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IBM Watson Customer Experience Analytics is a technology for recording and analyzing customer interactions on a company's website and any mobile channels. It allows the company to catch any mistakes or glitches in the system that may be hindering customer experience.https://dudodiprj2sv7.cloudfront.net/product-logos/Ao/K2/LJBNTOLGFJTR.PNGPractical CXAWe leverage IBM CXA predominantly in support of clients. We do, however, use it against our own web assets to understand customer journeys. Predominantly, we help clients first create a simulation to identify customer experience issues or opportunities and create a hypothesis. In collaboration with the company, we then establish a proof of concept using real customer transactions to validate our initial findings and confirm areas of opportunity. Whilst there are many low-cost tools that provide insight into user activity and indeed offer session replay, this is an invalid basis for analysis; the focus is on raw data and not drawing conclusions from user activity. IBM CXA is particularly strong for transactional assets such as an eStore. It can, however, be applied to any situation involving user activity. A particularly strong aspect of IBM CXA is the core foundation it sits upon - UBX or Universal Behaviour Exchange. Not only is the capture of user behaviour through activity automatically recorded, but other, physical activity can also be channeled into the solution e.g. physical store purchases, call centre interactions, etc. IBM CXA is, therefore, in a strong position to represent entire customer journeys and not simply digital ones.,IBM CXA comprises an acquisition called Tealeaf. This tool has deep heritage and this is evident in its present-day capabilities. The Universal Behaviour Exchange or UBX puts the concept of personalisation at the forefront. The ability to combine physical (analog) and digital transactions to create the complete picture of a customer journey, is a stand out benefit. The solution does not have to involve the purchase of software. IBM CXA can be sold as a service bundled with analytics as a service. This not only lowers the cost of ownership, it gets around one of the principal issues. Strong staff with design and analytical capability to drive the solution and deliver tangible benefits. The seamless integration of Watson AI services to help with the heavy lifiting. Watson reinforces the analytical focus this solution has and can learn to recognise situations specific to a company.,IBM CXA leverages script tagging to inspect specific behaviour patterns. A tagging engine against your web assets is a must-have to simplify script insertion and avoid having to leverage internal IT resources to modify web code. Tag management is perhaps the most challenging aspect of IBM CXA. In our view, this could be abstracted further and therefore simplified. We would like to see connectors with UBX to common platforms such as CRM, marketing automation. The more this is readily available, the quicker the time to value for clients.,7,The ROI question needs to be focused on clients and not our use internally. We leverage this as a platform for designing customer journeys for our clients. The ROI case is far easier to make for eCommerce operators. Customer journey failings can be easily quantified and seemingly simple issues can generate large ROI outcomes. For web assets without a trading bias, ROI can be established using notional value attribution. For example, a lead for motor insurance that is lost can be costed based on average policy value over a typical lifetime; struggle on a customer self-service portal can be quantified on the cost of handling through a call centre; etc.,Adobe Analytics and Lucky Orange,HubSpot, Microsoft Dynamics CRM, ARIS Business Process Management (BPM)Experiencing your website and mobile business as your customers doTealeaf provides a unique view into a website beyond what typical web analytics can provide. It captures all of a website's traffic, no need to tag pages or decide ahead of time what data you want to capture. Data is captured and processed in real-time which reveal unknown issues as they are happening. Replay session to see what a customer or user actually did and not just they remember doing when a problem occured.,Data is passively captured and is quick to implement because there is no need to change an app, which is great. Client side interactions also can be captured, but takes extra time because of integration into a site. There could be improvements made there. It can be hard to start making sense of the data because of the large volume of data it captures.,9,People tend not to believe the ROI because it tends to be so quick. Fraud detection and forensics pays for the product. Web analytics tends to be better understood than customer experience managment. I have used the product to find and resolve issues in hours where teams have spends months and sometimes years to find.,100,9TeaLeaf provides understanding and contextSpeed of searching for web sessions and users. This particular feature seems to impress me the most. When researching incidents where users report to have difficulty on our site, all we need is any of the unique identifiers of a user (email address used, IP address, user id) and we can locate their session(s) almost immediately in TeaLeaf. Multiple conditional events - I really like how we can have events contain already existing events. This helps a great deal if issues being researched become even more complex.,The Event Manager can be confusing to use if you aren't in it every day. It takes a few iterations of creating a more complex event for you to be able to get it right. Graphs of transactions/URL hits by hour can be misinterpreted if being shared with others outside of the area. If you run a report or view a graph from early in the hour it may be interpreted as a significant drop in requests.,7,Provides context to developers - As with pretty much any programmer, they need context of user activity leading up to a problem in order for them to debug code. TeaLeaf does a great job of doing that. We can identify a problem in the code, search for a TeaLeaf (and Java application session) that has the problem in it and show the developers what the user was doing when the problem happened. This greatly speeds up the time to resolution.,7IBM Tealeaf reviewTealeaf is exceptionally useful for troubleshooting technical issues and investigating conversion problems. It gives you the ability to look at individual sessions, so that you can see exactly what steps the customer has taken to cause the problem. This way you can recreate errors, or determine if the layout of the site is confusing the customer and preventing sales. Tealeaf allows you to create alerts to track specific problems. For example you can set an alert if the error handler on the site fires more than 5 times in 15 minutes, or if the completion rate of a specific process drops below a certain percentile. This lets your production support group get a jump on problems and gives them a chance to start working on a solution before the business users or the site help desk have reported the issue. Tealeaf allows you to create reports and dashboards to track activities on your site. You can set these up to monitor sales, sign-ups, errors, traffic load, just about anything. You can arrange to have these reports sent by e-mail, so business users can be kept up to date on the status of the web site. There are scorecards in Tealeaf that allow you to create reports to track a series of events. This let you see where people are falling out of a process so you can determine where customers are struggling and improve the customer experience. It's possible to shadow-browse a customer's web session, allowing a help desk analyst to provide better customer service by seeing what the customer is seeing and following along with their session.,IBM is still working out a solution for seeing Mobile App traffic in Tealeaf. What they have now allows you to see the response and request, but it doesn't show where the customer is actually clicking. They've promised that newer versions will be better with this. Tealeaf is pushing a web based viewer, trying to make this the standard over the more robust and extremely useful desktop based Tealeaf Viewer. the Web Based viewer is slow and clunky and just not as flexible, but IBM insists on pushing customers towards it. Last I heard, they plan for their mobile solution to only work in the web based viewer. Recently IBM moved all the support documentation for Tealeaf to the IBM Support portal instead of Tealeaf.com where it has been for years. This completely broke the in application Tealeaf Help. At the time of my last use of Tealeaf near the end of November 2013, when you tried to search help from the Tealeaf web portal, you were sent to the IBM support site, and once you logged in, the search request was lost and you had to start the search again. The search of the help files is also nowhere near as good as the original tealeaf.com help site. Also, if your users tried to use help, they were out of luck because only the Tealeaf Admins have access to the IBM support portal. At first they insisted that they were not going to fix this for older versions of the software, but instead only release a fix when the next version of Tealeaf was release. There was a large discussion about this on the LinkedIn forum and IBM has said they're working on a solution, but I'm not sure when/if that will get release.,10,Tealeaf has contributed signifigantly to our ROI, allowing us to detect problems quickly and find areas of customer struggle. We've used Tealeaf to look at sessions where customers have complained to see what their problem was and how we could resolve it for them. In my previous job at an insurance company, we were able to use Tealeaf sessions to prevent fraud by proving exactly when a policy was entered and what information was provided when policies were purchased.,9Tealeaf 8.8Identifying user paint points in an user-facing application integrating with other data sources and analytics systems Easy search functionality for finding sessions,Loading sessions can take time or doesn't work smoothly. Visual pages are missing in some sessions which can make it difficult to understand a certain user pain point. Segmentation for complex user-facing websites could require initial coding.,8,Faster defect identification. Increased employee efficiency. Better customer service.,8
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IBM Watson Customer Experience Analytics
25 Ratings
Score 6.3 out of 101
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IBM Watson Customer Experience Analytics Reviews

IBM Watson Customer Experience Analytics
25 Ratings
Score 6.3 out of 101
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Chris Hall profile photo
October 17, 2017

IBM Watson Customer Experience Analytics Review: "Practical CXA"

Score 7 out of 10
Vetted Review
Reseller
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We leverage IBM CXA predominantly in support of clients. We do, however, use it against our own web assets to understand customer journeys. Predominantly, we help clients first create a simulation to identify customer experience issues or opportunities and create a hypothesis. In collaboration with the company, we then establish a proof of concept using real customer transactions to validate our initial findings and confirm areas of opportunity.

Whilst there are many low-cost tools that provide insight into user activity and indeed offer session replay, this is an invalid basis for analysis; the focus is on raw data and not drawing conclusions from user activity. IBM CXA is particularly strong for transactional assets such as an eStore. It can, however, be applied to any situation involving user activity.

A particularly strong aspect of IBM CXA is the core foundation it sits upon - UBX or Universal Behaviour Exchange. Not only is the capture of user behaviour through activity automatically recorded, but other, physical activity can also be channeled into the solution e.g. physical store purchases, call centre interactions, etc.

IBM CXA is, therefore, in a strong position to represent entire customer journeys and not simply digital ones.
  • IBM CXA comprises an acquisition called Tealeaf. This tool has deep heritage and this is evident in its present-day capabilities.
  • The Universal Behaviour Exchange or UBX puts the concept of personalisation at the forefront. The ability to combine physical (analog) and digital transactions to create the complete picture of a customer journey, is a stand out benefit.
  • The solution does not have to involve the purchase of software. IBM CXA can be sold as a service bundled with analytics as a service. This not only lowers the cost of ownership, it gets around one of the principal issues. Strong staff with design and analytical capability to drive the solution and deliver tangible benefits.
  • The seamless integration of Watson AI services to help with the heavy lifiting. Watson reinforces the analytical focus this solution has and can learn to recognise situations specific to a company.
  • IBM CXA leverages script tagging to inspect specific behaviour patterns. A tagging engine against your web assets is a must-have to simplify script insertion and avoid having to leverage internal IT resources to modify web code.
  • Tag management is perhaps the most challenging aspect of IBM CXA. In our view, this could be abstracted further and therefore simplified.
  • We would like to see connectors with UBX to common platforms such as CRM, marketing automation. The more this is readily available, the quicker the time to value for clients.
  • As mentioned earlier, transactional heavy web assets such as eStores are particularly strong candidates.
  • IBM CXA along with other, similar tools, is not set-and-forget. The solution must be well managed in order to deliver value. Purchase of the solution is one thing; driving analytic results is another. If a company's staff are not strong analytical thinkers, CXA will not help. IBM CXA is not just a technology platform - it is a basis to design strong customer touchpoints and interactions. You need to be customer journey design literate to get the best from this.
Read Chris Hall's full review
Nick Preese profile photo
December 10, 2014

IBM Watson Customer Experience Analytics Review: "Experiencing your website and mobile business as your customers do"

Score 9 out of 10
Vetted Review
Reseller
Review Source
  • Tealeaf provides a unique view into a website beyond what typical web analytics can provide.
  • It captures all of a website's traffic, no need to tag pages or decide ahead of time what data you want to capture.
  • Data is captured and processed in real-time which reveal unknown issues as they are happening.
  • Replay session to see what a customer or user actually did and not just they remember doing when a problem occured.
  • Data is passively captured and is quick to implement because there is no need to change an app, which is great. Client side interactions also can be captured, but takes extra time because of integration into a site. There could be improvements made there.
  • It can be hard to start making sense of the data because of the large volume of data it captures.
Tealeaf is a must for any site that has a key business process that drives revenue for a company. It is not limited to only capturing a small percentage of visitors to your site, it captures every visitor to your site.

A lot has changed to the last year for Tealeaf for the good. There are many more options to for capturing data including a cloud and SaaS offering. Take a look again if you haven't seen it in a while.
Read Nick Preese's full review
Nick Wade profile photo
December 14, 2013

IBM Watson Customer Experience Analytics Review: "TeaLeaf provides understanding and context"

Score 7 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
  • Speed of searching for web sessions and users. This particular feature seems to impress me the most. When researching incidents where users report to have difficulty on our site, all we need is any of the unique identifiers of a user (email address used, IP address, user id) and we can locate their session(s) almost immediately in TeaLeaf.
  • Multiple conditional events - I really like how we can have events contain already existing events. This helps a great deal if issues being researched become even more complex.
  • The Event Manager can be confusing to use if you aren't in it every day. It takes a few iterations of creating a more complex event for you to be able to get it right.
  • Graphs of transactions/URL hits by hour can be misinterpreted if being shared with others outside of the area. If you run a report or view a graph from early in the hour it may be interpreted as a significant drop in requests.
Take a formal training class before diving in. It will benefit you greatly. I would suggest starting with an intermediate class if they have even a small understanding of the product beforehand.
Read Nick Wade's full review
Sherri Kidner profile photo
December 13, 2013

IBM Watson Customer Experience Analytics: "IBM Tealeaf review"

Score 10 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
  • Tealeaf is exceptionally useful for troubleshooting technical issues and investigating conversion problems. It gives you the ability to look at individual sessions, so that you can see exactly what steps the customer has taken to cause the problem. This way you can recreate errors, or determine if the layout of the site is confusing the customer and preventing sales.
  • Tealeaf allows you to create alerts to track specific problems. For example you can set an alert if the error handler on the site fires more than 5 times in 15 minutes, or if the completion rate of a specific process drops below a certain percentile. This lets your production support group get a jump on problems and gives them a chance to start working on a solution before the business users or the site help desk have reported the issue.
  • Tealeaf allows you to create reports and dashboards to track activities on your site. You can set these up to monitor sales, sign-ups, errors, traffic load, just about anything. You can arrange to have these reports sent by e-mail, so business users can be kept up to date on the status of the web site.
  • There are scorecards in Tealeaf that allow you to create reports to track a series of events. This let you see where people are falling out of a process so you can determine where customers are struggling and improve the customer experience.
  • It's possible to shadow-browse a customer's web session, allowing a help desk analyst to provide better customer service by seeing what the customer is seeing and following along with their session.
  • IBM is still working out a solution for seeing Mobile App traffic in Tealeaf. What they have now allows you to see the response and request, but it doesn't show where the customer is actually clicking. They've promised that newer versions will be better with this.
  • Tealeaf is pushing a web based viewer, trying to make this the standard over the more robust and extremely useful desktop based Tealeaf Viewer. the Web Based viewer is slow and clunky and just not as flexible, but IBM insists on pushing customers towards it. Last I heard, they plan for their mobile solution to only work in the web based viewer.
  • Recently IBM moved all the support documentation for Tealeaf to the IBM Support portal instead of Tealeaf.com where it has been for years. This completely broke the in application Tealeaf Help. At the time of my last use of Tealeaf near the end of November 2013, when you tried to search help from the Tealeaf web portal, you were sent to the IBM support site, and once you logged in, the search request was lost and you had to start the search again. The search of the help files is also nowhere near as good as the original tealeaf.com help site. Also, if your users tried to use help, they were out of luck because only the Tealeaf Admins have access to the IBM support portal. At first they insisted that they were not going to fix this for older versions of the software, but instead only release a fix when the next version of Tealeaf was release. There was a large discussion about this on the LinkedIn forum and IBM has said they're working on a solution, but I'm not sure when/if that will get release.
If you have a commerce web site, you want this product. It can be used by many different sections of the company. Product Managers can use it to see how many customers are looking at different products. Executives can use it to get reports on traffic and sales. The fraud department can use it to assist in litigation. The help desk can use it to assist customer. The Production Support group can use it to track problems and troubleshoot solutions, and developers can use it to see if customers are using their pages as the programmers expected, and use that insight to make the site better. All in all, while it's usually a pretty expensive solution, I believe in most cases it is worth the price.
Read Sherri Kidner's full review
No photo available
December 04, 2014

IBM Watson Customer Experience Analytics Review: "Tealeaf 8.8"

Score 8 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
  • Identifying user paint points in an user-facing application
  • integrating with other data sources and analytics systems
  • Easy search functionality for finding sessions
  • Loading sessions can take time or doesn't work smoothly.
  • Visual pages are missing in some sessions which can make it difficult to understand a certain user pain point.
  • Segmentation for complex user-facing websites could require initial coding.
When trying to understand and optimize the customer experience of your web and mobile applications
Read this authenticated review
No photo available
December 04, 2014

IBM Watson Customer Experience Analytics Review: "Tealeaf Realtime Data Monitoring"

Score 8 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
  • Extremely detailed in KPI measurement
  • Customization within portals is vast
  • Reporting needs improvement. Raw data is easy to extract but tough to analyze within the tool.
  • Not a very user friendly tool. Users must have some knowledge before trying create events.
Depending on the size of your site and the scope of how you wish to implement Tealeaf, be sure to understand how much data you are going to be collecting. Also, you will want to fully understand how Tealeaf will be implemented in your system and whether it will be through VM or a box you already own.
Read this authenticated review
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August 02, 2014

IBM Watson Customer Experience Analytics Review: "Highly suggested"

Score 9 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
To view customer sessions to see how they navigate the site. We align this with OpinionLab feedback to couch the comments. We also use it to verify releases as our site is personalized--it differs based on your profile.
  • Enables you to see the exact path and UI that the customer has taken.
  • More attributes to filter by.
Every website should have a program like Tealeaf. Aggregate data and click stream data is valuable but Tealeaf personifies your customer's experience.
Read this authenticated review

IBM Watson Customer Experience Analytics Scorecard Summary

About IBM Watson Customer Experience Analytics

IBM Watson Customer Experience Analytics is a technology for recording and analyzing customer interactions on a company's website and any mobile channels. It allows the company to catch any mistakes or glitches in the system that may be hindering customer experience.

IBM Watson Customer Experience Analytics Technical Details

Operating Systems: Unspecified
Mobile Application:No