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Microsoft's System Center Operations Manager (SCOM) is a monitoring and application performance management option.Great monitoring extension for your System CenterSystem Center Operations Manager is used across IT departments of our organization. It provides monitoring capabilities for our on-premise infrastructure and part of Azure-based VMs across the VPN gateway. SCOM helps us to monitor our hosts 24*7 and address issues immediately when an alert is triggered. Flexible configuration of SCOM allows us to set different threshold for alert in prod and non-prod environments,Windows Server monitoring SQL Server monitoring Integration with Operation Management Suite,Linux monitoring could be better Possibility for agentless monitoring could be helpful in some cases, but it has a lot of limitation in SCOM,7,Implementation of SCOM allows one to reduce incident response time, helping to avoid bigger problems SCOM provides analytical functions to predict possible failures and resolve issues before these become critical SCOM integrates with other System Center products and allows engineers to continue working on familiar environment, just extending its functionality,HP SiteScope and Datadog,Slack, Microsoft Azure, WebEx MeetingsSCOM is the Bomb!Our company just finished up a proof of concept of Systems Center Operations Manager. We are going to adopt SCOM for monitoring the health of our Team Foundation Servers and SQL Servers. We decided to take a look at SCOM due to some issues we had with our TFS Servers which resulted in severe latency throughout the system. We realized that we needed to get a better handle on monitoring the system health. Our goal is to have a holistic view of the system, to be able to predict and correct issues before they happen, or at the early warning signs of degradation. We need to be able to capture various performance metrics and retain a history to establish the baselines of what healthy looks like and understand when and why the system trends away from that healthy baseline. Keeping our development shops running at their top pace is vital to our business. TFS and SQL are the lifeblood of our SDLC, therefore the development teams efficiency rely on these systems. Long term goal is to roll out SCOM to other areas of the organization.,The Health Explorer within SCOM is one of the more impressive features. How a system framework is monitored and when something goes wrong, it rolls up to the top level object and alerts the user. If there is a critical issue or warning, it rolls up to the system as a whole and the system will appear critical. You can use the Health Explorer to drill down and find the particular monitor that is in the critical state. From there you can see the details and where the problem lies. Whether it's from the event logs on the server or a performance threshold that has been triggered, you get all the information you need to troubleshoot quickly. When the issue is fixed, the overall system shows as healthy, again. When troubleshooting issues found through SCOM, you can add details to your company knowledge base within SCOM and tie that knowledge article to a particular monitor, which in turn adds the knowledge article to the alert that monitor eventually triggers. So, not only do you get some great, built-in troubleshooting information from the product you're monitoring, you also can build an additional company KB and that information will be right in the alert the next time that particular issue occurs. This makes troubleshooting infinitely quicker. The Management Packs that are applied to SCOM are what got us interested in using SCOM in the first place. We have a TFS Management Pack and a SQL Server management pack that we use. You can build custom Management Packs from scratch with SCOM, but having the framework in place for the systems we want to monitor out of the box, is a huge plus! Any customizations we want to do can be done on top of the Management Pack designed for the target system.,One of the biggest drawbacks to SCOM is the sheer scope and complexity of the system. This can be a pro and a con. The system is very customizable, what you put into it is what you'll get out of it. That said, the learning curve is fairly steep. An organization needs to be committed to putting time and resources into SCOM to get the most out of it. I've heard stories from colleagues of several different companies that invested in SCOM and then abandoned it due to the excessive time and care required. SCOM is expensive. Not only is the enterprise licensing costly, SCOM requires it's own servers, operational and warehouse databases to be maintained. The OOB SCOM reports are a bit clunky and feel outdated.,8,Since we are at the tail end of our POC, we have no immediate ROI to report. That said, during the POC, we immediately identified several issues within TFS that we immediately addressed and will potentially save us hours of lost time and troubleshooting.,Nagios,Team Foundation Server, Microsoft Visual Studio Team System, Microsoft Office 2016System Center Operation Manager in a Medium Sized Company, a reviewThis is a System Center Operations Manager (SCOM) 2012 deployment used to monitor and support a four nodes Hyper-V cluster (Windows Server 2012 R2). The company uses it in conjunction with other System Center products, like Data Protection Manager and Virtual Machine Manager. All the production servers are virtual and running on the above solution (last count was over 100 virtual machines). SCOM is not in use for the management of workstations or clients.,SCOM does excellent work in monitoring Microsoft Operating Systems and back-end solutions like Exchange and SQL Server. The information gathered is useful and the (free) management packs add in-depth counters and monitoring data. Agent deployment and updating, that with other solutions can be a complex task, is usually easy to perform. Also for endpoints that are in an external network or DMZ, a certificate based approach allows to get the result without requiring too high of a configuration effort. The product is also able to manage non-Microsoft platform and devices. The list of Management Packs is really long and covers many of the main players in the IT industry.,SCOM requires a lot of fine tuning to be really usable, especially from an alerting point of view. The default thresholds are meant to be good for a generic scenario, but each IT department has to spend time in calibrating them on their specific needs. The most recent rollup updates have improved SCOM from all the points of view. Using it some time ago was not easy, due to a series of limitations and flaws (often I have seen agents going in "unknown state" with no motivation, just for example). I think that some companies have now a negative perception of Operations Manager due to this not so brilliant past. From a security point of view, SCOM requires some specific configurations. The required rules and permissions on firewalls, specifically, are something that usually requires some conversation and clarification with the network and security managers.,8,First point: it depends if you have to pay for the System Center suite or it is already part of your licensing (for example, some versions of Windows Server 2012 R2 Datacenter had a System Center license included). If you have it already, the overall cost is lower. Second point: number of people in the IT department and IT budget. The "Proof of Concept" and roll-out phases of an SCOM deployment require some effort, especially for customization. A small IT department with no budget for consultancy could achieve a limited benefit from this solution having no time to tailor it to the specific needs. Third point: number of Microsoft products deployed in comparison to other vendors. A company that is using a huge number of different platforms, with Microsoft just being one of them, could prefer other monitoring solution.,,Windows Server, Skype for Business, Microsoft SQL ServerFor Large Windows Enterprises with Resources there is No Better Asset Management ToolSCOM is essential in managing our 15,000+ desktops and 3,000+ laptops across our enterprise in 17 countries and over 30 locations. We do asset management, Windows and security updates patching as well as software deployment. Recently in the last two years we have been working on utilizing SCOM to also manage our enterprise servers across four data centers and have been migrating off WSUS to deploy updates and patches.,SCOM can manage Windows OS systems from desktops to servers very well. SCOM is platform agnostic in that we manage physical and virtual machines with no differentiation. SCOM can quickly deploy emergency security patches and the best part is it can provide detailed results of success and failure rate of patch deployment.,SCOM to increase performance and more robust high availability. Simplify dependent components (supporting servers and database). Better management interface and more robust roles setup for multiple IT support groups with detailed auditing enabled.,8,We wanted to make sure that updates and patches deployed are actually successfully installed on devices and other tools cannot match SCOM for detailed feedback on deployment status. We can now confidently provide management and security teams on successful update of security patches with high accuracy. Deployment complexity took over a year to fully implement all necessary features with help of consultants and in house teams. Wish it was simpler.,,OnBase by Hyland, AspenOne Supply Chain Management, Oracle Primavera Portfolio ManagementSCOM 2012 Review from a sort of smart guy.We use SCOM to monitor our servers and network devices. It is used mainly by the technical IT staff. Other than the hardware, we also use it to monitor services and certain event log messages. We also use SA Vision Live Maps to visually represent our environment. There are several flat screen TVs in strategic areas (including our 24 hour help desk), that display the SA Vision Live Maps view. When a monitor goes red it is reflected in the Live Maps view and the appropriate team is notified. For the network monitoring component we use Jalasoft Xian Network Manager which also works in conjunction with SCOM. We do not use the native SCOM network monitoring feature as Jalasoft does a better job of monitoring the network objects.,SCOM in conjunction with SA Vision Live Maps makes it easy to create a visual dashboard of you environment. You can create hierarchical maps to represent your entire environment to a geographical scale and drill down when a problem arises. If you have an application that can send messages to an event log, you can easily create monitors and rules for specific errors that you care about and send those alerts as e-mails. SCOM is both agent and agentless so you have the option to get better monitoring by installing an agent. We have had few issues of a SCOM agent on a server.,You need to stay on top of SCOM because you can easily bog down your performance if you are not constantly addressing problematic alerts, or a bad management pack. Network monitoring is there but compared to other SCOM plugins like Jalasoft, the Microsoft implementation is lacking. Jalasoft seems more straight forward and easier to implement. When your SCOM environment slows down you will need to open a Microsoft call and depending who you get, it can take weeks to address an issue. We currently have some issues that have been open for more than a month. SNMP monitoring is also not straight forward and you can't import MIBs.,7,In the beginning it was hard to get all the admins to get on board with our SCOM procedures because there were a lot of false positives and needless pages for being made. However several years later there are fewer skeptics and each team find some value in some of the features. SCOM is an expensive solution the more servers you have.,,DataCore Hyper-converged Virtual SAN, CommVault
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System Center Operations Manager
60 Ratings
Score 7.5 out of 101
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SCOM Reviews

SCOM
60 Ratings
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Score 7.5 out of 101
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Andrey Perepelitsyn profile photo
February 01, 2018

SCOM Review: "Great monitoring extension for your System Center"

Score 7 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
System Center Operations Manager is used across IT departments of our organization. It provides monitoring capabilities for our on-premise infrastructure and part of Azure-based VMs across the VPN gateway. SCOM helps us to monitor our hosts 24*7 and address issues immediately when an alert is triggered. Flexible configuration of SCOM allows us to set different threshold for alert in prod and non-prod environments
  • Windows Server monitoring
  • SQL Server monitoring
  • Integration with Operation Management Suite
  • Linux monitoring could be better
  • Possibility for agentless monitoring could be helpful in some cases, but it has a lot of limitation in SCOM
Works best with on-premise Windows Server monitoring, it is able to capture all possible windows logs and performance counters to track and analyze performance and send alerts when metrics are exceeding thresholds. Even after an incident was resolved you can see the condition of the server before it to analyze what caused the incident and how to avoid it in future.
Read Andrey Perepelitsyn's full review
No photo available
January 18, 2018

User Review: "SCOM is the Bomb!"

Score 8 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
Our company just finished up a proof of concept of Systems Center Operations Manager. We are going to adopt SCOM for monitoring the health of our Team Foundation Servers and SQL Servers. We decided to take a look at SCOM due to some issues we had with our TFS Servers which resulted in severe latency throughout the system. We realized that we needed to get a better handle on monitoring the system health. Our goal is to have a holistic view of the system, to be able to predict and correct issues before they happen, or at the early warning signs of degradation. We need to be able to capture various performance metrics and retain a history to establish the baselines of what healthy looks like and understand when and why the system trends away from that healthy baseline. Keeping our development shops running at their top pace is vital to our business. TFS and SQL are the lifeblood of our SDLC, therefore the development teams efficiency rely on these systems. Long term goal is to roll out SCOM to other areas of the organization.
  • The Health Explorer within SCOM is one of the more impressive features. How a system framework is monitored and when something goes wrong, it rolls up to the top level object and alerts the user. If there is a critical issue or warning, it rolls up to the system as a whole and the system will appear critical. You can use the Health Explorer to drill down and find the particular monitor that is in the critical state. From there you can see the details and where the problem lies. Whether it's from the event logs on the server or a performance threshold that has been triggered, you get all the information you need to troubleshoot quickly. When the issue is fixed, the overall system shows as healthy, again.
  • When troubleshooting issues found through SCOM, you can add details to your company knowledge base within SCOM and tie that knowledge article to a particular monitor, which in turn adds the knowledge article to the alert that monitor eventually triggers. So, not only do you get some great, built-in troubleshooting information from the product you're monitoring, you also can build an additional company KB and that information will be right in the alert the next time that particular issue occurs. This makes troubleshooting infinitely quicker.
  • The Management Packs that are applied to SCOM are what got us interested in using SCOM in the first place. We have a TFS Management Pack and a SQL Server management pack that we use. You can build custom Management Packs from scratch with SCOM, but having the framework in place for the systems we want to monitor out of the box, is a huge plus! Any customizations we want to do can be done on top of the Management Pack designed for the target system.
  • One of the biggest drawbacks to SCOM is the sheer scope and complexity of the system. This can be a pro and a con. The system is very customizable, what you put into it is what you'll get out of it. That said, the learning curve is fairly steep. An organization needs to be committed to putting time and resources into SCOM to get the most out of it. I've heard stories from colleagues of several different companies that invested in SCOM and then abandoned it due to the excessive time and care required.
  • SCOM is expensive. Not only is the enterprise licensing costly, SCOM requires it's own servers, operational and warehouse databases to be maintained.
  • The OOB SCOM reports are a bit clunky and feel outdated.
SCOM is best suited for mid-sized to large organizations to monitor and report on server health for many systems. SCOM is probably not suited for smaller organizations as the cost will outweigh the benefit. Companies that adopt SCOM will want to assure that a systems administrator has time budgeted to plan, roll-out and maintain SCOM for the organization. If the admin doesn't have experience with SCOM, invest in training.
Read this authenticated review
Fabrizio Volpe profile photo
August 18, 2017

SCOM: "System Center Operation Manager in a Medium Sized Company, a review"

Score 8 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
This is a System Center Operations Manager (SCOM) 2012 deployment used to monitor and support a four nodes Hyper-V cluster (Windows Server 2012 R2). The company uses it in conjunction with other System Center products, like Data Protection Manager and Virtual Machine Manager. All the production servers are virtual and running on the above solution (last count was over 100 virtual machines). SCOM is not in use for the management of workstations or clients.
  • SCOM does excellent work in monitoring Microsoft Operating Systems and back-end solutions like Exchange and SQL Server. The information gathered is useful and the (free) management packs add in-depth counters and monitoring data.
  • Agent deployment and updating, that with other solutions can be a complex task, is usually easy to perform. Also for endpoints that are in an external network or DMZ, a certificate based approach allows to get the result without requiring too high of a configuration effort.
  • The product is also able to manage non-Microsoft platform and devices. The list of Management Packs is really long and covers many of the main players in the IT industry.
  • SCOM requires a lot of fine tuning to be really usable, especially from an alerting point of view. The default thresholds are meant to be good for a generic scenario, but each IT department has to spend time in calibrating them on their specific needs.
  • The most recent rollup updates have improved SCOM from all the points of view. Using it some time ago was not easy, due to a series of limitations and flaws (often I have seen agents going in "unknown state" with no motivation, just for example). I think that some companies have now a negative perception of Operations Manager due to this not so brilliant past.
  • From a security point of view, SCOM requires some specific configurations. The required rules and permissions on firewalls, specifically, are something that usually requires some conversation and clarification with the network and security managers.
The effort and infrastructure required for SCOM make it a product that is a good fit for medium or large companies. There is also a cost to be considered, especially if the System Center Suite is not part of the licensing that the company has already. However, any company with a good number of Microsoft servers and services (I would say at least 50 servers, just to give an idea) will see the benefits of a product that is able to easily gather information and monitoring data. My considerations are based on an on-premises data center, so the above could not apply to people using SCOM also for Cloud deployments monitoring.
Read Fabrizio Volpe's full review
No photo available
December 01, 2017

SCOM Review: "For Large Windows Enterprises with Resources there is No Better Asset Management Tool"

Score 8 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
SCOM is essential in managing our 15,000+ desktops and 3,000+ laptops across our enterprise in 17 countries and over 30 locations. We do asset management, Windows and security updates patching as well as software deployment. Recently in the last two years we have been working on utilizing SCOM to also manage our enterprise servers across four data centers and have been migrating off WSUS to deploy updates and patches.
  • SCOM can manage Windows OS systems from desktops to servers very well.
  • SCOM is platform agnostic in that we manage physical and virtual machines with no differentiation.
  • SCOM can quickly deploy emergency security patches and the best part is it can provide detailed results of success and failure rate of patch deployment.
  • SCOM to increase performance and more robust high availability.
  • Simplify dependent components (supporting servers and database).
  • Better management interface and more robust roles setup for multiple IT support groups with detailed auditing enabled.
Great for large mid to large enterprises but it's a big initiate to take on and if I am managing 5000 or fewer devices with SCOM I cannot recommend it due to cost and complexity of implementation. Perhaps there's a cloud-based SCOM coming soon for smaller enterprises and that may lower the barrier of entry for smaller organizations that are still mostly Windows OS dependent to finally manage their devices properly as meant to be without other third-party tools.
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Rogee Fedeleon profile photo
February 26, 2016

"SCOM 2012 Review from a sort of smart guy."

Score 7 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source

We use SCOM to monitor our servers and network devices. It is used mainly by the technical IT staff. Other than the hardware, we also use it to monitor services and certain event log messages. We also use SA Vision Live Maps to visually represent our environment. There are several flat screen TVs in strategic areas (including our 24 hour help desk), that display the SA Vision Live Maps view. When a monitor goes red it is reflected in the Live Maps view and the appropriate team is notified.

For the network monitoring component we use Jalasoft Xian Network Manager which also works in conjunction with SCOM. We do not use the native SCOM network monitoring feature as Jalasoft does a better job of monitoring the network objects.

  • SCOM in conjunction with SA Vision Live Maps makes it easy to create a visual dashboard of you environment. You can create hierarchical maps to represent your entire environment to a geographical scale and drill down when a problem arises.
  • If you have an application that can send messages to an event log, you can easily create monitors and rules for specific errors that you care about and send those alerts as e-mails.
  • SCOM is both agent and agentless so you have the option to get better monitoring by installing an agent. We have had few issues of a SCOM agent on a server.
  • You need to stay on top of SCOM because you can easily bog down your performance if you are not constantly addressing problematic alerts, or a bad management pack.
  • Network monitoring is there but compared to other SCOM plugins like Jalasoft, the Microsoft implementation is lacking. Jalasoft seems more straight forward and easier to implement.
  • When your SCOM environment slows down you will need to open a Microsoft call and depending who you get, it can take weeks to address an issue. We currently have some issues that have been open for more than a month.
  • SNMP monitoring is also not straight forward and you can't import MIBs.
It is definitely well suited if you want to monitor Microsoft based systems and software. You will also want whoever your main SCOM admin is to be a good logical thinker, have familiarity with running SQL queries, and be almost anal on wanting to keep a system running optimally.

While SCOM can monitor Linux OS, I would say if most of your devices are Linux and Network devices that you should look at something else.
Read Rogee Fedeleon's full review
Brody Kilpatrick profile photo
October 28, 2015

SCOM Review: "Operations Manager from a System Center Expert"

Score 9 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
System Center Operations Manager is being used to monitor our Microsoft Windows, VMWare, HP hardware, and critical application environments. We have been successful in monitoring in-house applications as well products we have purchased through native, purchased, free (community) and in-house developed management packs. It is being used primarily by our IT organization, but we also have some people outside of IT that use System Center Operations Manager. We have used System Center Operations Manager to increase the stability and reliability of our IT organization as well as automatically correct issues it discovers.
  • Windows OS Monitoring - Out of the box, System Center Operations Manager does a wonderful job of monitoring Windows Operating System health, performance and configuration. It provides detailed reports and the data required to quickly make technical decisions.
  • Community - The System Center Operations Manager community is huge. It is rare that we need to purchase a third party application to use along with System Center Operations Manager. Because System Center Operations Manager has been around for quite a while, many experts in the community are available for writing and sharing advanced management packs and monitoring strategies.
  • Flexibility - System Center Operations Manager provides the flexibility to perform any monitoring that has ever been requested of me. While the product is simple in its native form, it can be expanded with the authoring tool, add-ons, and visual studio authoring extensions.
  • Network Monitoring - System Center Operations Manager provides network monitoring, but it is relatively new, clunky, and feature-poor. It is improving, but if you need to do advanced network monitoring, use a dedicated product.
  • Consoles - System Center Operations Manager has two consoles - the web console and the desktop console. Both can be slow at times, even with a healthy back end. It has never been a huge problem, but when you are moving quickly, you can sometimes be caught up waiting a couple of seconds here or there.
Is your environment primarily Windows, or it is another OS? System Center Operations Manager is not the right tool unless the environment is primarily Windows. Are you monitoring at least 100 devices? If not, System Center Operations Manager might be overpriced. Do you need deep level monitoring of technologies such as Exchange, SQL Server, Active Directory/DNS/DHCP? System Center Operations Manager handles them very well. Do you need the ability to create extensive or custom monitoring of in-house applications? System Center Operations Manager will provide the flexibility.
Read Brody Kilpatrick's full review
Roman Yuferev profile photo
October 30, 2015

SCOM Review: "Best centralized monitoring platform!"

Score 8 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
In fact, we are developing custom monitoring solutions on the System Center Operations Manager(SCOM) platform for our customers and, of course, we are using it to monitor our IT infrastructure. So my feedback will include both parts. We have many cases, when SCOM helps our enterprise customers to address the following problems:
1. Address Availability and Performance issues of the hardware and software components of IT infrastructure (e.g. Exchange, SharePoint, SQL Server)
2. Monitor custom services, created inside organization.
3. Detect IT services outages and quickly resolve it
SCOM is not just a tool - it's IT monitoring platform with great extensibility options and it can solve much more problems with right customization.
  • Microsoft workloads monitoring: SQL Server, Windows Server, Exchange and other Microsoft products.
  • Data Visualization. With the custom dashboard capabilities, available in SCOM 2012 we can create advanced UI in SCOM console. One of the best examples there - SQL Server Monitoring Management Pack.
  • Extensibility. This is very important feature, which allows end-users to add their custom monitoring scenarios using Powershell.
  • Network monitoring. That is definitely not the strongest area of SCOM. Major competitors already doing it much better
  • Performance and resource usage. First-time users can be very confused by the latency and resource consumption by console and server components
  • New features. Last years SCOM couldn't demonstrate enough new features in new releases. I wish it has more.
Of course SCOM works better, if your IT infrastructure is mostly Windows-based. As I mentioned before, most popular Microsoft workloads, such as Windows Server, SQL Server, Exchange are perfectly covered. At the same time, you have to check, what part of your IT components has SCOM Management Packs out of the box. For example, HP and Dell provide SCOM integration for their servers.
Read Roman Yuferev's full review
Murad Akram profile photo
October 30, 2015

User Review: "SCOM or not to SCOM"

Score 9 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
We are using System Center Operations Manager 2012 R2 to manage and monitor our Windows and Linux platform as well as using SCOM APM to monitor multiple .NET and JAVA applications.
  • Monitoring availability and performance of Windows Platform.
  • Ability to set up alerts based on various and multiple conditions and situations.
  • Performance trending and reporting.
  • Its ability to identify what's happening within our .NET code via APM module.
  • Upgrading and patching SCOM is always complicated and challenging, it can be improved.
  • Console (thick client and web) performance need some attention, many of my SCOM users still won't log in and use the product because they hate the way it performs.
  • 2012 R2 version is still lacking basic features like scheduled maintenance mode, although PowerShell scripts and third party tools can be used to achieve this, but I think any monitoring tool should have this ability out of the box.
It's a very good tool to manage/monitor everything Microsoft, but lacking a lot to manage/monitor other products e.g. Linux/Unix/JAVA/NETWORK gears/Hardware etc.
Read Murad Akram's full review
No photo available
February 25, 2016

Review: "SCOM - Bigger than the sum of its parts"

Score 7 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
We currently use SCOM within the IT Department to provide Event Alert Management across our whole server estate. Each sub team will have there own alerts and for me particularly as the DBA team we have the SQL packs installed to provide additional information about the Instances on servers. From my point of view we use this system primarily for Alert Management. We have it set up to send an email warnings when disk space is low and if an instance is offline and also for performance metrics that might need further investigation (such as high wait times).
  • Centralised Reporting of Alerts/Warnings/Performance metrics - good when trying to provide an enterprise solution that all teams can use.
  • Management packs can be installed for other products e.g. SQL Server and I believe some third party applications
  • Can setup thresholds for alerts so you receive a warning before you receive a critical alert so you have time to avoid a system outage/issue
  • Alerts can be sent via email or can use text service and we hook that into an automated phone system that will contact out of hours support and read the message for critical alerts.
  • Can customise dashboards - we paid for consultancy to create a RAG (Red amber Green) dashboard for our 3 SQL environments (DEV/PROD/DR) for a quick one stop heads up for any issues.
  • It is a monster of a system and really needs a person managing the system full time
  • Options are a bit clunky especially when you need to set overrides.
  • Takes a lot of time and effort to setup alerts as you want them, don't rely on the out of the box options you need to invest time into the system to get what you want out of it.
  • Make sure you size the underlying database server/s correctly (Microsoft provide a tool to calculate based on number of objects you plan to collect data on), it is a datawarehouse underneath after all.
It is great for alert/event management but requires a lot of time invested into setting it up correctly. But is a very powerful tool. Performance monitoring is less suited and more difficult to get anything out so we use it alongside other tools. But you can always push any alerts from other tools to system logs and get SCOM to pull them and alert.
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SCOM Scorecard Summary

Feature Scorecard Summary

Application monitoring (5)
8.1
Database monitoring (6)
8.8
Threshold alerts (6)
8.8
Predictive capabilities (4)
7.1
Application performance management console (4)
7.5
Collaboration tools (5)
6.6
Out-of-the box templates to monitor applications (6)
8.1
Application dependency mapping and thresholding (5)
7.9
Virtualization monitoring (5)
8.8
Server availability and performance monitoring (6)
9.3
Server usage monitoring and capacity forecasting (6)
8.6
IT Asset Discovery (5)
8.0

About SCOM

Microsoft's System Center Operations Manager (SCOM) is a monitoring and application performance management option.

SCOM Technical Details

Operating Systems: Unspecified
Mobile Application:No