TrustRadius
Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM, formerly Microsoft Systems Management Server, or SMS) is a system monitoring and management platform with customizable deployment options. SCCM integrates with Mac and Linux OS as well as Windows to monitor system performance and vulnerability from a single console.https://media.trustradius.com/product-logos/7K/ip/88TRTK83XF39.jpegMicrosoft SCCM is the ideal tool to manage Windows assets at largeCurrently, we're using Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager to manage all our Windows assets, from PCs to laptops. Considering we use it across all organization, and we have a dozen of remote sites, some of them with distribution points, I can safely say that we solve basically 2 big business problem: We can manage all of those assets from a single pane of glass, delivering software with software-central feature, managing and keeping a eye on the status of those updates and also saving bandwidth at the same time, because we can deploy those software and updates from that distribution point, avoiding to have every single PC/laptop to download from the Internet itself.,You can run an inventory of your assets, from PCs to laptops, grouping them by location, type, department, all tight to your own Active Directory. That saves a lot of time when you need to report the status of hardware and software. You can even manage alerts to inform you when some hardware change has happened, which could possibly lead to a robbery. You can centralize software distribution, controlling what kind of software is available for your organization, and here's the most important part: you can give end-users the power to install/remove that software by themselves. That way, you can avoid a ticket to your service desk and potentially save money on those tickets too. Also, due to the distributed architecture of the product, you can deploy a component of the system in each remote site you have. Thanks to that, you can avoid using the bandwidth of the remote site, which usually is already limited, to download software/updates to each PC locally. You just need to download once for the distribution point it will deliver locally. You can also avoid the risk of having your local WAN to be contested by some unexpected outdated PC that was just connected to your network.,The licenses can be expensive if you are a small organization. Make sure you have a good deal with your Microsoft partner. Deal with collections can be a little hard sometimes. Collections are the say the product classify or organize the groups. As the concept is a little different from what we're used to, like Active Directory Organizational Units or Security Groups, etc., it's best if you spend some time studying this before you deploy the product in your organization, especially if your organization has severy business or business units and remote sites. You don't have as much product specialists as you have for other Microsoft products like MS Exchange, for example. So, make sure you hire a partner that have the skills needed to help you during the deploy of the product. Indeed, it is a complex product and it demands attention to details to avoid frustration in the future. People tend to save money on the implementation phase and that leads to frustration and, in some cases, projects cancellation due to underestimation of the requirements of the product.,9,We can save money and time giving end-users the ability to install/remote only approved software on their own PCs. That avoids expensive tickets on our service desk. We can save bandwidth having those distribution points on remote sites. Depending on the location, if it's far from metropolitan areas, bandwidth is still expensive. So, less bandwidth, less WAN circuit expenses, save money. As a 'not so negative impact', but it's necessary to say that you must manage the system frequently. What I'm trying to say is that you must have someone to be if not dedicated to that, at least, run daily due to dillegence to make sure the system is running Ok. Although you can automate some tasks, it's not an autonomous system. It needs some attention.,,Cisco Prime LAN Management Solution, Cisco IronPort Web Security Appliance, Zabbix,8,8Relax and let SCCM do the job for you to do other stuffIt is used by two departments, enterprise services (e.g Infrastructure Administration, Email, Sharepoint, etc) and Help Desk.,Patching lots of computers (in my case 400+) without leaving your seat!! Less administrative overheads. Deploying new machines with a standard image that is the same across the organisation and no one has a different set of image and therefore consistancy within the organsation. Provide a comprehensive inventory of the organisation's computer assets. Provide security auditors with patching compliance reports within the organisation.,Driver portals for different PC/Laptop manufactures. There is no dashboard for the executive summary of the organisation's patch levels. Being able to see the downloaded patches (labeled with KB numbers) according to their names on the SCCM server.,8,We have various retails shops around the country and have reduced the travel bill for our Help desk team who now support our remote retail centers centrally. Help Desk does not have so much work in patching as it is done centrally. Help Desk does not have to manually install Operating System images manually for many machines and this has reduced their work load and enables them to do other tasks. We have visibility on which machines' endpoint protection client is behind on security signatures.,GFI Systems,8,Netwrix Auditor, Microsoft Exchange, Skype for Business (formerly Lync), Windows Server,6,2,Remote Support for our retail centers which are all over the country Patching 400+ machines without leaving your seat Deploy many new computers/laptops image quickly for user usage Provide a robust inventory of both laptops/machines and Windows Servers,Easily identify users of machines seen as not compliant or picked to have vulnarabilities in the network by internal security scan tools without having to go around searching. This makes machine identification very easy Get reports of machine/laptops/servers if after patching when there is a Critical Security Bulletin warning of possible "wormable outbreaks" e.g Blue Keep The product helped us to make sure ALL our inventory is patched Uninstalling unapproved software silently from users who have Admin rights to their machines,Use it to manage Windows Defender on laptops/machines IF we ditch Kaspersky Endpoint Protection due to its high CPU and Disk I/O usage on our users especially during scheduled automatic scans. Windows Defender is lighter and has been identified on Gartner as a very good tool and better than any endpoint protection software Add a third party patch tool i.e ManageEngine Patch Connect to augment SCCM 3rd party software patching,10,Not Sure,Price Product Features Product Usability Product Reputation Prior Experience with the Product Vendor Reputation Existing Relationship with the Vendor,Maybe to find out whether there is a provision to patch 3rd party software e.g Google chrome, Winrar, etc,Third-party professional services,Change management was a big part of the implementation and was well-handled,Some things that didn't work properly spilled to users and causing disturbance and inconvinience WSUS caused issues and pushed all "approved updates" to clients independent of SCCM and most users were inconvenienced by the pending restarts The hard disk for the SCCM server was under provisioned (the update files themselves),9,Yes,No,I couldn't get to install a client to a remote server (417 kilometers away) which had a corrupted client and got help within the first initial email and I ran the command and it worked right there!,Patching multiple machines Doing a remote support Check forefront endpoint protection/windows defender alerts and managing scans and exclusions,Getting third party portal for 3rd party drivers Sometimes takes a long time to push a policy to client(s) Too many report list and can be confused what you are looking for,7Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager does it all, but you need to know how to do it, which has a learning curveSCCM is used across our entire organization. We use it for zero-day remediations, as well as large scale package deployments. It saves the company an immense amount of hours wasted for on-site support team members having to manually install packages. We can also pull reports of software versions across our environment and deploy patches accordingly for any PC that's out of compliance.,It allows users to install packages from a Self-servicing application via an app called Software Center. It allows for fast remediation of vulnerabilities across your organization. Provides reports for high-level visibility of your environment for upper management.,Building a collection and deployment takes some time to learn. It isn't very user intuitive. Getting up to date reports on a deployment isn't a one-click process. It requires triggering multiple events and waiting about 10-15 minutes I wish there was a dashboard feature built into SCCM. I manage the JAMF platform in my environment as well, and this is one of the key features I rely on every day. When I need to pull a report in System Center Configuration Manager it is just clunky.,7,It's saved countless amounts of tech debt in wasted hours that require on-site support techs to install a new version of an app manually. System Center Configuration Manager imaging task sequences are amazing once properly implemented, and save countless hours of manual labor. One negative impact is when the scope of a package is incorrectly done by an engineer, stopping that moving train is not as simple as turning it off. It takes time, and getting reports back of all PCs affected is not always accurate.,5,8,,Jamf Pro, VMware Fusion, Webex MeetingsSCCM: the market leader of client automation and managementWe use SCCM for a number of different use cases including imaging, OS and software deployments, inventory and desktop management. Its primary function is to push new software to the fleet. The benefit is being able to time when and what gets deployed and make it done in an automated fashion. We also use it to manage to patch existing software packages (in conjunction with a product called Ninite).,You are able to create queries to identify almost any combination of computers needed. Its direct tie to active directory. It fully leverages Windows functionality.,Its mac integrations, though improving, are really not much more than inventory. It could benefit from an enterprise remote control solution more similar to Bomgar or LogMeIn. Its web interface for reporting is very dated.,7,We are able to support hundreds of computers per FTE more than if we did not have an automation tool.,ZENworks Configuration Management (f.k.a. Novell ZENworks Configuration Mgmt.),5,9Very powerful and hard to work withSystem Center Configuration Manager was used as a solution for OS deployment, remote troubleshooting, and patch management for Windows PCs in our organization. The plan was to use it to manage close to a thousand PCs in total. As the product required an excessive number of man-hours to implement and support, its use was dropped after a year, and an alternative selected. The main goal was to improve OS deployment and replace WDS.,Remote Control works well and does not require a lot of configuration. It must be understood that the Remote Control feature of System Center Configuration Manager is different from RDP, as it does not establish a separate user session and allows a tech to troubleshoot issues in a way visible to a user. It is easy to add client devices for management, and multiple options are available (push, Active Directory, etc.) It's modular and extensible. For example, a third-party company, Parallels, makes a System Center Configuration Manager plugin to manage Macs from the same console.,Installation is very laborious and complicated. The number of things to manually configure during the installation is incredible. OS deployment is hard to configure and troubleshoot. The Microsoft article on deploying Windows 10 via System Center Configuration Manager in a test environment takes 44 minutes to read (Microsoft's estimate, not mine -- check here: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/deployment/windows-10-poc-sc-config-mgr). If something goes wrong, there are multiple log locations to check on both the server and client, making troubleshooting difficult. The management console looks old, and its performance isn't great. It is often hard to find settings in the console, and it refreshes slowly. The old name for System Center Configuration Manager, SMS, comes to mind often. "Slowly Moving Software.",7,As an educational institution, we got System Center licenses bundled with other software at essentially no cost. It was a great advantage of System Center Configuration Manager for us. The included remote control feature is useful -- many deployment solutions do not have that included. Zero-touch deployment will save a lot of work hours for a large organization when it works properly, as there is no need for manual intervention for OS deployment.,5,8,ManageEngine Desktop Central,Palo Alto Networks Next-Generation Firewalls - PA Series, G Suite, HPE Aruba Ethernet Switches, Fortinet FortiGate, Jamf ProSystem Center Configuration Manager: Your New Patching BuddyAcross all of IT, SCCM is used for deployment of software as well as Windows patching. It is used for both server patches as well as workstation patches—both laptop and desktop—on a monthly basis. It handles the patch process much more efficiently than its predecessor here—WSUS.,It's easy to group machines into separate categories, such as servers and workstations, or more in-depth categories, such as location X workstations and location Y servers, to easily target them for patches. Sending software to a workstation through SCCM is simple! Patching can be handled with bandwidth restrictions in mind, letting only X% of the wire be used for patching and even allowing the patches to go to a specific downstream server at a location to let all local workstations leech from there instead of the web or WAN.,It takes time to implement SCCM. Take advantage of an integration company whenever possible. Its capabilities are broad and can go so deep that it takes a while to understand just a portion of it. Get training whenever possible. Reporting is useful but could be expanded to more of a Power BI capability.,10,It took longer to get running than initially planned. Issues with the original setup have come back and groups have needed to be reworked. It has allowed us to be in compliance with the patching requirements set by the audit.,,ECI FMAudit, KACE Endpoint Systems Management Appliance, SolarWinds Log & Event Manager, MS SharePoint, Skype for Business (formerly Lync), Zscaler Web Security,8,4Microsoft SCCM may not be the ROI you are looking for, but the product helps your adminsMicrosoft System Center Configuration Manager is used for imaging our computers, but it is also used to deploy policies and software packages to specific users or groups. By utilizing Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager, the IT admins spend less time manually installing applications for our end users. It allows us to centrally manage what is being deployed to the computers in our environment and run reports on the computers and what is installed on them.,Centrally managing applications, configuration settings and policies makes it easier to deploy. So when someone requests an application or is missing the application, I can jump on the Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager console and add them to the software deployment and generally within the hour, the application is installed on their computer. It can be manually forced to pull the change as well if you don't want to wait up to an hour.,Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager does take a lot of time to learn and manage. There are a lot of bits and pieces to keep up to date (software packages, drivers, OS builds, computer model packages). It is not something that you can easily pickup and start configuring. And with automation, making a mistake can cause the scripts to take days instead of hours. There are frequently update failures. I understand many of these are configuration problems on our end or that the state of the computer is such that the updates cannot be pushed to it. But I feel like it happens a bit much.,7,I think it isn't as cost-effective as we originally thought, but it does save time when running properly. And being an admin, it is nice to have.,OneNote,4,6Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager is great for medium sized businesses and upIt is very effective for simple tasks such as pushing out Windows updates, Defender updates, and a large array of other software. We have also started using it for servicing Windows 10 computers. With the modern life cycle of Windows 10 being more aggressive then past versions, it has been extremely handy to use Windows 10 servicing to keep our computers running the latest builds of Windows 10.,Windows 10 servicing. Endpoint protection policies and updates. Reporting.,Surface Driver updates seem flaky. Sometimes needs some TLC to keep Microsoft SCCM and WSUS happy. Menu structure sometimes gets a little confusing.,8,Higher PC up time. Faster deployments of software. Faster deployments of operating systems. Automatic deployment of rules and management for endpoint protection. Reporting on PCs.,,Hyper-V, Windows Server,8,8Great tool for enterprise IT teams, must have usage experience for all IT specialists.At my current and previous companies, I have used System Center Configuration Manager as one of the main tools to manage my IT infrastructure. From simple management of active directory users and computers to detailed inventorying of windows equipment (computers and server), software inventorying, software deployments and patch management. Also, it is used as a main endpoint protection solution that includes centrally managed Windows Defender and ATP. We use System Center Configuration Manager as one of the main monitoring tools to get reports of the Windows patching state, device availability and activity, to get information about what PCs users are using at a current time. Using as the only solution to capture and image new and existing workstations and servers. And, also SCCM is the main remote control/assistance tool for our help desk department.,We have mostly Windows environments, so SCCM provides us tons of monitoring options for computers and servers. SCCM saves a lot of time and money for our Help Desk team to provide remote assistance to end users. In a Windows 10 environment, SCCM provides pretty decent endpoint protection. Patch management: tons of options of management, deployment, and monitoring. Systems Imaging: deploying images to new PCs or servers, reimaging existed environment. And of course, systems inventorying (hardware and software).,Initial configuration is pretty much complex and requires some additional time for preparation and deployment. It would be awesome to have Patch management and endpoint security be moved to separate tabs in the SCCM management console. Imaging functionality is great but over-complicated, and sometimes simple processes take way longer compared to regular WDS services. Better reporting and monitoring services with customized charts. Better integration of SCCM patching services with Windows Updates services on Windows 10. Sometimes it is almost impossible to say if patches were installed on Windows 10 via SCCM deployment until you get that information within SCCM management console. Requires a lot of learning about the product for IT personnel.,9,In our current environment, this System Center Configuration Manager had replaced several standalone solutions for patching, imaging, remote assistance, reporting, etc. That saved a lot of time and resulted in money to manage the IT infrastructure. Once SCCM is deployed and fully configured, all agents are deployed and it is easy to automate a lot of processes and just control them from time to time to make sure that everything is working as supposed to be. SCCM + Windows 10: great built-in endpoint protection solution. As a result, there is no need to buy additional software for that purpose. The imaging process is better compared to WDS because you can modify deployment packages and apply patches to a newly imaged machine. This saves tons of time for new employees deployment.,McAfee ePolicy Orchestrator, ManageEngine AssetExplorer, ManageEngine Desktop Central and Symantec Client Management Suite,Azure Active Directory, G Suite, Microsoft Office 365, Microsoft Exchange, Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2), VMware ESXi, Windows Server, MS SharePoint, Google Hangouts, Skype for Business (formerly Lync), Microsoft Azure, Spiceworks, SolarWinds Server & Application Monitor, Proofpoint Essentials for Small Business, Five9 Virtual Contact Center, Microsoft IIS, Cisco ASA, Druva inSync, Airtable, Slack,8,5Microsoft's Enterprise Management SoftwareMy former company used System Center Configuration Manager for software deployment, Imaging, and Microsoft updates. It was used across the entire enterprise, but my department only used it for imaging and application deployment. Before SCCM we were using Landesk, which I preferred greatly. That being said, SCCM does work well, as long as it is configured correctly. I would recommend it, but it would not be my first choice for deployment or imaging software.,Imaging from PXE boot, and it can be configured for remote imaging. Any IT department that has ever imaged 100 or more workstations with a CD and external drive knows that this is a strength. Application deployment. Sccm can be configured with a software store where end users can install the software they need. Update deployment, updates can be deployed on a set schedule with SCCM.,Imaging. I know that I gave this as a plus, but this is also a drawback too. Images take much longer to deploy via SCCM than they do with FOG or Landesk. The system itself is a huge learning curve and takes a great deal of configuration to make it work correctly. Remote Desktop Tool -- Microsoft already has a remote desktop tool, so why include almost the exact same one in your VERY expensive management suite?,8,Imaging: the time saved in having to boot to a CD and then image off of an external drive is priceless. Application deployment: time saved is almost uncountable. Windows Updates: unnecessary updates can be avoided, saving time and bandwidth.,Ivanti Endpoint Manager (formerly LANDESK Management Suite), Symantec Ghost Solution Suite and ManageEngine Desktop Central,Apache Web Server, Ubuntu Linux, McAfee Endpoint Security, McAfee ePolicy Orchestrator,9,8SCCM provides our company with support that is not matched by any other software.System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM)is being used across the whole organization on all of our Windows computers and our dual booted Mac computers. SCCM addresses the problem of having to have more employees to be available for hands on installing and updating any software that SCCM allows the user to do without another employee finding time to do it for them.,SCCM allows our administrator to push updates remotely and does not require our staff to do anything to install software/updates etc. SCCM lets us control licenses to software by allowing our administrator to only push out software to staff members when requested instead of allowing all staff to choose software from a list. Prevents unauthorized usage of licenses to software. SCCM allows periodic software updates to be scheduled even when our staff are not at their computers, because it does not require staff actions.,SCCM takes a long time to install once a computer has been reimaged and sometimes it fails. When the SCCM server goes down, no one is able to install anything and causes staff to be frustrated. There isn't a communication tool that tells users that new software has finished installing. Staff have to keep checking for software they requested to be installed to verify it was installed.,9,SCCM has provided a positive impact on our hours our technology staff has to spend installing software and updates manually. SCCM is stable and has very few instances of the servers going down. This helps us run efficiently and smoothly and not waste tech staff time. Our business objectives is to allow our staff to do their jobs with the least amount of down time. SCCM allows our windows users to keep running and allowing updates and software installs to run silently in the background and doesn't interrupt the work our staff does.,,BeyondTrust Remote Support (Formerely Bomgar Remote Support), Jamf Pro, Ivanti Asset Tracker (formerly Heat Asset Tracker),9,9The best tool to put things in order if you have a large company and use remote workersI use this tool to connect with my team remotely, and it has allowed us to have all the necessary information in an organized way and to have the documents ready to share quickly and safely. This harnessing has allowed me to build a real and very useful database, and allows me to establish service level objectives, review them, and generate associated reports. In general, it has allowed me to automate some processes associated with personnel management.,It allows me to increase the response capacity to the requirements of the users to keep the information organized and accessible. It allows me to build a really reliable database. It allows me to automate processes and establish a single point of contact per user. It is a very good tool to generate follow-up reports.,It is not an easy tool to use, it has many functions and tends to confuse the naked eye. The implementation is a bit slow.,9,t has allowed us to be more efficient and improve our response times It has allowed to increase the levels of satisfaction of our clients It has allowed us to be a more organized company,Oracle PeopleSoft HCM, Talentia HCM, Workday Human Capital Management, Microsoft 365 Business, Microsoft Access, Google Ads (formerly AdWords), Microsoft Yammer, MS SharePoint, Trello, PeopleFluent Mirror Suite for Talent Management, Zoom, Skype for Business (formerly Lync), Google Hangouts, Google Forms, Workplace by Facebook, Adobe Illustrator CC,7,10SCCM is the ideal solution for a large Microsoft-centric global organizationWe use Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM) globally across over 40 countries and over 15000 clients on Windows Operating Systems. It is our enterprise software deployment solution as well as software management for enterprise wide desktops and servers. We have previously used WSUS and Altaris but SCCM allowed us to combine them into a single seamless platform providing us with much greater scalability as well as better reporting of software deployment and management status.,Consistent deployment of software across the enterprise with coherent reporting tools for better management of software and patching delivery. Highly scale-able for large enterprises and/or geographically dispersed organizations. Great value added for large Microsoft-centric organizations that heavily leverage Microsoft systems and software. Minimal administration required to maintain the system over the years once deployed despite the complexity of initial setup.,Complexity of initial deployment requires 6 to 8 months of planning and preparation. This is one of those projects that will take a year to implement. Managing user roles in the system can be made easier with use of templates and a more robust role management tool. System and agent upgrades as well as patching the SCCM back-end systems should be easier. Offer a hybrid cloud-based solution with pre-built models and templates for faster deployment and appeal to mid-size enterprises.,7,Cuts down our software deployment and patch management time compared to our old tools. Better reporting capability to determine the success to fail ratio of a deployed software or patch and additional information provided to mitigate the failed deployment. Consistent tool usage across our global units with centralized reporting to monitor monthly patch and software deployment results.,,Epic Cadence Enterprise Scheduling, Primavera Unifier, AspenOne Supply Chain Management,9,8Asset Management, Software Deployment and Patch Management SolutionMicrosoft System Center Configuration Manager is used by our IT Operations department to create, deploy software packages for homegrown applications, commonly used software and windows update on desktop, laptops, and servers. It provides IT Asset Management capabilities as well as software inventory and auditing. The remote control feature is used by PC support for remote access and support solution.,Managing Windows Environments for patching, software deployment, and Inventory. Automation of software deployment. Imaging of devices. Asset reporting.,The SCCM console is a bit outdated. Needs an improvement. Better reporting, we have to rely on other monitoring tools for software and hardware inventory. Configuration and setup of SCCM can be quite challenging if you have never performed this.,8,Accurate information of all assets (Computers/Desktops/Servers) in our environment. Security compliance and ensuring systems have all critical updates. License management. Needs to be implemented using best practices to get the full potential of the product.,CA IT Asset Manager,7,8,10,5,Patch management. License management. Software deployment.,Imaging and automating server/desktop builds. Managing Unix environments. Vulnerability Management scanning for outdated/vulnerable versions of software installed and deploying the latest version of the software.,Integrate with a ticketing system. More options for license management.,8,No,Price Product Usability Analyst Reports Third-party Reviews,Options for package deployment and software scanning. Will run this on a few test systems and see what data is being collected.,Implemented in-house,Change management was a big part of the implementation and was well-handled,Asset Inventory for homegrown applications. ServiceNow Integration.,8,No,8,At the time of the upgrade, provided good support to resolve migration issues.,Package deployment. Remote control. Software center for end users to order and install software.,Reporting, need more options for accurate data. Can be complicated. Getting a fast response from support.,8Good tool, specifically for big organizationsOur organization is basically using SCCM to deploy some applications remotely, keep a record of each machine we have deployed to users, which is a must have to any organization and also for patching endpoint computers. This last feature would be perfect if it worked consistently, but there are a few complaints.,Software deployment - SCCM allow you to silently deploy software to your users without leaving your desk. You can keep track of each machine you deployed. Even though is not perfect, the patching feature is still very helpful.,Patching with SCCM is now 100% guaranteed. Sometimes it gets stuck with some patches, other times the patches simply won't show up, but this is just for approximately 10-20% of the devices. For some other features, they could make the path more straight forward, sometimes you need to spend some time in order to find what you want. Sometimes it takes longer for the software you deploy to show up to the user's machine, but that is not an issue, it's kind of 1 in 50 deployments and it just takes a little more time but works.,7,It had a positive impact on saving IT some time with deployments. It had a positive impact on saving IT some time with patching tools. It had a positive impact by allowing us to keep track of deployments.,Ivanti Endpoint Manager (formerly LANDESK Management Suite),F5 BIG-IP, Webex Meetings, Skype for Business (formerly Lync),7,8SCCM FTW!We are currently using SCCM across our entire company for software distribution, update/patching of workstations & servers, compliance settings for various items as well as reporting. It allows us to ensure our software and operating systems are up to date as well as ensures we are meeting certain requirements for baseline configurations.,Operating system deployments via SCCM are fantastic. They allow for robust settings in various formats and allows us to easily deploy new computers. OS patching made easy. The patching process for our environment is a breeze when using SCCM. We're able to easily roll out patches to test environments and subsequently apply them to production Software Deployments. There are so many options for deploying software that it's hard to find a replacement for SCCM. The ability to deploy to a user or computer is a wonderful feature. Not to mention having the ability to create a catalog where users can request/get software as needed.,Currently, we have no complaints with regards to SCCM.,10,The primary impact is the amount of time that is saved for deploying new computers, patching OS, and reporting for various day to day functions.,,ManageEngine Password Manager Pro, VMware ESXi, Autotask,8,5Microsoft SCCM is the answerExcellent tool for centralized and standardized configurations and software distribution. This tool is based on AD authentication like the rest of the Microsoft products and makes sending enterprise-wide updates automatically or manually a breeze. Metered usage for software, as well as built-in reporting, is excellent as well. Due to the popularity of the tool, there are enough resources online to get help on most issues.,We are using it for software distribution. AD based user access. Web-based.,Allow custom icons. Reboot notifications. Better reporting.,9,Client communication and policy compliance monitoring. Asset Inventory verification and reporting. Makes patching and updating the OS and applications across the enterprise very easy.,BMC Client Management, Symantec Asset Management Suite and KACE Endpoint Systems Management Appliance,EMC Documentum, MS SharePoint, BMC Remedy,9,9SCCM 2012 R2 ReviewMicrosoft System Center Configuration Manager is used by our whole IT department. Being part of a company that has multiple locations all across the world, SCCM is a must have tool for managing thousands of computers. SCCM is amazing for imaging, application deployment, and reporting. It allows you to save time and be very efficient.,SCCM has a very strong user community. One of SCCM's best feature would be the ability to push software through packages to multiple computers at once. What I like best about this release is the added powershell support.,Apart from the steep price, there is absolutely nothing to dislike about this product! Huge learning curve, requires a lot of training. Requires many prerequisites for installing SCCM on a Windows Server.,10,SCCM has basically made our whole IT department much more efficient with new hires and solving issues by simply re-imaging. Monitoring applications and infrastructure health. Being able to verify inventory and generate reports.,,Azure Active DirectorySCCM, When you know what you want to be when you grow up.We are a relatively small/medium company. I was fortunate enough to have enough influence to convince them to allow me to buy the Data Center version of both SCCM and SCOM. Having said that, we utilize SCCM within our IT Department to manage our IT inventory as well as push out critical updates and patches to our Microsoft Windows devices. Additionally, we utilize SCCM to track software licensing and usage across our organization. It has been a powerful tool for us as a company to enable not only the resource management functions, but leveraging the System Center Endpoint Protection (SCEP) product enables us to manage and take advantage Microsoft built in security products. The reporting is an extremely flexible and powerful tool that enables us to quickly visualize our inventory and assist with technology refreshes and forecasting our upgrades.,System Center Endpoint Protection (SCEP) product enables you to manage and take advantage Microsoft built in security products. Very simple to configure and maintain. Track software licensing and usage across your organization. Managing the ageing of our equipment and plan technical refreshes. Through reporting you can easily visualize your inventory and see basically any information needed to make informed decisions.,Configuration and setup of SCCM can be quite challenging if you have never performed this. Microsoft has very good documentation on this function and can guide a seasoned IT professional through the process. Keeping SCCM up to date can be challenging and I believe that this is a major opportunity for an area of improvement. There is a right-click tool kit that is separate that Microsoft should include in the console. Once you use them, you will understand why.,8,Positive Impact #1: Leveraging the Remote Access feature, we can simply remotely connect to a users workstation to assist with any issues they may encounter. We have multiple locations, so it is a huge time saver in troubleshooting end user issues. Positive Impact #2: ROI is different for everyone, but ours has been positive in that we dont have to travel back and fourth between building as often to assist users. This saves time, gas and ultimately money. Positive Impact #3: After you have deployed all the SCCM agents SCCM will start performing its magic. Inventory of your hardware and software is readily available in fully customizable reports that you can provide upper management for tech refreshes, etc. We also use the reports to ensure we have the right licensing installed vs. the licensing we have purchased.,,Veeam Backup & Replication, Veeam ONE, VMware vCenter Server, VMware ESXi, Graylog, Cisco Meraki Systems Manager, Cisco Meraki Wireless Access Point, System Center Operations Manager, WatchGuard NGFWSCCM is great for medium to large businesses but it's not for the faint of heart.We use MS SCCM in our organization to deploy and manage System Center Endpoint Protection. We also use it to deploy known good configurations of operating systems and programs for new machines to our network. We use SCCM to report and alert on the health status of servers and endpoints. We also use it to manage Windows and third party applications.,Patch Management OS Deployement Health Status Reporting Application Deployement,It can be a house of cards at times. If one little thing fails it seems like the whole thing comes crashing down. SCCM is NOT for the faint of heart. Setup is quite a chore. The setup process it NOT straight forward and relying on a third party walk-through is essential. Diagnosing what is wrong with SCCM can be a daunting task. Again... not for the faint of heart.,7,A positive impact we had when we implemented SCCM was that it streamlined OS Deployment. A positive impact was that it helped us get a handle on which clients were patched and which still needed their patches. When the patch management portion stopped working on our SCCM instance it caused us quite a headache and broke a lot of endpoints having them automatically upgrade to windows 10 without us being able to stop it.Massive software package with massive results.We use SCCM throughout all of our hospital and clinics. We use it primarily for distributing software, remote desktop support, PC imaging and inventory management. The simplest and biggest time saver we employ is the remote session sharing feature. RDP steals the session and remote assistance shares the session. The nursing staff loves this feature because it allows us to jump on their PC with no permissions or software to download. We are fixing problems faster than ever before which is critical in healthcare.,Remote assistance. Quickly resolve problems with the customer. Software distribution. Quickly push out software updates, patches and new installs. Also has a self service app that lets users install software with no admin permissions required. Software inventory. It's nice to run a quick report and find out how many copies of Visio we have installed or how many servers have old versions of .Net.,Because it's such a huge piece of software it's easy to get lost in all the features and functionality and without proper knowledge you can unintentionally cause serious damage to your network. The reporting could use a little cleaning up and beautification. No web manager, still need an application install.,8,We were short staffed and this allowed us to install software and image machines where we needed 2 more FTEs. This was able to do that process with very little human interaction and reduced our need to hire more employees. Nurses and front line staff who were registering patients needed IT to very quickly remote into their machine and fix problems and the remote assistance to help us resolve problems faster than and remote assistance tool we found. There is an option to allow direct access with or without asking permission. Our staff didn't want the software to ask permission, they just wanted the problem fixed. Our EMR vendor releases patches all the time and we were going around to each PC installing the patches one by one. This allowed us to push out the software to all machines and get a detailed report on success and failure.,,Lansweeper, ParagonERP, MS SharePointSCCM - Essential for larger environmentsMicrosoft Systems Center Configuration Manager 2012 R2 is being used for: Deployment of Windows 7 and Windows 10 client desktop and laptop machinesDeployment of Windows Server 2012 R2 and 2016 Server machinesManagement of Windows updates for Windows servers and clientsApplying configuration and security baselines and ensuring complianceReporting and asset managementClient and server inventoriesSoftware deployment and updatesApplication deployment and compliance,Windows deployment is probably the biggest strength in my opinion. You can build and capture an operating system image, deploy it using as complex a task sequence as you want. The functionality can be combined with that of Microsoft Deployment Toolkit. A deployment can be Zero-Touch all the way to a fully managed sequence. Update management is very good combined with WSUS. The distributed model of SCCM makes it good for ensuring WAN links aren't overutilized.,Further work could be done on the software and application deployment side. The ability to view the logs from the same console would make a lot of sense.,9,Compliance with baselines has been made very clear. It is relatively easy to produce clear and well formatted reports. Assigning applications to users or groups makes management very easy.,Altiris,System Center Operations Manager, VMware vCenter Server, CommVault, Dell EMC Unity, EMC VNX, XtremIO Flash Storage, Microsoft AzureMicrosoft Systems Management Server review (now called System Center Configuration Manager)Our corporation uses System Center Configuration Manager to manage our network of servers. It is being used less and less as we move slowly into the cloud and use the tools that are provided for us there. Our Information Technology department manages the service on behalf of the business lines that need the various servers.,We can change the settings on all the different servers using Microsoft Systems Management Server built in tools and interface. The reports that the Microsoft Systems Management Server generates simplifies our process of knowing what computers/servers need to be looked at or upgraded next. Microsoft Systems Management Server ties directly into our Active Directory.,Microsoft Systems Management Server is an old tool that we needed to upgrade. We specifically use System Center Configuration Manager that supports Windows 10 and it seems to be keeping up with the times. Sometimes the upgrade was not as easy as we would have liked. The support for other OS's such as Linux and phones is not always the greatest.,7,It is really good at handling software deployment. It can handle very many, thousands of clients, without breaking a sweat. The network savings on overhead because of its software management is good.,Swiss Army Knife for IT ProsMicrosoft SCCM is used for applications and configuration management in our company. It has allowed driving updates and PowerShell DSC without any issues for years. It was a huge problem in the past, we had to use several different tools to keep our environment up to date. Now we are able to replace all of these with only Microsoft SCCM.,Configuration Management Software dployment automation Updates management,Looks a bit complex for new users,10,IT problems are resolving much faster with SCCM,,Microsoft SQL Server, Microsoft Azure, System Center Operations ManagerMIcrosoft SCCM ReviewMicrosoft SCCM is used to manage all workstations either active or inactive found within the company's network domain. It is also used to deploy other resources to these workstations including, windows update, antivirus, and other applications. SCCM is currently being used actively by the IT department and occasionally used by the IT Auditors. The deployment of an antivirus application and other software applications on client machines was a major challenge as this was done on individual client machines which took a long time. With the introduction of Microsoft SCCM, deployment of such activity is done within a shorter period for batches or all machines at once.,Deployment of software applications to workstations within the network domain with ease Monitoring of Client machine performance through dashboard activities Ability to customize reports and also an adequate standard report preview,Not easily navigable when no proper training has been undergone,8,Reduced time spent on setting up corporate client machines Ensures proper management of licensed applications through the structured deployment configurations Proper management of system downtime through dashboard infographics and monitoring console,Unspecified
Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM)
133 Ratings
Score 7.9 out of 101
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System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM) Reviews

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System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM)
133 Ratings
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Score 7.9 out of 101

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Eduardo Viero profile photo
Score 9 out of 10
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Currently, we're using Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager to manage all our Windows assets, from PCs to laptops. Considering we use it across all organization, and we have a dozen of remote sites, some of them with distribution points, I can safely say that we solve basically 2 big business problem: We can manage all of those assets from a single pane of glass, delivering software with software-central feature, managing and keeping a eye on the status of those updates and also saving bandwidth at the same time, because we can deploy those software and updates from that distribution point, avoiding to have every single PC/laptop to download from the Internet itself.
  • You can run an inventory of your assets, from PCs to laptops, grouping them by location, type, department, all tight to your own Active Directory. That saves a lot of time when you need to report the status of hardware and software. You can even manage alerts to inform you when some hardware change has happened, which could possibly lead to a robbery.
  • You can centralize software distribution, controlling what kind of software is available for your organization, and here's the most important part: you can give end-users the power to install/remove that software by themselves. That way, you can avoid a ticket to your service desk and potentially save money on those tickets too.
  • Also, due to the distributed architecture of the product, you can deploy a component of the system in each remote site you have. Thanks to that, you can avoid using the bandwidth of the remote site, which usually is already limited, to download software/updates to each PC locally. You just need to download once for the distribution point it will deliver locally. You can also avoid the risk of having your local WAN to be contested by some unexpected outdated PC that was just connected to your network.
  • The licenses can be expensive if you are a small organization. Make sure you have a good deal with your Microsoft partner.
  • Deal with collections can be a little hard sometimes. Collections are the say the product classify or organize the groups. As the concept is a little different from what we're used to, like Active Directory Organizational Units or Security Groups, etc., it's best if you spend some time studying this before you deploy the product in your organization, especially if your organization has severy business or business units and remote sites.
  • You don't have as much product specialists as you have for other Microsoft products like MS Exchange, for example. So, make sure you hire a partner that have the skills needed to help you during the deploy of the product. Indeed, it is a complex product and it demands attention to details to avoid frustration in the future. People tend to save money on the implementation phase and that leads to frustration and, in some cases, projects cancellation due to underestimation of the requirements of the product.
Seems obvious, but if your organization's assets are all based on Microsoft Windows, this is the right product for you. If you have mixed environments, with most of the computers running Linux or Mac, I don't think you'll have the same results. Unfortunately, I can't say much about that, because my experience is only based on a full Windows environment, and honestly, I didn't waste to much time paying attention to other operating systems.
Read Eduardo Viero's full review
Junie Johwa profile photo
Score 8 out of 10
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It is used by two departments, enterprise services (e.g Infrastructure Administration, Email, Sharepoint, etc) and Help Desk.
  • Patching lots of computers (in my case 400+) without leaving your seat!! Less administrative overheads.
  • Deploying new machines with a standard image that is the same across the organisation and no one has a different set of image and therefore consistancy within the organsation.
  • Provide a comprehensive inventory of the organisation's computer assets.
  • Provide security auditors with patching compliance reports within the organisation.
  • Driver portals for different PC/Laptop manufactures.
  • There is no dashboard for the executive summary of the organisation's patch levels.
  • Being able to see the downloaded patches (labeled with KB numbers) according to their names on the SCCM server.
Well suited where you have a vulnerability and just push the needed patch without going around each and every computer and addresses issues where the patch was released out of band. This saves valuable time and definitely frees administrators to do other tasks. You can push applications to users without them requiring administrators privileges and therefore still not having to be present!

It's less appropriate when it comes to third-party software patching e.g Winrar, 7Zip, Google Chrome, Firefox and these are not covered by SCCM. I would love for them to be able to extend their patch management to other vendors.
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Adam Martin profile photo
Score 7 out of 10
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SCCM is used across our entire organization. We use it for zero-day remediations, as well as large scale package deployments. It saves the company an immense amount of hours wasted for on-site support team members having to manually install packages. We can also pull reports of software versions across our environment and deploy patches accordingly for any PC that's out of compliance.
  • It allows users to install packages from a Self-servicing application via an app called Software Center.
  • It allows for fast remediation of vulnerabilities across your organization.
  • Provides reports for high-level visibility of your environment for upper management.
  • Building a collection and deployment takes some time to learn. It isn't very user intuitive.
  • Getting up to date reports on a deployment isn't a one-click process. It requires triggering multiple events and waiting about 10-15 minutes
  • I wish there was a dashboard feature built into SCCM. I manage the JAMF platform in my environment as well, and this is one of the key features I rely on every day. When I need to pull a report in System Center Configuration Manager it is just clunky.
Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager is needed for any business with 300 or more PCs. It helps maintain application and security patch compliance. I use it for app deployments mostly, but it is also used for monthly security patch deployments by others on my team. The Software Center app is a nice bonus for end-users.
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Mark Fitzgerald profile photo
Score 7 out of 10
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We use SCCM for a number of different use cases including imaging, OS and software deployments, inventory and desktop management. Its primary function is to push new software to the fleet. The benefit is being able to time when and what gets deployed and make it done in an automated fashion. We also use it to manage to patch existing software packages (in conjunction with a product called Ninite).
  • You are able to create queries to identify almost any combination of computers needed.
  • Its direct tie to active directory.
  • It fully leverages Windows functionality.
  • Its mac integrations, though improving, are really not much more than inventory.
  • It could benefit from an enterprise remote control solution more similar to Bomgar or LogMeIn.
  • Its web interface for reporting is very dated.
It is an enterprise. You have to have some level of scale to make this product feasible. It isn't just something you throw into the environment to make your life easier. When you are managing thousands of computers, the equation changes and it is incredibly valuable. It is complex and if not done correctly, it potentially can cause a lot of damage, so make sure you fully understand what you are doing before you press the button.
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Score 7 out of 10
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System Center Configuration Manager was used as a solution for OS deployment, remote troubleshooting, and patch management for Windows PCs in our organization. The plan was to use it to manage close to a thousand PCs in total. As the product required an excessive number of man-hours to implement and support, its use was dropped after a year, and an alternative selected. The main goal was to improve OS deployment and replace WDS.
  • Remote Control works well and does not require a lot of configuration. It must be understood that the Remote Control feature of System Center Configuration Manager is different from RDP, as it does not establish a separate user session and allows a tech to troubleshoot issues in a way visible to a user.
  • It is easy to add client devices for management, and multiple options are available (push, Active Directory, etc.)
  • It's modular and extensible. For example, a third-party company, Parallels, makes a System Center Configuration Manager plugin to manage Macs from the same console.
  • Installation is very laborious and complicated. The number of things to manually configure during the installation is incredible.
  • OS deployment is hard to configure and troubleshoot. The Microsoft article on deploying Windows 10 via System Center Configuration Manager in a test environment takes 44 minutes to read (Microsoft's estimate, not mine -- check here: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/deployment/windows-10-poc-sc-config-mgr). If something goes wrong, there are multiple log locations to check on both the server and client, making troubleshooting difficult.
  • The management console looks old, and its performance isn't great. It is often hard to find settings in the console, and it refreshes slowly. The old name for System Center Configuration Manager, SMS, comes to mind often. "Slowly Moving Software."
I know many people have a great experience with System Center Configuration Manager, but it is not suitable for organizations that cannot commit a significant amount of time to configuration and deployment. For example, my organization uses Jamf Pro for Mac management. It took me a couple of days to configure every setting needed for an adequate Mac deployment. System Center Configuration Manager took way longer. Most MSPs in our area do not want to deal with it due to its complexity either. A big organization will find the product more suitable, as configuration tasks are the same whether an organization has 1000 or 10,000 computers, the installation will be more useful with scale. In my case, trying to deploy System Center Configuration Manager as a personal project while doing other tasks was not a success.
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Score 10 out of 10
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Across all of IT, SCCM is used for deployment of software as well as Windows patching. It is used for both server patches as well as workstation patches—both laptop and desktop—on a monthly basis. It handles the patch process much more efficiently than its predecessor here—WSUS.
  • It's easy to group machines into separate categories, such as servers and workstations, or more in-depth categories, such as location X workstations and location Y servers, to easily target them for patches.
  • Sending software to a workstation through SCCM is simple!
  • Patching can be handled with bandwidth restrictions in mind, letting only X% of the wire be used for patching and even allowing the patches to go to a specific downstream server at a location to let all local workstations leech from there instead of the web or WAN.
  • It takes time to implement SCCM. Take advantage of an integration company whenever possible.
  • Its capabilities are broad and can go so deep that it takes a while to understand just a portion of it. Get training whenever possible.
  • Reporting is useful but could be expanded to more of a Power BI capability.
Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager is great for companies of all sizes, national or international. Its scalability and pinpoint accuracy can be used in all scenarios. However, use downstream servers as distribution points to save on bandwidth and ensure timely updates and easier deployment of individual software packages.
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Score 7 out of 10
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Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager is used for imaging our computers, but it is also used to deploy policies and software packages to specific users or groups.

By utilizing Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager, the IT admins spend less time manually installing applications for our end users. It allows us to centrally manage what is being deployed to the computers in our environment and run reports on the computers and what is installed on them.
  • Centrally managing applications, configuration settings and policies makes it easier to deploy. So when someone requests an application or is missing the application, I can jump on the Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager console and add them to the software deployment and generally within the hour, the application is installed on their computer. It can be manually forced to pull the change as well if you don't want to wait up to an hour.
  • Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager does take a lot of time to learn and manage. There are a lot of bits and pieces to keep up to date (software packages, drivers, OS builds, computer model packages). It is not something that you can easily pickup and start configuring. And with automation, making a mistake can cause the scripts to take days instead of hours.
  • There are frequently update failures. I understand many of these are configuration problems on our end or that the state of the computer is such that the updates cannot be pushed to it. But I feel like it happens a bit much.
I think it works well enough and helps a lot for a number of scenarios in IT. However, make sure you understand the task ahead and how many hours it will take to maintain. The trade off might not be as good as you think.
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Score 8 out of 10
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It is very effective for simple tasks such as pushing out Windows updates, Defender updates, and a large array of other software. We have also started using it for servicing Windows 10 computers. With the modern life cycle of Windows 10 being more aggressive then past versions, it has been extremely handy to use Windows 10 servicing to keep our computers running the latest builds of Windows 10.
  • Windows 10 servicing.
  • Endpoint protection policies and updates.
  • Reporting.
  • Surface Driver updates seem flaky.
  • Sometimes needs some TLC to keep Microsoft SCCM and WSUS happy.
  • Menu structure sometimes gets a little confusing.
Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager isn't too useful for smaller companies. But with businesses of 100+ users and PCs, it is very handy. It allows you to report on and manage all of those PCs. I can easily push out new software to certain PCs. and ensure they are always fresh with either the latest updates or latest builds of Windows.
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Valery Mezentsau profile photo
Score 9 out of 10
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At my current and previous companies, I have used System Center Configuration Manager as one of the main tools to manage my IT infrastructure. From simple management of active directory users and computers to detailed inventorying of windows equipment (computers and server), software inventorying, software deployments and patch management. Also, it is used as a main endpoint protection solution that includes centrally managed Windows Defender and ATP. We use System Center Configuration Manager as one of the main monitoring tools to get reports of the Windows patching state, device availability and activity, to get information about what PCs users are using at a current time. Using as the only solution to capture and image new and existing workstations and servers. And, also SCCM is the main remote control/assistance tool for our help desk department.
  • We have mostly Windows environments, so SCCM provides us tons of monitoring options for computers and servers.
  • SCCM saves a lot of time and money for our Help Desk team to provide remote assistance to end users.
  • In a Windows 10 environment, SCCM provides pretty decent endpoint protection.
  • Patch management: tons of options of management, deployment, and monitoring.
  • Systems Imaging: deploying images to new PCs or servers, reimaging existed environment.
  • And of course, systems inventorying (hardware and software).
  • Initial configuration is pretty much complex and requires some additional time for preparation and deployment.
  • It would be awesome to have Patch management and endpoint security be moved to separate tabs in the SCCM management console.
  • Imaging functionality is great but over-complicated, and sometimes simple processes take way longer compared to regular WDS services.
  • Better reporting and monitoring services with customized charts.
  • Better integration of SCCM patching services with Windows Updates services on Windows 10. Sometimes it is almost impossible to say if patches were installed on Windows 10 via SCCM deployment until you get that information within SCCM management console.
  • Requires a lot of learning about the product for IT personnel.
This is a great work frame for managing your IT infrastructure. Tons of different options to configure systems, to manage software inventorying and deployments, patch management, systems imaging, etc. It is too hard to find a similar solution with the same number of features and options under the single management console. However, you still need to get third-party products to manage your network and Unix/Linix systems. And, of course, you need to be prepared before starting to use SCCM, it requires a lot of knowledge of the product and predeployment work to be done in advance.
Read Valery Mezentsau's full review
Michael Timms profile photo
Score 8 out of 10
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My former company used System Center Configuration Manager for software deployment, Imaging, and Microsoft updates. It was used across the entire enterprise, but my department only used it for imaging and application deployment. Before SCCM we were using Landesk, which I preferred greatly. That being said, SCCM does work well, as long as it is configured correctly. I would recommend it, but it would not be my first choice for deployment or imaging software.
  • Imaging from PXE boot, and it can be configured for remote imaging. Any IT department that has ever imaged 100 or more workstations with a CD and external drive knows that this is a strength.
  • Application deployment. Sccm can be configured with a software store where end users can install the software they need.
  • Update deployment, updates can be deployed on a set schedule with SCCM.
  • Imaging. I know that I gave this as a plus, but this is also a drawback too. Images take much longer to deploy via SCCM than they do with FOG or Landesk.
  • The system itself is a huge learning curve and takes a great deal of configuration to make it work correctly.
  • Remote Desktop Tool -- Microsoft already has a remote desktop tool, so why include almost the exact same one in your VERY expensive management suite?
Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager would be best suited in a large scale enterprise with multiple locations, and plenty of money to spread around. Also, you need an IT team that knows how to research to set it up and configure it correctly. It works well and you can make it do pretty much what you need it to do IF you are willing to put in the time and research to configure it correctly. If you are a smaller company, with say, one location though, there are much cheaper alternatives that have the same, if not more features.
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Angel Swalve profile photo
Score 9 out of 10
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System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM)is being used across the whole organization on all of our Windows computers and our dual booted Mac computers. SCCM addresses the problem of having to have more employees to be available for hands on installing and updating any software that SCCM allows the user to do without another employee finding time to do it for them.
  • SCCM allows our administrator to push updates remotely and does not require our staff to do anything to install software/updates etc.
  • SCCM lets us control licenses to software by allowing our administrator to only push out software to staff members when requested instead of allowing all staff to choose software from a list. Prevents unauthorized usage of licenses to software.
  • SCCM allows periodic software updates to be scheduled even when our staff are not at their computers, because it does not require staff actions.
  • SCCM takes a long time to install once a computer has been reimaged and sometimes it fails.
  • When the SCCM server goes down, no one is able to install anything and causes staff to be frustrated.
  • There isn't a communication tool that tells users that new software has finished installing. Staff have to keep checking for software they requested to be installed to verify it was installed.
SCCM provides our company a great support tool allowing our administrator to work behind the scenes and eliminates the staff it would take to touch each computer individually to install software and updates.
It is less appropriate for communication as it does not notify user once software has been updated or installed.
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Yamileth Cabrera Rendon profile photo
Score 9 out of 10
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I use this tool to connect with my team remotely, and it has allowed us to have all the necessary information in an organized way and to have the documents ready to share quickly and safely. This harnessing has allowed me to build a real and very useful database, and allows me to establish service level objectives, review them, and generate associated reports.
In general, it has allowed me to automate some processes associated with personnel management.
  • It allows me to increase the response capacity to the requirements of the users to keep the information organized and accessible.
  • It allows me to build a really reliable database.
  • It allows me to automate processes and establish a single point of contact per user.
  • It is a very good tool to generate follow-up reports.
  • It is not an easy tool to use, it has many functions and tends to confuse the naked eye.
  • The implementation is a bit slow.
I recommend it for:
  • As a business management tool for large corporations with teams in different locations or places or doing remote work.
  • Following up on requests and generating reports of satisfaction.
  • If you need to organize and automate your processes.
I do not recommend it for:
  • If they need a quick implementation.
  • A small company with few work roles.
Read Yamileth Cabrera Rendon's full review
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Score 7 out of 10
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We use Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM) globally across over 40 countries and over 15000 clients on Windows Operating Systems. It is our enterprise software deployment solution as well as software management for enterprise wide desktops and servers. We have previously used WSUS and Altaris but SCCM allowed us to combine them into a single seamless platform providing us with much greater scalability as well as better reporting of software deployment and management status.
  • Consistent deployment of software across the enterprise with coherent reporting tools for better management of software and patching delivery.
  • Highly scale-able for large enterprises and/or geographically dispersed organizations.
  • Great value added for large Microsoft-centric organizations that heavily leverage Microsoft systems and software.
  • Minimal administration required to maintain the system over the years once deployed despite the complexity of initial setup.
  • Complexity of initial deployment requires 6 to 8 months of planning and preparation. This is one of those projects that will take a year to implement.
  • Managing user roles in the system can be made easier with use of templates and a more robust role management tool.
  • System and agent upgrades as well as patching the SCCM back-end systems should be easier.
  • Offer a hybrid cloud-based solution with pre-built models and templates for faster deployment and appeal to mid-size enterprises.
SCCM is great for large global organizations with over 10,000 devices to manage or more. It is an excellent choice for a Microsoft-centric environment and pretty much the gold standard to for software deployment and patch management for Microsoft operating system devices. If you have a more mixed environment with Linux and Mac OS X, you may want to look at Altiris or WSUS, but keep in mind those products are less scalable.
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Score 8 out of 10
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Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager is used by our IT Operations department to create, deploy software packages for homegrown applications, commonly used software and windows update on desktop, laptops, and servers. It provides IT Asset Management capabilities as well as software inventory and auditing. The remote control feature is used by PC support for remote access and support solution.
  • Managing Windows Environments for patching, software deployment, and Inventory.
  • Automation of software deployment.
  • Imaging of devices.
  • Asset reporting.
  • The SCCM console is a bit outdated. Needs an improvement.
  • Better reporting, we have to rely on other monitoring tools for software and hardware inventory.
  • Configuration and setup of SCCM can be quite challenging if you have never performed this.
Well Suited:
  • System Center Endpoint Protection (SCEP) product enables you to manage and take advantage of Microsoft's built-in security products.
  • For our Desktop Support team, using the remote client to log in to PCs to troubleshoot Issue.
  • Easy for patch management and package deployment. Easy to create packages/collections and create dynamic groups for software deployment.
Less Appropriate:
  • Reporting.
  • Documentation and Training. Software and Licensing of the product are cheap, professional services are not.
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Score 7 out of 10
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Our organization is basically using SCCM to deploy some applications remotely, keep a record of each machine we have deployed to users, which is a must have to any organization and also for patching endpoint computers. This last feature would be perfect if it worked consistently, but there are a few complaints.
  • Software deployment - SCCM allow you to silently deploy software to your users without leaving your desk.
  • You can keep track of each machine you deployed.
  • Even though is not perfect, the patching feature is still very helpful.
  • Patching with SCCM is now 100% guaranteed. Sometimes it gets stuck with some patches, other times the patches simply won't show up, but this is just for approximately 10-20% of the devices.
  • For some other features, they could make the path more straight forward, sometimes you need to spend some time in order to find what you want.
  • Sometimes it takes longer for the software you deploy to show up to the user's machine, but that is not an issue, it's kind of 1 in 50 deployments and it just takes a little more time but works.
Well, in my opinion, SCCM is a good tool for any kind of scenario, but if I had to choose I would say it's great mostly for big companies that have hundreds of employees. I wouldn't say SCCM is really needed for small companies with just a few employees where you can do deployments and upgrades manually.
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March 14, 2019

SCCM FTW!

Score 10 out of 10
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We are currently using SCCM across our entire company for software distribution, update/patching of workstations & servers, compliance settings for various items as well as reporting. It allows us to ensure our software and operating systems are up to date as well as ensures we are meeting certain requirements for baseline configurations.
  • Operating system deployments via SCCM are fantastic. They allow for robust settings in various formats and allows us to easily deploy new computers.
  • OS patching made easy. The patching process for our environment is a breeze when using SCCM. We're able to easily roll out patches to test environments and subsequently apply them to production
  • Software Deployments. There are so many options for deploying software that it's hard to find a replacement for SCCM. The ability to deploy to a user or computer is a wonderful feature. Not to mention having the ability to create a catalog where users can request/get software as needed.
  • Currently, we have no complaints with regards to SCCM.
The features and benefits of using SCCM are too hard to describe in detail but at a high-level overview the reporting, inventory, patching, management, and software/OSD options make this a wonderful investment. With regards to reporting, specifically finding out all hardware information for a group of computers, is vital to operations when planning for hardware refresh cycles. And having the ability to PXE boot a computer, give it a name, start the imaging process, and have it complete all the steps on its own saves hours of time.
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Score 9 out of 10
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Excellent tool for centralized and standardized configurations and software distribution. This tool is based on AD authentication like the rest of the Microsoft products and makes sending enterprise-wide updates automatically or manually a breeze. Metered usage for software, as well as built-in reporting, is excellent as well. Due to the popularity of the tool, there are enough resources online to get help on most issues.
  • We are using it for software distribution.
  • AD based user access.
  • Web-based.
  • Allow custom icons.
  • Reboot notifications.
  • Better reporting.
It well suited for most organizations where standardization is a need. The learning curve can be steep at times, but once it's fully implemented, it's well worth the effort. Ongoing premier support might be expensive for smaller companies. The baseline implementation has to be done right from the ground up.
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November 30, 2018

SCCM 2012 R2 Review

Score 10 out of 10
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Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager is used by our whole IT department. Being part of a company that has multiple locations all across the world, SCCM is a must have tool for managing thousands of computers. SCCM is amazing for imaging, application deployment, and reporting. It allows you to save time and be very efficient.
  • SCCM has a very strong user community.
  • One of SCCM's best feature would be the ability to push software through packages to multiple computers at once.
  • What I like best about this release is the added powershell support.
  • Apart from the steep price, there is absolutely nothing to dislike about this product!
  • Huge learning curve, requires a lot of training.
  • Requires many prerequisites for installing SCCM on a Windows Server.
This software will greatly improve your organization and save you countless hours. If your company is still using Acronis or other small solutions, do them a favor by recommending them SCCM. SCCM is simply the greatest deployment solution on the market. I would highly recommend taking courses to obtain the best performance on the system.
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Score 8 out of 10
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We are a relatively small/medium company. I was fortunate enough to have enough influence to convince them to allow me to buy the Data Center version of both SCCM and SCOM. Having said that, we utilize SCCM within our IT Department to manage our IT inventory as well as push out critical updates and patches to our Microsoft Windows devices. Additionally, we utilize SCCM to track software licensing and usage across our organization. It has been a powerful tool for us as a company to enable not only the resource management functions, but leveraging the System Center Endpoint Protection (SCEP) product enables us to manage and take advantage Microsoft built in security products. The reporting is an extremely flexible and powerful tool that enables us to quickly visualize our inventory and assist with technology refreshes and forecasting our upgrades.
  • System Center Endpoint Protection (SCEP) product enables you to manage and take advantage Microsoft built in security products. Very simple to configure and maintain.
  • Track software licensing and usage across your organization.
  • Managing the ageing of our equipment and plan technical refreshes. Through reporting you can easily visualize your inventory and see basically any information needed to make informed decisions.
  • Configuration and setup of SCCM can be quite challenging if you have never performed this. Microsoft has very good documentation on this function and can guide a seasoned IT professional through the process.
  • Keeping SCCM up to date can be challenging and I believe that this is a major opportunity for an area of improvement.
  • There is a right-click tool kit that is separate that Microsoft should include in the console. Once you use them, you will understand why.
While there are other products that can perform functions that SCCM provides, I would still recommend SCCM due to the vast array of features that it provides IT professionals. Most great products that I have used require some configuration to ensure they are a useful tool that we as administrators and managers can utilize to extract data relating to our environment. SCCM can do just that.
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Brandon Holbrook profile photo
Score 7 out of 10
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We use MS SCCM in our organization to deploy and manage System Center Endpoint Protection. We also use it to deploy known good configurations of operating systems and programs for new machines to our network. We use SCCM to report and alert on the health status of servers and endpoints. We also use it to manage Windows and third party applications.
  • Patch Management
  • OS Deployement
  • Health Status Reporting
  • Application Deployement
  • It can be a house of cards at times. If one little thing fails it seems like the whole thing comes crashing down. SCCM is NOT for the faint of heart.
  • Setup is quite a chore. The setup process it NOT straight forward and relying on a third party walk-through is essential.
  • Diagnosing what is wrong with SCCM can be a daunting task. Again... not for the faint of heart.
If you are a small company with only a handful of endpoints and servers SCCM is not for you. SCCM would create far more problems than it would solve. If you are a medium to large company spread out over multiple sites SCCM would be the answer to your configuration management problems.
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Score 8 out of 10
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We use SCCM throughout all of our hospital and clinics. We use it primarily for distributing software, remote desktop support, PC imaging and inventory management. The simplest and biggest time saver we employ is the remote session sharing feature. RDP steals the session and remote assistance shares the session. The nursing staff loves this feature because it allows us to jump on their PC with no permissions or software to download. We are fixing problems faster than ever before which is critical in healthcare.
  • Remote assistance. Quickly resolve problems with the customer.
  • Software distribution. Quickly push out software updates, patches and new installs. Also has a self service app that lets users install software with no admin permissions required.
  • Software inventory. It's nice to run a quick report and find out how many copies of Visio we have installed or how many servers have old versions of .Net.
  • Because it's such a huge piece of software it's easy to get lost in all the features and functionality and without proper knowledge you can unintentionally cause serious damage to your network.
  • The reporting could use a little cleaning up and beautification.
  • No web manager, still need an application install.
This is a great product for any environment with Windows machines. We don't use this feature but there are ways to manage Android and Apple devices as well as Mac computers. If you are short staffed, this tool can really replace a few technicians.
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Score 9 out of 10
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Microsoft Systems Center Configuration Manager 2012 R2 is being used for:

  • Deployment of Windows 7 and Windows 10 client desktop and laptop machines
  • Deployment of Windows Server 2012 R2 and 2016 Server machines
  • Management of Windows updates for Windows servers and clients
  • Applying configuration and security baselines and ensuring compliance
  • Reporting and asset management
  • Client and server inventories
  • Software deployment and updates
  • Application deployment and compliance
  • Windows deployment is probably the biggest strength in my opinion. You can build and capture an operating system image, deploy it using as complex a task sequence as you want. The functionality can be combined with that of Microsoft Deployment Toolkit. A deployment can be Zero-Touch all the way to a fully managed sequence.
  • Update management is very good combined with WSUS.
  • The distributed model of SCCM makes it good for ensuring WAN links aren't overutilized.
  • Further work could be done on the software and application deployment side.
  • The ability to view the logs from the same console would make a lot of sense.
Config Manager is particularly well suited to larger environments where the flexibility and power of the product can be fully realised. It is one of those products that would benefit from a dedicated staff resource.

I do not think that Systems Center Configuration Manager is a good product to recommend to smaller business (e.g. those in single offices with fewer than 400 devices).
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Donald Wildeboer profile photo
Score 7 out of 10
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Our corporation uses System Center Configuration Manager to manage our network of servers. It is being used less and less as we move slowly into the cloud and use the tools that are provided for us there. Our Information Technology department manages the service on behalf of the business lines that need the various servers.
  • We can change the settings on all the different servers using Microsoft Systems Management Server built in tools and interface.
  • The reports that the Microsoft Systems Management Server generates simplifies our process of knowing what computers/servers need to be looked at or upgraded next.
  • Microsoft Systems Management Server ties directly into our Active Directory.
  • Microsoft Systems Management Server is an old tool that we needed to upgrade. We specifically use System Center Configuration Manager that supports Windows 10 and it seems to be keeping up with the times. Sometimes the upgrade was not as easy as we would have liked.
  • The support for other OS's such as Linux and phones is not always the greatest.
System Center Configuration Manager (used to be called Microsoft Systems Management Server) is well suited for a group of servers that are all Microsoft and if you are running a fairly Microsoft Server centric organization. It is good for managing the required changes and configuration of many servers from a central location. It is not always the best at non-Microsoft stuffs.
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Andrey Perepelitsyn profile photo
Score 10 out of 10
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Microsoft SCCM is used for applications and configuration management in our company. It has allowed driving updates and PowerShell DSC without any issues for years. It was a huge problem in the past, we had to use several different tools to keep our environment up to date. Now we are able to replace all of these with only Microsoft SCCM.
  • Configuration Management
  • Software dployment automation
  • Updates management
  • Looks a bit complex for new users
We are able to manage configurations, software updates, monitor software usage and deployment of desktop operating systems with a single tool and a single team of admins.
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Felix Adusei Tuffour profile photo
November 27, 2017

MIcrosoft SCCM Review

Score 8 out of 10
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Microsoft SCCM is used to manage all workstations either active or inactive found within the company's network domain. It is also used to deploy other resources to these workstations including, windows update, antivirus, and other applications. SCCM is currently being used actively by the IT department and occasionally used by the IT Auditors. The deployment of an antivirus application and other software applications on client machines was a major challenge as this was done on individual client machines which took a long time. With the introduction of Microsoft SCCM, deployment of such activity is done within a shorter period for batches or all machines at once.
  • Deployment of software applications to workstations within the network domain with ease
  • Monitoring of Client machine performance through dashboard activities
  • Ability to customize reports and also an adequate standard report preview
  • Not easily navigable when no proper training has been undergone
Microsoft SCCM is suitable for deploying all corporate software applications to either individual client machines or to a group of client machines.
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About System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM)

Microsoft System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM) is a system monitoring and management platform that can be deployed as an agent, via the cloud, or on-premises. SCCM can manage systems across OS types (Windows, Mac, Linux), as well as multiple environments, including servers, virtual environments, and mobile devices from a single management console. SCCM supports scaling capabilities, such as future application delivery.

SCCM also provides extended system monitoring services. The platform includes a customizable reporting tool to inform future business software decisions. It also enables endpoint protection from malware and vulnerability identification within the monitored systems and infrastructure.

System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM) Integrations

System Center Configuration Manager (SCCM) Technical Details

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