What users are saying about

Amazon RDS

Top Rated
68 Ratings

Google BigQuery

64 Ratings

Amazon RDS

Top Rated
68 Ratings
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Score 8.4 out of 101

Google BigQuery

64 Ratings
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Score 8.8 out of 101

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Likelihood to Recommend

Amazon RDS

Amazon RDS is well suited if you need a highly-available, cloud-hosted, scalable database for websites or web applications. It can grow to serve as many queries as you need (at a cost) and is easy to configure. That being said, RDS can get expensive quickly depending on your use. If you're hosting a simple website or blog, it would be cheaper to stand up a database inside the EC2 instance powering the application. If you're not working with a lot of data, RDS can potentially be overkill for your needs.
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Google BigQuery

- If you are using Google Analytics and there is huge data that is getting streamed every day then you must have Big Query and use it for analysis. It is not only helpful for analysis but also for debugging your Google Analytics implementations.- For analyzing a small dataset you don't need Big Query you can use normal MySQL on your own premises. Analyzing on Un-structured data is not possible with Big Query.
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Feature Rating Comparison

Database-as-a-Service

Amazon RDS
Google BigQuery
7.6
Automatic software patching
Amazon RDS
Google BigQuery
10.0
Database scalability
Amazon RDS
Google BigQuery
7.4
Automated backups
Amazon RDS
Google BigQuery
7.7
Database security provisions
Amazon RDS
Google BigQuery
8.2
Monitoring and metrics
Amazon RDS
Google BigQuery
5.5
Automatic host deployment
Amazon RDS
Google BigQuery
6.9

Pros

  • It's quite easy to set up and provision new RDS instances.
  • Setting up multi-zone failover tolerant databases is literally just a couple mouse clicks.
  • Databases are automatically backed up and have minor version upgrades applied.
  • Set and forget.
Justin Schroeder profile photo
  • BigQuery integrates exceptionally well with Google Storage. All you have to do is push a CSV to Google Storage, and add it to BQ. BQ will try to detect the schema and import the CSV as a table. The process is very quick.
  • There are lots of ways to interact with BQ. Besides the web interface, there are also SDKs you can use to interface with bigquery from your tools. Meaning, it's not just data stuck in the cloud.
  • BigQuery lets you search extremely large datasets, quickly. We have many 100m+ datasets loaded, and searching any number of fields through them is not only easy (SQL!) but fast as well (most queries finish < 30 seconds). It's not a real-time system, but for OLAP, it's unbeatable.
Anatoly Geyfman profile photo

Cons

  • Currently RDS does not offer a No-SQL DB management through RDS. They have their DynamoDB offering for No-SQL, but I wish RDS offers popular No-SQL DB's like MongoDB in their offerings.
  • RDS does not provide access to the Virtual Machine. It provides access to the database instance but not to the VM that Database resides in. This is kind of a nice to have as it would allow for fine grained performance tuning of the DB.
  • Unifying RDS security by combining instance security model with AWS IAM model. Currently to manage an RDS instance you have to have two security models in place, one, to secure access to RDS through IAM and the other to secure access to the Database through the Database's own security.
Anudeep Palanki profile photo
  • Though it is SQL some syntax are different but they are getting used to after you use for some time.
  • The legacy SQL is in beta state but can be used and you can run the query with simple SQL.
  • More documentation is needed for using User-defined functions in Big Query.
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Alternatives Considered

Honestly, there aren't a lot of great alternatives to RDS, and most likely the real alternative is just running an instance on your local box. While lots of other services (like Rackspace) offer hosted database solutions, RDS in my opinion, is the clear winner on price, availability, and failover support
Justin Schroeder profile photo
Alex Andrews profile photo

Return on Investment

  • Much less time spent managing database versions, restores, cloning and uptime.
  • Allows us to create server clusters which can push our business goals.
  • Allows us to push the envelope of what's possible in our backend systems.
Justin Schroeder profile photo
  • Generating remarketing audience from Google Analytics data.
  • Reducing the cost for storage infrastructure
  • Comparability with different data sources and more depth analysis and efficient decision making
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Pricing Details

Amazon RDS

General
Free Trial
Free/Freemium Version
Premium Consulting/Integration Services
Entry-level set up fee?
No
Additional Pricing Details

Google BigQuery

General
Free Trial
Free/Freemium Version
Premium Consulting/Integration Services
Entry-level set up fee?
No
Additional Pricing Details