TrustRadius
https://dudodiprj2sv7.cloudfront.net/product-logos/E6/yx/T5MOCRDQS9B6.JPEGClimb to NativeScript, enjoy the Vue...We are testing NativeScript to see if it will be a good fit for the next version of our app. We have an e-learning education platform focused on mobile. Our current version is built on ionic v1, and we are looking for a better alternative. Our app needs to be offline first, but the courses and content are downloaded from the internet. The app has lots of gamification features. It needs to be much slicker than it is now in the current stack.,True native app. The app uses native components and that is quite noticeable in the overall performance of the app. NativeScript is also awesome in the way we can access the native APIs, so we are never really constrained by the framework. If we need, we can just dive into the native APIs without leaving our environment and language (JS). Cross-platform. Builds for Android and iOS. It deals with the platforms differences very well. Support for Vue.js. Even though it is just a community effort, the NativeScript-Vue plugin is the best alternative to build native Apps with Vue.js. That was a major factor to go with NativeScript.,Web build. It is still hard to share code with a web build. In our case, we want to build a web app with pretty much the same functionality. Other frameworks are stronger at this point. No hot-reload. It still takes a couple of seconds to test an app. React Native does it better... With NS-Vue, the live-reload is even more fragile... Tooling. Overall, NS could use better tooling. Again, RN does it better. Better NS-Vue support. It is improving very well, considering it is a community effort. I see NS organization 100% supporting NS-Vue, but it is still not at the same level as NS-Ng, for instance.,9,(I haven't built an app in production yet.),,Visual Studio IDE, Bitbucket, Google DriveMobile apps delivered by leveraging our existing skillset with NativeScriptWe are using NativeScript on a single mobile project at the moment. It is the framework which supports development of this entire project for our client. In particular, we are using NativeScript with Angular 5, to leverage the current skills of our front-end development team. We also have an internal app to track our knowledge sharing events that we are developing with NativeScript.,NativeScript allows our front-end developers to build actually native mobile apps with the javascript we already know well. It is very quick to get started using NativeScript. We can generally onboard a new developer into the project in just a day or two. The open source community surrounding NativeScript allows our team to find solutions to open issues quickly, as well as give back by fixing some issues ourselves. Work can progress quicker with the plugins other developers have already built.,The frequency of updates can make it hard to stay fixed to a common version. I found that there were so many improvements happening that it was worth bumping versions and adjusting the code at least every 3 months. This added extra development time, which also added stress. The benefit is worth it, but it's important to keep in mind that sometimes even a bugfix version bump will require some code changes. We also found the fractured dependencies hard to keep up with at times. The nativesript-cli, tns-android, tns-ios and nativescript-angular dependencies all have their own release cycles that are close together, but not tied together, and that has downsides when prioritising upgrades during a release cycle. Again, the benefit to upgrading is worth it, but staggered releases do add additional complications. Documentation is good, but could be better. Over the past year, this has been greatly improved, but there is still a delay between the adding or refactoring of features and the updates to the documentation. The plugin ecosystem is open source, which is good, but as with your own project, the authors of these plugins also have to keep up to date with the changes in the repos, and that isn't always done in a timely fashion.,10,We had built this particular app once already, during a 6 month time frame, using Ionic. When we hit the wall, we chose NativeScript, and built the whole app from scratch. We estimated another 6 months, but completed the work in 4 months due to the ease of use. We have found collaboration with our client much easier because of the simplicity of releases and speed of development. Having a tool like NativeScript has allowed us to make competitive quotes for mobile app development contracts, where previously that would have been closed to us due to our lack of native development experience. Being able to build iOS apps without a Swift-code expert has opened those doors for us.,,Adobe Experience ManagerNativeScript - Mobile App Development on SteroidsI work at a fitness based startup. Our app, "AnyGo" is built entirely using NativeScript. I was the one who proposed to the team, to use NativeScript. And today when I look back, I'm glad that I found NativeScript. We were able to launch our app in 6 months, all thanks to NativeScript. I worked on the app, while 3 other developers built the backend on NodeJS.,NativeScript has a large repository of plugins at market.nativescript.org for the times when you want to boost your development speed. NativeScript gives you 100% day zero Native API access. NativeScript doesn't use any webview to render the UI. So you get Native UI, and therefore better performance, when compared to things like ionic or phone gap. With NativeScript you get 4 architectural choices, JavaScript, TypeScript, Angular and Vue. Choose the one you are comfortable with.,Nativescript runs everything on a single thread. i.e., the UI thread. If you want to offload some processing, you have to use web workers. This experience can be improved in the future releases. Currently NativeScript only have hot reload when you change the UI file or Css file. There is no hot reload when you change Js/Ts file, unlike Google's Flutter. This is also something which NativeScript will get in the future releases. In current version of NativeScript, there is no livesync when building with webpack. This feature will be added with NativeScript 4.x. (an RC version for 4.x is already available),10,With NativeScript we were able to goto market sooner than what we expected. We were in market in just 6 months. Customers are happy with our products, in just a month, we reached 200 active users for AnyGo user app, and 17 active partners for AnyGo Partner app. We were able to build all the features that the business requires, using NativeScript. We even built some new plugins for this app. Example nativescript-paytm for payment gateway integration.,React Native and Xamarin,WordPress,No,10,Yes,I had reported a bug in the side drawer once, which caused a jaggered feel when slowly opening the drawer on android. The nativescript ui team let me in on their private repo, and i was able to fix it and submit a PR.NativeScript: Good for mobile performance.NativeScript is the main tool to develop mobile apps for internal and external projects. The main feature is the capacity to develop one source code to address ios and android using the actual experience the dev team has with javascript and angular. Because of their active community, we can reuse our experience and others' in order to speed up every project. Using the extensive library of components already available and the one we have built with the time, we reuse a lot of code saving time.,The fastest transition from prototype to final product Javascript with angular allow us to use the actual experience. No need for native development Native performance, you can exploit the hardware better than hybrid tools,If you come from the nodejs world, you will have to sacrifice some ways to deal with data. For example, we had to sacrifice PouchDB for offline data The final size for Android could be huge compared with hybrid tools or the sameNativeScriptt for iOS Some native development is required in order to exploit all the components Sometimes web development experience is not enough. Even with Angular you need to learn some new concepts. Once dominated, you can rock native mobile apps,8,Positive: shorter delivery time because you don't have to go for the usual native workflow and you have a common base code for all mobile platforms Positive: you can start faster to dominate your hardware. From the very beginning, you will be sure about the performance you will get Negative: you can't have your prototype on a browser, you will require an emulator or a real device Negative: training was required at the beginning because web experience is not enough. Not that you need to become an expert but some native knowledge is required. Also, you need to work on a standard way to deal with database and backend communication,Ionic and Apache Cordova,CouchDB, Couchbase Data Platform, SQL Server Integration Services, Redis,10,3,Control an integrated barcode scanner, or any other integrated component, on a mobile device for fast identification and control Processing complicated business rules keeping a fast user experience in the mobile app Faster UI, you have to go for NativeScript,we moved from pouchdb in hybrid mobile apps to couchbase with nativescript for offline database,We need to do some more work with geolocation Battery efficiency is also another field for us to research,8NativeScript makes cross-platform mobile app development easy, fast, and efficient.We are a consulting company and use NativeScript for apps internally and externally for customers. We chose to use NativeScript as a mobile app development platform because of its native performance, native UI generation, and ease of cross-platform mobile development. Furthermore, we can leverage existing skills on our development teams (Angular, TypeScript, and CSS) to create native mobile apps. This was the first platform we tried that was easy to get started with, and provided the least amount of friction for developing mobile apps.,NativeScript allows you to build on skills many development teams already have: HTML, JavaScript, and CSS. Many developers understand the paradigm of web development where you have HTML, JavaScript, and CSS to define an application's behavior. NativeScript apps are similar. By using a similar paradigm of development, it enables web developers to quickly jump into their first app, write it quickly, and see the results on iOS and Android. The NativeScript Playground sets NativeScript apart from other technologies. The NativeScript Playground is a browser-based environment for developing simple NativeScript apps. It’s a great place to get started learning NativeScript, as you can develop apps without needing to install the various SDKs and tools needed for native iOS and Android development. All you need is your browser, and an Android or iOS mobile device connected to the internet to get started. We use the NativeScript Playground to quickly prototype apps. It's an extremely powerful tool. NativeScript provides abstracted UI and component APIs to access native iOS and Android hardware and UI components. This accelerates development because you can write a singular UI and business logic code for both iOS and Android, thus saving time. At the same time, you have the ability to access native SDK/APIs of the underlying platforms through JavaScript. NativeScript has three flavors of development: NativeScript Core, Angular, and VueJS. NativeScript Core uses XML, JavaScript, and CSS to build native apps. But, if your developers already know Angular or VueJS, then you can build NativeScript apps using Angular/VueJS development paradigms. There are dozens of online resources for getting started, troubleshooting, and staying up-to-date with NativeScript: forums, slack channel, twitter, online docs, NativeScript snacks, NativeScripting, blogs, etc. The community has been very strong, and continues to be a shining star NativeScript.,If users jump directly into NativeScript Angular and are not familiar with NativeScript or Angular yet, it can be difficult to understand where NativeScript ends and Angular begins. This can be confusing.,10,The ROI on using NativeScript for app development for us has been approximately a 75% decrease in the price of mobile app development for our customers. When creating native apps on both Android and iOS platforms, we used to need a significantly greater amount of time. Now, we can bring cross-platform mobile apps to our customers at a reduced cost.,Xamarin,Xamarin
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NativeScript
15 Ratings
Score 8.9 out of 101
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NativeScript Reviews

NativeScript
15 Ratings
Score 8.9 out of 101
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Tiago Alves profile photo
July 24, 2018

Review: "Climb to NativeScript, enjoy the Vue..."

Score 9 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
We are testing NativeScript to see if it will be a good fit for the next version of our app. We have an e-learning education platform focused on mobile. Our current version is built on ionic v1, and we are looking for a better alternative. Our app needs to be offline first, but the courses and content are downloaded from the internet. The app has lots of gamification features. It needs to be much slicker than it is now in the current stack.
  • True native app. The app uses native components and that is quite noticeable in the overall performance of the app. NativeScript is also awesome in the way we can access the native APIs, so we are never really constrained by the framework. If we need, we can just dive into the native APIs without leaving our environment and language (JS).
  • Cross-platform. Builds for Android and iOS. It deals with the platforms differences very well.
  • Support for Vue.js. Even though it is just a community effort, the NativeScript-Vue plugin is the best alternative to build native Apps with Vue.js. That was a major factor to go with NativeScript.
  • Web build. It is still hard to share code with a web build. In our case, we want to build a web app with pretty much the same functionality. Other frameworks are stronger at this point.
  • No hot-reload. It still takes a couple of seconds to test an app. React Native does it better... With NS-Vue, the live-reload is even more fragile...
  • Tooling. Overall, NS could use better tooling. Again, RN does it better.
  • Better NS-Vue support. It is improving very well, considering it is a community effort. I see NS organization 100% supporting NS-Vue, but it is still not at the same level as NS-Ng, for instance.
I would recommend for building native apps for iOS or Android if 1) the developers come from a web dev background; 2) the company can't afford separate teams for Android and iOS; 3) the team wants to use Vue.js.

I would not recommend if the app needs a web version and is simple enough to be a hybrid app.
Read Tiago Alves's full review
Evan Payne profile photo
April 30, 2018

Review: "Mobile apps delivered by leveraging our existing skillset with NativeScript"

Score 10 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
We are using NativeScript on a single mobile project at the moment. It is the framework which supports development of this entire project for our client. In particular, we are using NativeScript with Angular 5, to leverage the current skills of our front-end development team. We also have an internal app to track our knowledge sharing events that we are developing with NativeScript.
  • NativeScript allows our front-end developers to build actually native mobile apps with the javascript we already know well.
  • It is very quick to get started using NativeScript. We can generally onboard a new developer into the project in just a day or two.
  • The open source community surrounding NativeScript allows our team to find solutions to open issues quickly, as well as give back by fixing some issues ourselves. Work can progress quicker with the plugins other developers have already built.
  • The frequency of updates can make it hard to stay fixed to a common version. I found that there were so many improvements happening that it was worth bumping versions and adjusting the code at least every 3 months. This added extra development time, which also added stress. The benefit is worth it, but it's important to keep in mind that sometimes even a bugfix version bump will require some code changes.
  • We also found the fractured dependencies hard to keep up with at times. The nativesript-cli, tns-android, tns-ios and nativescript-angular dependencies all have their own release cycles that are close together, but not tied together, and that has downsides when prioritising upgrades during a release cycle. Again, the benefit to upgrading is worth it, but staggered releases do add additional complications.
  • Documentation is good, but could be better. Over the past year, this has been greatly improved, but there is still a delay between the adding or refactoring of features and the updates to the documentation.
  • The plugin ecosystem is open source, which is good, but as with your own project, the authors of these plugins also have to keep up to date with the changes in the repos, and that isn't always done in a timely fashion.
As with any mobile app, the most important decision to make first is whether you really need a mobile app at all. If you are just building a web app with some user data persistence, then perhaps a progressive web app is all you need. Where NativeScript shines is in building apps that use more than the standard web APIs, and really provide value to your users in how they interact with the device APIs.

Additionally, consider what javascript framework your team is most comfortable using before starting your NativeScript project. There are flavours available for standard JS, Angular, and Vue. Angular is often the best documented, and both JS and Angular are quite stable. NativeScript + Vue is new, and there are still many bugs, but for simple apps, you can accomplish a lot without trouble. The best thing is to choose based on what your team already knows, and this will speed up your development process.
Read Evan Payne's full review
Shiva Prasad K profile photo
April 10, 2018

Review: "NativeScript - Mobile App Development on Steroids"

Score 10 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
I work at a fitness based startup. Our app, "AnyGo" is built entirely using NativeScript. I was the one who proposed to the team, to use NativeScript. And today when I look back, I'm glad that I found NativeScript. We were able to launch our app in 6 months, all thanks to NativeScript. I worked on the app, while 3 other developers built the backend on NodeJS.
  • NativeScript has a large repository of plugins at market.nativescript.org for the times when you want to boost your development speed.
  • NativeScript gives you 100% day zero Native API access.
  • NativeScript doesn't use any webview to render the UI. So you get Native UI, and therefore better performance, when compared to things like ionic or phone gap.
  • With NativeScript you get 4 architectural choices, JavaScript, TypeScript, Angular and Vue. Choose the one you are comfortable with.
  • Nativescript runs everything on a single thread. i.e., the UI thread. If you want to offload some processing, you have to use web workers. This experience can be improved in the future releases.
  • Currently NativeScript only have hot reload when you change the UI file or Css file. There is no hot reload when you change Js/Ts file, unlike Google's Flutter. This is also something which NativeScript will get in the future releases.
  • In current version of NativeScript, there is no livesync when building with webpack. This feature will be added with NativeScript 4.x. (an RC version for 4.x is already available)
When you want to target Web and Mobile (iOS + Android), using a single code base. Then you can use NativeScript Angular or NativeScript Vue.

If your app is going to do a lot of heavy lifting in the background, requires building widgets that can be added on homescreen, or simply is going to be a service, which doesn't require UI, then NativeScript is not an ideal fit for that project.
Read Shiva Prasad K's full review
victor pease solano profile photo
February 16, 2018

Review: "NativeScript: Good for mobile performance."

Score 8 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
NativeScript is the main tool to develop mobile apps for internal and external projects. The main feature is the capacity to develop one source code to address ios and android using the actual experience the dev team has with javascript and angular. Because of their active community, we can reuse our experience and others' in order to speed up every project. Using the extensive library of components already available and the one we have built with the time, we reuse a lot of code saving time.
  • The fastest transition from prototype to final product
  • Javascript with angular allow us to use the actual experience. No need for native development
  • Native performance, you can exploit the hardware better than hybrid tools
  • If you come from the nodejs world, you will have to sacrifice some ways to deal with data. For example, we had to sacrifice PouchDB for offline data
  • The final size for Android could be huge compared with hybrid tools or the sameNativeScriptt for iOS
  • Some native development is required in order to exploit all the components
  • Sometimes web development experience is not enough. Even with Angular you need to learn some new concepts. Once dominated, you can rock native mobile apps
When you need to exploit all the hardware capabilities and the communication with the backend is critical, you better go with NativeScript. If your main feature is offline access then you better sacrifice some performance going with something hybrid like Ionic. The criteria to choose better is if the final application could work more like a web page, or you already have a web app and you want almost the same features in your mobile app, you will go for a hybrid, but if you want to go from scratch thinking on a completely mobile experience with performance where the connectivity is not an issue you will go for NativeScript.
Read victor pease solano's full review
Mike Branstein profile photo
April 10, 2018

Review: "NativeScript makes cross-platform mobile app development easy, fast, and efficient."

Score 10 out of 10
Vetted Review
Reseller
Review Source
We are a consulting company and use NativeScript for apps internally and externally for customers. We chose to use NativeScript as a mobile app development platform because of its native performance, native UI generation, and ease of cross-platform mobile development. Furthermore, we can leverage existing skills on our development teams (Angular, TypeScript, and CSS) to create native mobile apps. This was the first platform we tried that was easy to get started with, and provided the least amount of friction for developing mobile apps.
  • NativeScript allows you to build on skills many development teams already have: HTML, JavaScript, and CSS. Many developers understand the paradigm of web development where you have HTML, JavaScript, and CSS to define an application's behavior. NativeScript apps are similar. By using a similar paradigm of development, it enables web developers to quickly jump into their first app, write it quickly, and see the results on iOS and Android.
  • The NativeScript Playground sets NativeScript apart from other technologies. The NativeScript Playground is a browser-based environment for developing simple NativeScript apps. It’s a great place to get started learning NativeScript, as you can develop apps without needing to install the various SDKs and tools needed for native iOS and Android development. All you need is your browser, and an Android or iOS mobile device connected to the internet to get started. We use the NativeScript Playground to quickly prototype apps. It's an extremely powerful tool.
  • NativeScript provides abstracted UI and component APIs to access native iOS and Android hardware and UI components. This accelerates development because you can write a singular UI and business logic code for both iOS and Android, thus saving time. At the same time, you have the ability to access native SDK/APIs of the underlying platforms through JavaScript.
  • NativeScript has three flavors of development: NativeScript Core, Angular, and VueJS. NativeScript Core uses XML, JavaScript, and CSS to build native apps. But, if your developers already know Angular or VueJS, then you can build NativeScript apps using Angular/VueJS development paradigms.
  • There are dozens of online resources for getting started, troubleshooting, and staying up-to-date with NativeScript: forums, slack channel, twitter, online docs, NativeScript snacks, NativeScripting, blogs, etc. The community has been very strong, and continues to be a shining star NativeScript.
  • If users jump directly into NativeScript Angular and are not familiar with NativeScript or Angular yet, it can be difficult to understand where NativeScript ends and Angular begins. This can be confusing.
NativeScript is great for line of business apps, quick prototypes, and production apps. NativeScript isn't designed for heavy 3D graphics and gaming apps, as other platforms like Unity do this well and are highly optimized.
Read Mike Branstein's full review
Nic Raboy profile photo
April 10, 2018

User Review: "Mobile Performance with NativeScript"

Score 10 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
As a very small development shop, NativeScript allows us to create cross platform "native" mobile applications for Android and iOS while using a single web skillset rather than needing to learn Java, Objective-C, or Swift. NativeScript with Angular is being used and the single skillset for development helps to reduce the cost and barrier to entry for mobile application development.
  • Native mobile applications built with NativeScript that do not rely on a WebView component result in extremely fast performance and a happy user experience.
  • Being able to use JavaScript, TypeScript, Angular, or Vue.js gives the developers options when it comes to development.
  • NativeScript has a lot of plugins for features such as charting that would otherwise be very complicated to implement in iOS and Android if not using NativeScript.
  • The documentation could be improved to be more consistent across all supported frameworks like Angular, Vue.js, and Core.
  • The application binary size could be reduced to be more in line with pure native and other similar frameworks.
NativeScript is well suited for most mobile development. Being that it supports Android and iOS with either Angular, Vue.js, and TypeScript or JavaScript, it covers a lot of developer possibilities. If the developer has prior experience with React, it may be more logical to explore React Native to meet an already existing skill set. Likewise if the developer has prior C# experience it might be better to choose Xamarin.
Read Nic Raboy's full review
Brad Martin profile photo
April 10, 2018

NativeScript Review: "The Brad Martin Perspective"

Score 9 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
At nStudio, LLC. we use it as our suggested application framework to clients for developing iOS and Android applications that integrate with a web app so we can utilize the code-sharing strategy of a web framework like Angular or VueJS and significantly reduce the amount of code to write for a web app and mobile app.
  • The CLI for development workflow is very great. The livesync option for fast dev iteration works really well.
  • Styling native apps is not easy but NativeScript provides an abstraction of CSS to easily style native apps similar to how web apps are styled.
  • The one area we are wanting to see is Hot Module Reloading, this is supposedly in the works but we anxiously awaiting it to be implemented. While the livesync is great it sometimes can be a hinderance to the work flow when the app has to restart for code changes, where HMR would allow instant code changes without an app restart.
  • The layouts could use some better "guessing" on what the developers are trying to do if they are not sure of how to do things, the learning curve for layouts can be rough for new devs.
If you're going to want a mobile app and a web app then NativeScript is the perfect solution, especially if your developers enjoy Angular or VueJS javascript frameworks.

If you're going to do game development or if learning native mobile paradigms are an issue then NativeScript is not the best option and using a web only approach would be best.
Read Brad Martin's full review
Dave Coffin profile photo
February 15, 2018

Review: "NativeScript - Cross platform app development for n00bs"

Score 10 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
I use NativeScript as the primary platform for developing native mobile applications. We have a native mobile app called Daily Nanny (dailynannyapp.com) used by thousands of parents and nannies, and the Android and iOS applications were built using NativeScript. I had no experience building native mobile applications, but I was able to apply my expertise in JavaScript, HTML, and CSS to build and release a cross-platform application in a fraction of the time it would have taken to build two different apps on two different platforms.
  • Native Performance: NativeScript apps are entirely Native. They are not hybrid apps, each UI element is from each platform's UI library, so the performance is that of an application developed in Java for Android or Xcode/Swift for iOS.
  • Framework Support: The NativeScript team and community have put a lot of emphasis on being able to use javascript frameworks within NativeScript. There is an angular implementation that lets you develop using Angular 2 and even share code among web applications.
  • Plugins: The NativeScript community is a vibrant contributor to the plugin marketplace. You can find a plugin for almost any functionality.
  • Access to Native APIs: With the way the NativeScript is built, you have access to all Native APIs as soon as they are available on the device, NativeScript does not need to expose access. So as soon as a new feature comes out in the OS, you can utilize it in your NativeScript app.
  • Documentation Clarity: Due to the many different ways you can write NativeScript apps (Vanilla JS, TypeScript, Angular, Vue, Webpack), the documentation is not always accurate.
  • If your team has accomplished web developers but no Native developers, NativeScript will allow them to use their current skills to create Native Mobile Apps.
  • If you need device-specific functionality, it's easy to tap into Native APIs.
  • If you have web apps built using Angular 2, you can create a NativeScript application and even share some code.
Read Dave Coffin's full review
No photo available
April 10, 2018

NativeScript Review: "The best possible way to develop your next Android and iOS application."

Score 10 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
I currently use NativeScript for multiple applications that are in various stages of development. In my opinion, NativeScript is one of the best if not the best frameworks to write Android and iOS Applications. With NativeScript I'm able to reuse concepts and knowledge of existing frameworks such as Angular or Vue.js to build Applications that actually use native elements and have native performance.

A common problem with multi-platform development is eventually you will encounter a situation where the framework doesn't have a feature you need to complete a task. This is true for all multi-platform frameworks, including NativeScript. However, with NativeScript you have access to the native API for iOS and Android. This allows us as developers to solve our own problems and not lose momentum whereas other frameworks we would be at the mercy of plugin developers or have to write Java and/or Objective C code ourselves to sometimes solve very small but frustrating tasks.
  • Code Reuse - With NativeScript you can share code between Native and Mobile Applications.
  • Native APIs - being able to access Native APIs allows us as developers to write applications in one language instead of jumping between the Java/Objective C apps are written in TypeScript or JavaScript.
  • Ease of use - NativeScript SideKick makes working with NativeScript a breeze and allows us to get an application set up for development in a few minutes.
  • Occasionally there are inconsistencies when it comes to styling and layouts between Android and iOS, this can be frustrating especially in the beginning because you are usually working with one platform and then switch to the other only to have layout issues.
  • New releases sometimes are buggy.
NativeScript is well suited for most smartphone applications, I'm using it for a motion sensing application, a Roku remote and a streaming music service application, however, it is not for game development.
Read this authenticated review
No photo available
April 10, 2018

Review: "NativeScript, the fast way to build robust mobile applications"

Score 10 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
Our organization uses NativeScript to build different mobile applications for clients with different needs. NativeScript has been a great fit for us for the last couple of years, as it allows us to move forward quickly delivering high-quality applications in a lot less time than it would take if we had to develop two separate codebases for the two main platforms.
  • Easy to use abstactions for common elements such as action bars, tab views etc.
  • Allows accessing native APIs within JavaScript, so if anything is missing from the core framework, we don't have to wait for an update, we can just implement it straight away.
  • The choices when choosing a framework (or no framework) to be used. NativeScript works with plain JavaScript, plain Typescript, Angular and a recent additon of VueJs.
  • There is no real hot module replacement, where changes made to the source code reflect on the device instantly.
  • There is a slight overhead by having to run a JavaScript VM, so if performance is really critical NativeScript might not be the right choice. Worth noting that in most cases the performance is very comparable to truly native applications.
  • There are no ready-made UI collections, so applications have to be built using the default UI elements, and then styled manually.
If the goal is to ease future maintenance by not having to develop two separate codebases for the two main platforms then NativeScript might be a great fit. NativeScript is not a good fit for games because of the added overhead of having to run a JavaScript VM that proxies calls to the underlying native layer.
Read this authenticated review

About NativeScript

NativeScript is an open source framework that allows you to create native iOS and Android apps, with one codebase, using ​the web skills you already have (JavaScript and CSS) and ​the libraries you already love​.
Categories:  App Development

NativeScript Features

Has featureReuse web skills (JavaScript, CSS) to create truly native mobile apps for iOS and Android
Has featureDeep integration with popular JavaScript frameworks like Angular or Vue to minimize learning curve
Has featureExtensive code sharing between mobile platforms (including UI) and web apps (when used with Angular)
Has featureDeliver high-quality mobile apps to multiple platforms faster, using web developers you already have

NativeScript Screenshots

NativeScript Integrations

Angular, Vue, Visual Studio Code, Visual Studio 2015/2017 Coming Soon

NativeScript Competitors

Xamarin, ReactNative, Ionic/Hybrid

Pricing

Has featureFree Trial Available?Yes
Has featureFree or Freemium Version Available?Yes
Does not have featurePremium Consulting/Integration Services Available?No
Entry-level set up fee?No

The NativeScript framework and CLI are completely free and open source. NativeScript Sidekick is a free download to improve developer productivity with optional paid tiers for power users.

NativeScript Support Options

 Free VersionPaid Version
Forum/Community
FAQ/Knowledgebase
Social Media
Video Tutorials / Webinar
Phone
Email

NativeScript Technical Details

Deployment Types:On-premise
Operating Systems: Windows, Linux, Mac
Mobile Application:Apple iOS, Android