Adobe InDesign Reviews

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Reviews (1-25 of 79)

Heather Robinette, MBA | TrustRadius Reviewer
February 13, 2020

A Must-Use Software for Marketing

Score 10 out of 10
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Adobe Indesign is mainly used by me as the marketing manager to design ebooks and sometimes other collateral as needed. Therefore, it is used in the Marketing department. InDesign has helped us in creating more collateral and being able to edit current collateral. We no longer have to get someone else to do it. We can do it ourselves, which allows us to do it faster and correct the first time since we know what we are wanting to be changed. We have become more efficient in our content creation and able to create more meaningful content.
  • Able to use in conjunction with Adobe Photoshop to edit photos within the document.
  • Able to create professional looking material without having to outsource the project.
  • Adobe continues to update the product so you are able to stay up to date on the latest tools.
  • If you are familiar with the other platforms, it is fairly similar so you can pick up on how to use it quickly.
  • It is sometimes hard to find tools or settings, I wish there was an easier way to find them versus having to look them up.
  • There are so many tools and features that it can be overwhelming for a new user, a new user tutorial would be helpful.
  • I wish there were more tools included on the left toolbox bar.
It is well-suited for marketing or graphic designers who need to create content such as white papers and ebooks. It allows you to easily create large documents with more flexibility. It is less appropriate for informal documents that would be better off just using Microsoft Word. Knowing the difference in which scenario meets your needs can help you accomplish the project faster and ensure the right resources are used.
Read Heather Robinette, MBA's full review
Jennifer Hess | TrustRadius Reviewer
January 17, 2020

An Industry Staple

Score 10 out of 10
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We use Adobe InDesign for design projects such as brochures, booklets, or sometimes single-page flyers (depending on the content). We are a small organization, and I am currently the only designer, so I am the only one who uses it. However, I serve as Marketing Director for some of my clients, and I manage other junior design team members there who also use it. InDesign is great for multi-page components, particularly those with dedicated sections or templates which need to be organized and displayed a certain way. It's also great for text-heavy projects, or those which use a lot of linked assets. Through use of shared Adobe Creative Cloud libraries and folders, it allows easy sharing between design teams, and avoids the need to package & send files between designers.
  • Include linked assets from Creative Cloud library for easy sharing.
  • Ideal for building page layouts and master templates for multi-page document formatting.
  • Can be difficult for beginners to understand tools and functionality.
  • Can sometimes be difficult to decide when to use InDesign vs Illustrator, depending on the project.
Adobe InDesign is an industry standard, and I would not trust a professional designer who did not at least have an intermediate level of knowledge in InDesign. It's best suited for multi-page documents, such as book publication, brochures or pamphlets. Its tools allow designers to build wireframe layouts, roughing in placement of images, text or other linked elements. The ability to create multiple page 'masters' allows for implementation of different template components for each document section. For example, the sections can use their own numbering systems, start at different intervals, have different background design components, and if the tools are used properly, they can be used to dynamically generate Table of Contents layouts which saves designers a lot of time. Content can be flowed between sections, so if additional text is added or the text area gets smaller, the text will flow to the subsequent linked text box. Additionally, it's well suited (and intended) for design all the way through the production process, so its print-ready export settings will typically accommodate professional print vendor specifications, supporting bleed, trim, gutter, and complex PDF export options.
Read Jennifer Hess's full review
Courtney Birnbaum | TrustRadius Reviewer
January 07, 2020

InDesign Remains a Master of Publishing, But Consider the Cost

Score 8 out of 10
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Since our transition to full-time Adobe InDesign use in 2017, our publishing group inside the larger company has seen streamlined production, improved quality in graphics produced, and growth in the ability for each team member to contribute to the larger picture of good design and style. We use InDesign every day to prepare magazines and other publications for print and digital distribution, and InDesign continues to offer new assets to our team. As part of InDesign's fuctions, Adobe Typekit — when functioning properly — allows a uniform look no matter which user or computer our designs are viewed on, as we can trust that Adobe's quality fonts are also consistent in appearance for everyone (and the included licensing pleases our legal department as well).
  • Publishing design: The variety of design tools available in InDesign are impressive, helping limit some of the work that needs to be handled in a second program like Photoshop or Illustrator so that we can complete a design sooner. When a second program is necessary, InDesign is also quick to integrate work between Illustrator and Photoshop as well.
  • CSV integration: Comma Separated Values sheets lower our production time in the best way. One InDesign template format with a CSV form can be used to produce the thousands of pages we need each year with the same information for different groups with just a few clicks, instead of the copying and pasting from records that used to be required.
  • InDesign does not seem to have a simple way to combine many files into one book or document that can be used at the same time. Indeed, it unfortunately runs slower the more pages you put into the same document, and if all pages are in one document, the pages cannot be edited by different people at the same time — no group editing option.
  • Most of InDesign's tools work well, and even those that are not as natural to learn, it is simple enough to adapt to using these tools. Selecting objects within groups can be difficult to do without going into the Layers panel, however, and I believe the most difficult feature that I used the most often is the guides tool, which could definitely use better functionality in setup, adjustment and having objects snap to them.
InDesign is my preferred tool for publishing, but it is cost prohibitive, and it is not so far above other publishing software options to make it my 10/10 recommendation because of this price issue. For businesses, groups or individuals with 1) heavy software use, 2) ample budget, and 3) nearly constant work to be done, InDesign makes immediate sense. Designers who need web hosting will also find InDesign a great option, because the Publish Online tool is so simple and satisfactory. For those learning to use publishing or who cannot afford the monthly drain that an Adobe Creative Cloud subscription insists upon, another publishing program, such as Affinity Publisher or a free and open source (FOSS) option, would be more appropriate. Other reasons that might make the monthly commitment to Adobe InDesign and its fees unnecessary include if 1) you are only infrequently using layout software and don't use other Adobe products, or 2) you do not need the freedom and customization options and can do the work in a word processing software just as well.
Read Courtney Birnbaum's full review
Allie (Allison) Egerer | TrustRadius Reviewer
April 23, 2020

The Go-To Software for Designing Intricate and Complex Documents

Score 9 out of 10
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Adobe InDesign is currently being used in our company to create and/or receive design files for our clients' direct mail needs, this mostly includes forms and envelopes. We also use it to create the copy decks for the direct mail we send out. The software is only used by our Marketing and Lettershop departments. The reason we choose Adobe InDesign over other products is because of it's complexity and because of its standardization in the industry. As far as complexity goes, we have found that other products just don't seem to compare when it comes to the amount of things the tool itself can do. We use it for aspects such as mail merge, layering, shared libraries, master pages, and much more. When it comes to standardization in the industry, you really aren't going to find a more standard product used for design than an Adobe product. It makes it much easier to work in a agency setting, like we do, when you use the same products as your clients.
  • Layering - When comparing to products like Microsoft Word, the layering becomes a big plus for Adobe InDesign. Layering allows you to turn "on" and "off" certain aspects of your document, such as if you wanted to show what a direct mail piece looks like with just the art work showing and then again with sample data showing by just the click of a button.
  • Master Pages - Again, when comparing to Microsoft Word, master pages in Adobe InDesign takes "styling" just a little bit further. It makes it much easier to create certain multiple styles that you can easily apply (or not apply) to various pages. Such as if you wanted the page number and company to show on certain pages, and not on others.
  • Cloud Libraries - This is a GREAT feature for companies who have multiple employees working in the software. When one employee adds an element to a Cloud Library, every other employee has access to it as well. This doesn't just pertain to images, like you would think - you can add things like styles, whole paragraphs (such as boiler plates), fonts, brand colors, and more. The great part is, you also don't have to be working in an online browser in order to access them.
  • Crashes - It is almost understandable because of how large the software is, but we have had issues with the product crashing randomly, more so than others software we use.
  • Incompatible Versions - Recently we have had some issues with opening files from other organizations and getting a message stating that their document was made with a "newer version" than ours and that it's incompatible - even though we don't have any pending updates to our software. It can be confusing because now that the Creative Cloud version exists, it seems like there should no longer be error issues for "newer" versions (such as InDesign 5.1, or InDesign 6.1, like there used to be - now it's just InDesign CC going forward with no newer versions.) So this error message, in theory, shouldn't be happening.
  • Complicated - Again, it is understandable because of how complex of a tool this is, but this is not a tool you are going to be fully able to train a coworker on in a week. In fact most people who have used it for years still probably only use about 10-20% of the tools features. This type of software, unlike Microsoft Word, is usually only used by people who work in field of design/creative, so you wouldn't expect every employee to be able to use it.
Adobe InDesign would be well suited for scenarios such as created very intricate documents, such as ones that are utilizing many different views or layers. It would also be well suited for creating very large documents such as creating manuals or books for print. A scenario where Adobe InDesign would be less appropriate would be for creating a logo or a graphic. It also might be less appropriate for something such as a simple company document like an offer letter, or a fax, not that it couldn't be used but it would be similar to using a scientific calculator to add 2+2, it's just too complex of a tool to be used for something as simple as that.
Read Allie (Allison) Egerer's full review
Leslie Ornelas | TrustRadius Reviewer
February 27, 2020

Marketing your company through Adobe InDesign

Score 10 out of 10
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We use Adobe InDesign throughout multiple departments in our organization, including Marketing, Finance, and Program Development. Even though we are a small organization, the design features of InDesign makes us look like a large corporation. We are able to development unique, innovative, creative and inspiring designs in both our internal and external publications. So long are the days on Powerpoint and Word designs for flyers and brochures, and we are now able to create a large majority of our designs in house saving us valuable money. This product has brought our organization to the new age in technology and we are beyond impressed with the outcomes we have seen so far.
  • Easy to use design features
  • Incorporate stock photos and personal photos for seamless look
  • HelpDesk or Helpful videos for beginners
We have a small staff and have recently been blessed with an intern who is familiar with Adobe InDesign. We are now able to do a large majority of printing and designing in house, instead of paying a company to do for us. This is saving us time and money. The fact that Adobe InDesign appeals to users of all ages is helpful in that they are entering the workplace already familiar with the software and don't require additional training.
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Brandon Hightower | TrustRadius Reviewer
February 19, 2020

InDesign Review

Score 10 out of 10
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We use InDesign in our technology classes. They use it to create posters and other fliers, with the purpose of learning the program. Our public relations team also uses it for creating the posters and fliers that we put around the school for events that are coming up within the school.
  • InDesign is really fast and can help boost production.
  • It is an awesome program for creating posters or fliers.
  • It does not work well with opening PDFs.
  • It can be a little difficult to get used to for first-timers to the program.
One place where we have found that InDesign has been really useful is with our public relations team at our school. When we have upcoming events or anything going on at the school they will use InDesign to create the posters and flyers for those events. We've also tried it in a technology class and our students have loved it and the ability it gives them to create something.
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Audrey Hoffman | TrustRadius Reviewer
February 12, 2020

The Best for Graphic Design Layouts

Score 10 out of 10
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I am a graphic designer and have used InDesign for 20 years. I originally used QuarkXPress as back then, it was the standard, but after getting familiar with InDesign, I quickly made the decision to switch as it was a better product. I've used it for almost every print project I've done.
  • Makes design/layouts easy.
  • It's incredibly flexible.
  • The integration with PDF edits could be smoother.
  • I wish there was more flexibility or more features within InDesign when translating to PDF forms.
It works well with almost any print layout project. The only time I choose to use something else, like Illustrator, is when the layout is more simple and graphic, such as logo design or astationery layout where I'm using elements from a logo in a simplified layout.
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Carol Heim | TrustRadius Reviewer
February 12, 2020

Adobe Creative Suite 6

Score 9 out of 10
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it is only being used by the communications department. It allows us to create and design various projects for a variety of departments in our organization. We produce everything from invitations, programs, collateral material, social media images, brochures, magazines, etc.
  • InDesign has so many excellent features, too many to name. A few that I find very helpful are the Character Styles. Creating styles within my documents saves me much time when formatting content.
  • Another feature I use frequently is the feature to export selections as JPEGs.
  • There are many times I try to copy images from Illustrator into InDesign and the image is too large so it makes it an EPS rather than an editable image. It would be nice if there weren't limitations on this.
  • It would also be nice if the Paste Into feature allowed you to do this to images at different times without erasing the previous Paste Into image.
InDesign suits our organization and our needs perfectly. It is the main program the communications department uses on a daily basis. It helps us create the promotional materials we need for our various departments. The functionality of InDesign over the years has really us saved time and resources. We miss not having an actual install CD so will be forced to move to the cloud sooner than later.
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Ellie Wilkinson | TrustRadius Reviewer
January 28, 2020

InDesign for magazines!

Score 7 out of 10
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Adobe InDesign is being used by our company to create brochures and a magazine. It is being used by our whole organisation but particularly in marketing, advert production and by content creators and editors. It is a create way to collaborate with the team and create impactful artwork. Our printers are happy to take our InDesign files.
  • Adobe is easy to use and taught at college level - everyone knows how to use it!
  • InDesign is the best programme to create magazines and brochures
  • I originally had difficulty in resizing the page size
  • The system can crash if you aren’t using the most upto date computer
Adobe InDesign is well suited to everyone and anyone creating magazines and brochures - I would not know where else to turn to create this type of document if it didn’t exist. If you are not creating printed documents you may be able to work with just Adobe Photoshop or a similar product.
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Irina Danilova | TrustRadius Reviewer
January 25, 2020

A must have tool for a marketing team

Score 10 out of 10
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Adobe InDesign is used across our Design Team and by e-mail designers/developers. All our print/marketing materials are created using InDesign. It helps a lot to have templates with all the brand styles applied and speeds up the process of creating new brochures, flyers, and email assets. As a person directly involved in designing webpages and email, I found it very easy to use InDesign to change templates, adjust image ratios, and standardize them. Also, exporting InDesign pages in a different format (we use PNGs for emails) is a breeze.
  • Great for creating master-templates for a variety of media.
  • Great text flow control.
  • Links do not auto update.
  • A learning curve may be steep for a novice.
As far as my experience goes, InDesign is a great tool to create layouts for all the possible print media, from a visit card to a book. Our company deals with travel, and it is imperative to produce high quality, visually attractive promotion materials: postcards, flyers, and brochures that are consistent in style and follow brand guides. InDesign is a great tool for this. It does not allow us to do image manipulation or create vectors, so other Adobe products have to be used instead.
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Paul Hughes | TrustRadius Reviewer
January 24, 2020

InDesign: the "go-to" page layout software

Score 10 out of 10
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InDesign is used in our Art Department, consisting of 8 Pre Press / Graphic Design personnel. It's primarily used to set up text and images to be exported as high-resolution pdf files. InDesign is used in conjunction with Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator.
  • Magazine layout. InDesign is extremely stable; you can link text from page to page in any order. You can have a story start on page 3, continue on page 8, and continue again on page 27. If you make edits to the text, it will reflow throughout the magazine/book.
  • It's perfect for creating comic books with various sizes and shapes of picture boxes, word bubbles, and so on.
  • Problems can occur when adding drop shadows to text. Sometimes the shadow can produce an undesirable effect on graphic elements below. The solution is to use Adobe Illustrator for drop shadows.
  • InDesign has a number of special effects that can be better done using Adobe Illustrator and importing into InDesign. Though if you do not have Illustrator, there is a lot you can do in InDesign.
I use InDesign to create comic books and instructional books with lots of graphics and diagrams (not at my present place of employment). If you are creating projects with large amounts of pages, InDesign is the tool to use. One of its main strengths is stability. If you have a file that is 500 pages with linked text and graphics, it will not bog down.
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Stephen Wittmaak | TrustRadius Reviewer
January 21, 2020

InDesign for what you need in your design.

Score 9 out of 10
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We use Adobe InDesign two-fold. We use it for creation and design of our own initiatives and projects, but also as an editing tool for work that comes in for us from the agency side of things. Being able to create and also edit with it has saved us time and money, especially during tight deadlines.
  • Creates flexible layouts
  • Easy import and organization of ideas and files
  • Massive learning curve to get from zero to functional usability of the program.
  • Layout for options isn't intuitive for Photoshop/Illustrator users
For anyone making print designs, InDesign is the go to standard, more so for booklets, pamphlets, anything with multiple pages or designs that have a lot of copy in layout, such as product detailers and one sheets. If you're doing posters, or badges or anything that has quite a bit of built in creative flair, is recommend sticking with Illustrator. You can use it, but you'll be exporting elements constantly from Illustrator.
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Leonardo Barbosa Corrêa | TrustRadius Reviewer
January 21, 2020

Adobe InDesign: dynamic and impactful publications

Score 10 out of 10
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I use Adobe InDesign in the company for text editing, corporate letters, folders, and newsletters. We are a small communication company, and I use the software myself. It is the most suitable professional tool for this type of service. It works very well with text distribution and combining text with images. It provides fundamental dynamic resources for a good layout.
  • Text flow
  • Table editing
  • Flip page export resources
Abode InDesign works very well with text distribution and combining text with images. It provides fundamental dynamic resources for a good layout. Adobe InDesign is less appropriate for editing images and building infographics. However, it is fully integrated with other programs on the Adobe platform that have these features. It has import tools that work in partnership with this additional software.
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Anthony Burke | TrustRadius Reviewer
January 21, 2020

Adobe InDesign is powerful and rewards practice... You get what you pay for.

Score 10 out of 10
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I use Adobe InDesign to create communications materials on a regular basis. I am a single-person department and the only person regularly using Adobe InDesign in our organization. Adobe InDesign gives me the ability to create custom materials for any situation and to fit the needs of our many different program areas. Adobe InDesign seems like a more flexible program that others and gives you the ability to create something just the way you envision it.
  • I think you can shape text more efficiently with Adobe InDesign, just by drawing text boxes.
  • It's easy to fit diverse elements together in the same document.
  • It's not as robust with image editing as PhotoShop or Illustrator, so that you might need multiple programs together.
  • The many many options make ID not always beginner-friendly - practice and tutorials help!
I love the program. Regularly, I am creating newsletters, brochures, and other communication materials with Adobe InDesign. It works great for all of these purposes. Generally, if a project is text-heavy, or if you are considering using Microsoft Word for it (both frequently happen for me), then Adobe InDesign works excellent in those situations. If you need a high degree of control over photos, other images, or you're looking to create graphics, then you would likely need to ID in conjunction with another program. I recommend it all the time, though with the caveat that it's not cheap. I am fortunate enough that my organization pays for the full Adobe Suite, which is primarily used only by me.
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Medline Masson | TrustRadius Reviewer
January 21, 2020

Most Robust Design Tool on the Market!

Score 10 out of 10
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Adobe InDesign is a powerful design software that allows creators the ability to develop graphic layouts for magazines, advertising brochures, and catalogs. Our creative team uses this application on a daily basis for client print work. The best thing about InDesign is that it is apart of the coveted Adobe Suite which offers nothing but quality. InDesign also has an aesthetically pleasing interface compared to other software that we used in the past to create print work.
  • Connects easily to Adobe's Creative Cloud.
  • PDF accessibility works smoothly.
  • Provide concise instructions for new users.
  • Add more vector tools.
Adobe InDesign has allowed our creative team room to create anything from small to large print formats. Some of the scenarios that Adobe InDesign has allowed us to improve our workflow is that we can create character, paragraph, and object styles to our design project easily saving us so much time. The only thing that would make this application perfect is the addition of additional vector tools.
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Richard Avenius | TrustRadius Reviewer
January 18, 2020

Adobe InDesign is the best print layout tool out there.

Score 10 out of 10
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At our organization, we use InDesign as our exclusive tool for creating custom print materials. I am an instructional designer and I use this program to create all of our print training materials like instructor and participant guides, informational flyers, and product documentation. Our marketing department also uses this program to create their print ads, two-pagers, and battle-cards. This tool is fantastic and allows us to quickly and efficiently create custom print documents, layouts, and templates.
  • This tool is really good at creating detailed print layouts in a relatively short amount of time.
  • InDesign allows you to create templates for a host of elements that you will use in the system. Whether it is page layouts, text styles, or even spacing preferences, you can customize and save your settings for all of the elements that you will use regularly.
  • Because Adobe provides separate programs for vector creation and picture editing, InDesign is fairly light in this kind of functionality. While this makes complete sense from a business standpoint, it is a little frustrating to have to go to a different program when I need to edit pictures and vector images.
  • The snap-to-grid and snap-to-line functionality in InDesign can be a little annoying. While it is sometimes very helpful, often the logic behind these functions force the lines that elements that you are trying to align into very different places. You can turn this logic off, though, if need be.
Adobe InDesign is an incredible print design tool for experienced designers and developers. It lets you create custom layouts quickly and effectively...if you are familiar with the tool and understand the underlying logic of Adobe systems. If you have the time to devote to learning how layering works and how all of the small simple creation tools can be combined to create more complex elements, you will find this to be maybe the most helpful tool you can use.
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Ashley Mumm | TrustRadius Reviewer
January 15, 2020

Adobe InDesign is a great tool for marketing departments

Score 9 out of 10
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Mostly used in the marketing and communications department, InDesign and other programs from the Adobe suite are used in our department for graphic design projects. Project scope is usually marketing related, but marketing needs are tended to in the communications department for the entire company. Offline (print) and online marketing materials are created.
  • Organization.
  • Design.
  • Display.
  • Automatic link updates.
InDesign is a great tool for marketing teams and other departments who need to create professional documents for online and offline needs. It is powerful enough to create great-looking print materials and yet can be basic enough that it can be self-taught to do simple projects. While other programs may do something similar, Adobe seems to have figured out many necessities for design professionals.
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Stéfano Bellote | TrustRadius Reviewer
January 13, 2020

Adobe InDesign is a great solution for your layout design needs!

Score 10 out of 10
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Adobe InDesign is used by the R&D, Design, and Marketing departments in designing new layouts for User Manuals, leaflets, flyers, banners, and any multi-page book or document which demands some graphic design development. We often make use of outsourcing for the bulk of new layout development and then make adjustments with inside resources. I find it an excellent software for this use, and the way it integrates with Illustrator and sometimes Photoshop makes it so easy to jump from and to software to deal with different demands.
  • Layout design - integrating graphics and texts.
  • Multi-page books and long format design pieces.
  • Not enough tools for vector design - Need to use Illustrator for complex designs.
  • Interface is not intuitive since it has a lot of tools and resources; it ends up being confusing for new users, although a similar layout to other Adobe Suite Apps makes it easier if you already use different software from the brand.
I recommend the Adobe InDesign app for layout designing; it has lots of tools and offers resources for different needs; it's the interface. It is very similar to other Adobe software, and it's easy to use if you already have familiarity with it. If not, at first, the lots of tools can seem overwhelming, but it probably won't take much until you dominate everything. It's great to design instruction books, catalogs, and other long-format books that demand graphic design inside, integrating well between images, graphics, and text. If you end up needing a more complex graphic design, then jump to Illustrator for a vector drawing, with more tools at hand, and when it's finished, export back to Adobe InDesign.
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Lourie Holl | TrustRadius Reviewer
January 08, 2020

The go-to software package for layout and design of multi-page printed material

Score 10 out of 10
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Adobe InDesign is our go-to software application for designing and creating the layout of our printed product brochures and information booklets. It is used exclusively in the marketing department, but we also create printed material for our R&D department. There is no other software application available that allows this kind of speed and ease of use when it comes to layout tasks.
  • Creating multi-page printed documents, like brochures
  • Creating print-ready PDF of EPS files in the format that the printer requires
  • The InDesign files of newer versions are rarely compatible with older versions, which makes sharing work difficult. There is an option to export to a universal file, but this is an avoidable hassle.
  • Menu items and workspace layouts are sometimes changed with newer versions, which causes confusion and requires a learning period before you can work at full speed again.
Designing printed brochures, flyers and information booklets is where Adobe InDesign shines. It's not a tool to edit images, although you have some options that help you avoid having to open up Photoshop. The two applications work hand-in-hand, and I can't use InDesign without going to Photoshop every once in a while.
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Veronica Rivera | TrustRadius Reviewer
January 08, 2020

Adobe InDesign is an amazing tool for designers.

Score 10 out of 10
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Adobe InDesign is primarily used by our creative team to create print marketing materials. Our team offers brochures, postcards, flyers, and other print marketing materials to our clients as a part of their product suite. We also use Adobe InDesign internally to create sales proposals and digital documents to help our sales process.
  • Print Layout
  • Digital Publishing
  • Improve handling of large image assets to speed up the program.
  • Color management could be improved to better manage colors.
Adobe InDesign is the industry standard when it comes to graphic design and print layout. It has all of the tools necessary to create stunning materials (brochures, business cards, sales materials, postcards, etc.). It is also great for digital and web products if you want everything to look crisp and clear. Its packaging and export features are amazing because they give you exactly the print-ready pdf, assets, fonts, and information that printers need. Adobe provides amazing support, and there is a wealth of information available if a designer needs help doing something.
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Nathan Morimitsu | TrustRadius Reviewer
January 07, 2020

InDesign offers power, but you need to be careful about how you use it

Score 9 out of 10
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I use InDesign to develop printed marketing materials ranging from business cards to brochures. The ease of usability, especially when it comes to updating graphics on a regular basis, makes InDesign my go-to for developing our frequently used printed materials. I also use it to create PDF files that are easy to search and browse, making for a more immersive experience on a computer or mobile device.
  • Incorporates graphics from Illustrator and Photoshop.
  • Makes searchable PDFs more intelligent.
  • It is a bit of a resource hog. For best results, double the suggested RAM and scratch disk space.
  • Sometimes the library items don't update as fast as other Adobe products.
I like to tell people that if they are designing anything that is more than one page/artboard, that they should use InDesign. For documents that are one artboard (and not just artistic in nature) Adobe Illustrator is typically a better tool. Having native support for PDF Files built-in makes it an incredibly powerful tool for documents that will be printed offsite or by a 3rd party.
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Michael Prewitt | TrustRadius Reviewer
December 18, 2019

Excellent Layout Software for Publishing Professionals

Score 10 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
Our company uses multiple Adobe applications within the Adobe Creative Suite; we have a Teams subscription plan. InDesign is used primarily for print layouts (periodicals, products, advertising, displays, etc.). Occasionally it has been used for design of graphics for a digital context (web banners, etc.)—although we tend to use Photoshop for that most of the time.

While multiple departments use Adobe apps, InDesign is primarily used by my department, and occasionally by others who need to use files we created. I would not consider it to be a great fit for people with very elementary design or publishing needs. But for people trained in graphic design, it is perfect. Our company also uses InCopy, which allows others to edit InDesign documents without getting tangled up in all the layout controls.

That InDesign works so seamlessly with other Adobe apps (Photoshop, Illustrator, Acrobat) is a big plus. I am a long-time user, since version 1, and consider InDesign to be the premier publishing app with the best selection of professional features. InDesign lets us create the kinds of designs we want with a minimum of effort, with fine control, and with great results.
  • InDesign has great control of text composition and flow. If spacing, kerning, leading, grouping text elements, hyphenation control, OpenType features, etc., are your thing, InDesign has got you covered.
  • InDesign has great layout and design features built in. You can create a lot of your layout elements right inside InDesign without needing other applications.
  • InDesign is not geared toward general office users. It has a complex user interface, and the level of controls could intimidate basic users. The workflow is more complex than creating something like a Microsoft Word or Apple Pages document.
  • The software is expensive. You can acquire it only through a subscription license plan, and this will set you back hundreds or thousands of dollars every year depending on the number of users in your company.
If you are doing professional graphic design, and especially if you are doing design for print or for digital publishing (PDF, etc.), Adobe InDesign is exceptionally good. For magazines, newsletters, books, DVD and CD jackets, business cards, signage, fliers and brochures, newspaper ads, bulletins, etc., it is an ideal software app. However, it does require a somewhat advanced level of computer operator skill, and the initial learning curve is a bit steep.

I would not recommend it for someone whose needs are more in line with what Microsoft Word or Apple Pages can do.
Read Michael Prewitt's full review
Bryan Hume | TrustRadius Reviewer
December 17, 2019

Efficient Design Management & Control

Score 10 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
InDesign is being used across our department to efficiently create marketing collateral. This includes case studies, whitepapers, email graphics, and social content across all channels. Although we use other pieces of the Creative Cloud, InDesign is always our first tool of choice when starting a design.
  • Social Media Design
  • Whitepaper Design & Templates
  • Occasional lack of movement precision: compared to Illustrator or Photoshop, InDesign doesn't always perform as well when trying to make very fine adjustments to graphic placement.
  • Image Editing: although image editing is largely reserved for Photoshop, it would be helpful to have more basic photo editing elements baked in for projects where more efficiency is needed.
I love Adobe InDesign. It can be extremely helpful for all aspects of marketing design, from graphics to PDFs. Although it's always best paired with Illustrator and Photoshop, it's a perfect central hub for design projects. We have used it for countless projects over the years, including massive print projects where reliability is crucial.
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Lisa Fargo | TrustRadius Reviewer
December 17, 2019

InDesign is a must-have for any professional designer.

Score 9 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
InDesign is used daily to create brochures, annual reports, multiple product/sales sheets and catalogs. It is the best way to organize, paginate and print prep multi-page documents. It is much more efficient than trying to organize multiple pages in Acrobat or Photoshop and the text tools are far superior. As an original Quark user, the transition to InDesign was a no-brainer. We would be lost without it.
  • Text editing
  • Multi-page organization
  • Better image editing tools
  • Better interpretation of vectors cut and pasted from Illustrator
Any project that is going to be over 6 pages long should be done in InDesign just for the page organizational capabilities alone. The paragraph/character menus and tools are far more advanced than other Adobe programs. If a project is vector or image-heavy AND limited pages, we tend to favor Illustrator.
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Janae Balibrea | TrustRadius Reviewer
December 17, 2019

Complex Program, Massive Capabilities

Score 6 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
We use InDesign to create quarterly performance reports for investors of our properties. The other assistant in the office and I are the only ones who use it. I use the program a few weeks each quarter (January, April, July, October). It addresses the problem of creating clean, clear, beautiful reports for our investors to get a snapshot of how their investments are performing.
  • InDesign makes it easy to have one template across a project.
  • InDesign makes it easy for you to create custom projects.
  • InDesign is complex to use and requires training.
  • InDesign makes it a little difficult to format text uniformly.
Adobe InDesign is well suited for creating custom, attractive, high-quality reports. It's not great for time saving and efficiency, so if you haven't learned the program and are short on time, it wouldn't be ideal.
Read Janae Balibrea's full review

About Adobe InDesign

Adobe InDesign supports creating digital and print documents such as flyers, stationary, posters, and other types of media, with rich graphics, images, and more. Adobe InDesign is available standalone or as part of the Adobe Creative Suite collection of media management and creation products.
Categories:  Desktop Publishing

Adobe InDesign Technical Details

Operating Systems: Unspecified
Mobile Application:No