wanting to over-author, but this is one place where it's okay to get prescriptive. Simple containers for approval are okay to flesh out a bit.
  • Initiation and triggering still riding the struggle bus a bit. It's difficult to author a flow to focus on a specific event or item to initiate a flow. Flow wants to start its activities prematurely at times, too. On a few occasions, it has initiated and completed a workflow before the changes to an item have been committed, rendering the workflow to fail. I love an eager helper, but Flow sometimes executes via Fire, Aim, Ready method.
For users who understand basic coding and best practices of process architecture, Flow is a rockstar. Its learning curve is somewhat steep, but not terrible for a relatively tech-savvy non-coder. Again, this is a great tool with piles of connection options to data sources. The actual activity of WIP tracking, approvals, and notifications is what is at stake, and Flow seems to be able to handle it all well.
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Score 10 out of 10
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Microsoft Flow is being used currently in our organization in conjunction with PowerApps and other connectors so that we can automate certain business practices. The business problem it is currently solving is the automation of current antiquated practices and procedures. It also is streamlining a lot of different and often mundane tasks, in turn freeing up valuable employee time and resources.
  • Approval workflows, it makes getting approvals in a succinct order very easy and Flow does this in spades
  • Starting a workflow based on a certain "trigger" . Having workflows start when you want them to is far and away one Microsoft Flow's strengths.
  • Allthe different outside services you can interface with. It really is a impressive list. From Dropbox to Wunderlist, really amazing
  • One thing is, unlike PowerApps, it's not for everyone. You need some technical know how.
  • Sometimes connections get broken and you might have to recreate the Flow, which can be a nightmare scenario depending on how big it is.
  • Cryptic error messages, I feel we could be given more info when a Flow fails.
One example is if you need approvals for a Capital Project and there certain levels of approval based on the cost of the project. Flow can interface with SharePoint, see when a new item is created, check the dollar amount and depending on that, can determine who to send Approvals to and who to email. You can even replicate this with outside systems like Dropbox. This is one very basic example, another good one is time off requests. Same line of thinking. Really great stuff!!!!!
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December 12, 2018

MS Flow Beginner user ???

Score 6 out of 10
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Microsoft Flow is only being used by a small group of people in a department. It helped to query Azure AD groups members using SharePoint online list.
  • Flow has quick and easy approval workflow for SharePoint online.
  • Has many actions easily available to complete the task that would take you days/weeks to build custom.
  • Needs a better History log.
  • Workflow settings should have conditions to start the workflow, rather than only starting on "created" or "modified."
  • It is good, but not really finished for productive applications.
  • You can’t include the content of multiline text in emails you send out in the Flow, null value is returned.
  • Person field that allows multiple selections. Instead of not seeing the field or a nice message, it simply returns a null value.
To query Azure AD, and for small and quick solutions - Microsoft Flow is suited more.
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Microsoft Flow Scorecard Summary

About Microsoft Flow

Microsoft Flow enables employees to create and automate workflows and tasks across multiple applications and services without help from developers.
Categories:  Workflow

Microsoft Flow Technical Details

Operating Systems: Unspecified
Mobile Application:No