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5 Ratings
3 Ratings
5 Ratings
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Score 8.5 out of 100
3 Ratings
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Score 10 out of 100

Attribute Ratings

  • FreeBSD and openSUSE Leap are tied in 1 area: Likelihood to Recommend

Likelihood to Recommend

10.0

FreeBSD

100%
1 Rating
10.0

openSUSE Leap

100%
3 Ratings

Likelihood to Recommend

Open Source

FreeBSD is an excellent choice to continue using older hardware and have it perform, it is a great choice for a UNIX based development environment. Although I haven't used it as a server, it is most suited for this - it would make an excellent, secure and robust server for and I would love to start using it for this as well.
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SUSE

OpenSUSE Leap is well suited for just about any Linux task. Especially I like to use it as Docker base image for my software deployments, because it has a wide variety of software packages available already precompiled and packages are well maintained - vulnerable software versions are patched in reasonable time. OpenSUSE Leap is rpm based system, and it wouldn't install Debian or other systems packages. If your software is not an rpm package then OpenSUSE Leap would not be suitable for your system.
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Pros

Open Source

  • Performs really well, even on older hardware
  • Secure
  • Robust
  • Package manager (pkg) is excellent
  • Large collection of ported software from Linux
  • Documentation is excellent (FreeBSD Handbook)
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SUSE

  • Maintenance of software packages using YAST
  • Availability of patches when a vulnerability is discovered
  • Distribution upgrades
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Cons

Open Source

  • Installation can be tricky for first timers
  • You need to be comfortable using a command line terminal most of the time
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SUSE

  • Commercial packages not always available
  • Stable packages sometimes lag behind the latest releases
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Pricing Details

FreeBSD

Starting Price

Editions & Modules

FreeBSD editions and modules pricing
EditionModules

Footnotes

    Offerings

    Free Trial
    Free/Freemium Version
    Premium Consulting/Integration Services

    Entry-level set up fee?

    No setup fee

    Additional Details

    openSUSE Leap

    Starting Price

    Editions & Modules

    openSUSE Leap editions and modules pricing
    EditionModules

    Footnotes

      Offerings

      Free Trial
      Free/Freemium Version
      Premium Consulting/Integration Services

      Entry-level set up fee?

      No setup fee

      Additional Details

      Alternatives Considered

      Open Source

      FreeBSD was the only operating system out of many I tried to install easily on older hardware and to run in a very performant way. For example, I had a lot of trouble trying to get Ubuntu to install on older hardware and when it did, it was too slow to use. FreeBSD installed quite easily and even after installing a desktop such as XFCE - it still run surprisingly fast. I was very impressed with it's performance, which it seems is a goal of the FreeBSD project.
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      SUSE

      openSUSE Leap has wide variety of already precompiled software packages in default repositories. It even has some specific packages in official repositories that are not available in other Linux distribution repositories. It is also very stable and reliable distro - we can predict when new versions will be released and when we should make system upgrades.
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      Return on Investment

      Open Source

      • As FreeBSD is free - the ROI is at least the cost of some commercial Linux or Windows based OS (which can be very expensive)
      • Allowed the re-use of older hardware that would have otherwise been disposed
      • No cost development environment
      • Opportunity for a no cost server setup also
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      SUSE

      • More effective maintenance means a smaller headcount needed for running the production servers.
      • The easiness of deployment means more time we can spend on software development of company-specific applications.
      • Great community support and overlap with other Linux systems mean that an answer to nearly any problem is usually one google query away.
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