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Amazon Relational Database Service (Amazon RDS) is a database-as-a-service (DBaaS) from Amazon Web Services.https://media.trustradius.com/product-logos/7S/Sk/S1ZU73KQB51G.pngTruly fully-managed: Database made easyWe use AWS RDS to manage our MySQL and PostgreSQL databases without having to worry about issues like replication error, hardware failure or logs(general, slow, error) analysis. It is being used primarily by the database team but indirectly a lot of teams use RDS. Since RDS manages a lot of tasks for us, it frees us to focus on the business side of things.,Create snapshots on schedule or whenever required: RDS gives you the freedom to take manual snapshots at will or configure a backup policy wherein you can specify the time when the backup would be taken and the number of such automated backups to retain. You can restore a backup very easily whenever required with a few clicks. Monitoring: RDS comes with a lot of metrics like CPU utilization, free storage, freeable memory and read/write latency that you can create alarms on to make sure you can quickly resolve an issue. Failover: If you have a multi-AZ RDS set-up, failover is done automatically when the primary instance fails. This minimizes downtime Point-in-time-restore: With RDS, you can sort of time travel, creating a new instance and restoring the database state to a point in time in the past. Logs: The general, slow, error and audit logs can be published to CloudWatch for better analysis with a few clicks.,There should be a proper listing of all parameter groups alongside the instances that they are attached to. This would help to see which instances would be affected if a parameter group is changed. RDS should allow SUPER privilege to the master user. A few advanced tasks(like getting a physical backup using MySQL Enterprise Backup) fail because SUPER privilege is not available for the master user. A few parameters are not modifiable in the parameter groups and the access to the server filesystem is not given. This should not be the case because as an advanced user, you might want to understand things a little deeper.,10,RDS has made sure that we don't spend a lot of time resolving issues that are not even remotely relevant to our business use-cases. It has thus made the life of DB administrators easy which allows them to explore other avenues as well. Using RDS for around 10 years now, we have never had an issue BECAUSE of RDS. It is a very reliable service.,Azure SQL Database and Google Cloud SQL,10,Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2), AWS Cloud9, AWS ConfigAWS RDS - Let a huge part of database complexity to be handled by AWS at a fair price.At my current organization, we are using Amazon Relational Databases as our first option databases, supporting our DevOps environment. Currently, our monitoring system (based on Zabbix) and our configuration management system (based on Puppet) are using it as the main database. In our team, all databases are being based on AWS RDS PostgreSQL so far.,AWS products on average, excel at high availability. RDS is a good example of that. Easy scaling. Just a few clicks. Load balancing in a transparent way.,Sometimes you can't install specific items like modules. You are not able to use different DB versions from those provided by AWS. AWS keeps DB logs for a short time. If you have a problem and need to check something beyond the retention period, you can't.,8,You can easily increase your database environment without a huge investment. If you need specific resources that are not available without huge customization, maybe RDS is not the best approach for you. AWS also provides its DB flavour, called Aurora, which intends to be faster, reliable and cheaper than traditional commercial solutions like MS SQL Server and Oracle.,PostgreSQL, MySQL, Microsoft SQL Server and Oracle Database,5,AWS Lambda, Consul, Zabbix, Jenkins, Elasticsearch, Logstash,8Amazon Relational Database Service stays up at night, so I don't have to...Our organization runs lean, and as a small business that means that each employee wears multiple hats. With Amazon Relational Database Service we are able to deploy, backup, migrate, and manage a vast array of database servers without the need for a full-time Database Administrator. Amazon makes things like failover and backups so easy, my 89-year-old grandmother could do it.,Deploying a new database server can be achieved and configured in minutes. Backups are automatically scheduled, and can be as easy as a few button clicks. Failover on Multi-AZ Instances works like magic. Security is easily configured to other Amazon Services and the outside world.,It would be nice if the Storage of an instance could auto-scale. Accessing the server logs is something I've struggled with, as I don't have physical access to the server. It would be nice if snapshots could be exported from RDS.,10,Amazon RDS helps our organization run lean. We are able to scale as needed. Our data is safe and secure.,MySQL, MariaDB, Microsoft SQL Server and PostgreSQL,Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2), Amazon DynamoDB, Amazon Route 53, Google Cloud SQL, Oracle Cloud Infrastructure DatabaseGreat value for any sized teamAmazon Web Services Relational Database Service (RDS) is being used as our production data store running MySQL. We use it to store user information, click information, billing information. Additionally, we have a separate instance running PostgreSQL and storing some of our proprietary objects used to emit streams for our core business model.,Managed - RDS is entirely managed for us Scalable - It is incredibly easy to scale an RDS instance Support - AWS support is top-notch,Since RDS is managed, you are never truly a superuser, you just have admin privileges. Lack of direct access to MySQL files and whatnot. Downtime is scheduled on their schedule rather than yours.,10,We no longer have to pay for a database administrator. We no longer have to manage our own backups or upgrades. We are hoping to transition to AWS Aurora, and they have a builtin tool for that.,10,Snowflake, Databricks Unified Analytics Platform, Apache SparkAWS RDS review for EngineersWe use AWS RDS service for multiple applications as a backend for MySQL Databases. It helped us in updating MySQL versions, backups, and snapshots. We don't have to spend time managing and maintaining infrastructure, and we spent the most time on business. We can choose or readjust capacity based on demands and also automatic backups stored on S3 bucket.,Automatic updates. We can scale the resources. 99% availability.,It needs some basic aws console experience to set up RDS.,10,Great support. Flexibility. Restoring it from Snapshots.,AWS EC2 Container Service, Amazon Elastic Block Store (EBS) and Amazon CloudWatch,10,JIRA Software, MySQLAmazon Relational Database Service ReviewAmazon Relational Database Service is used to host databases accessed by web applications that are on servers hosted within AWS EC2. There is also a database hosted in RDS used by end-user desktop applications.,As with all AWS services, it is fast and easy to get set up. It integrates well with the rest of your infrastructure hosted within AWS. The point in time backup/restore options work well.,There are use cases where you have to delete and recreate your entire database instance just to change one thing. SQL Server backup and restore to file is not a simple GUI-driven process. Read replicas are not offered for Microsoft SQL databases.,8,RDS makes projects much easier. Set up time is decreased, and it is very easy to create and destroy databases as needed for testing. The ability to call AWS tech support for database-level issues and advice is a money saver if you don't have a high-end DBA on your team or need someone else to set things up with a little assistance. It is cheap and easy to grant secure access to your RDS instances to other companies or divisions of your company that use AWS.,7,9,Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2)My experience with Amazon RDSWe use Amazon RDS across our organization to provide website data and data for applications used internally. It allows us to have fully managed MySQL and PostgreSQL instances at our disposal without the headache of maintaining backups and doing minor upgrades manually or setting up redundancy.,Amazon RDS handles database backups for you and allows you to rollback if needed. This is beneficial because we do not have to take the time to set up and manage our own backup schedule. Amazon RDS allows full access control via Security Groups. This is vital to ensure the security of our data. With Amazon RDS, we have monitoring capabilities that allow us to trigger actions. This is important because we are not always watching our RDS instance health 24/7.,Amazon RDS could possibly make the major upgrade process easier somehow. Amazon RDS has been an exceptional product in my eyes, so I find it very hard to think of areas it needs to improve.,10,Amazon RDS has a great ROI because it costs less than other Cloud providers' offerings in this space and does as much or more. Amazon RDS is less expensive to run than on-premise solutions or data-center solutions because of the maintenance attention required.,10,10,,Amazon CloudFront, Amazon DynamoDB, Amazon Elastic Block Store (EBS), Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2), Amazon CloudWatchAmazon RDS -- Good cloud-based database serviceWe have been using AWS RDS with MySQL for internal as well as production level since 2014. Amazon RDS is the best option to host relational databases. We are using AWS RDS to support our web service and website solution for the client, which exceeds 1+ million hits over a month.,High availability and scalability with HIPPA compliance for sensitive data. Great interactive console and configuration option. Great availability of cloud watch triggers. Very fast and easy to create a backup and restore.,It's a little bit complex for new users to understand all configurations. Security group creation and maintenance is time-consuming. Costly for small organizations.,7,Improved the performance of the system. Provides the support of a large and scalable database, which lead to the ability to serve multiple requests simultaneously.,Google BigQuery, Amazon Redshift and Microsoft Azure,Amazon S3 (Simple Storage Service), Amazon Redshift, Amazon CloudWatchA Solid Choice for RDS HostingAmazon Relational Database Service is used by our Development team to centrally host data that our customers create using our application. Our customers are all within North America. Our application can use either MySQL or Amazon's Aurora, interchangeably. Amazon's RDS tools allowed us to quickly move from a distributed application with local databases on each customer's PC, to a SaaS model with multi-tenancy.,Console is very intuitive, allowing new users to figure out what is possible without having to search documentation to do each and everything. Seamless upgrade process from MySQL to Aurora. Easy restore process from automated or manual backups. Leverages aspects/services also used by EC2 and other AWS services to implement security and balancing.,Unclear on pricing while choosing instance resource levels, must browse to a separate calculator instead of just displaying it on the page in real time with the selected options. Must pick from pre-configured resources(CPU & RAM) per instance class, while GCP allows you to adjust resources to whatever level desired. Has some restrictions on what configuration adjustments can be made to the server when compared to other hosting options.,8,Simplifies and Automates vast majority of MySQL/RDS matters to alleviate time needed from DevOps staff. Allows initial trial and lower resources for free to become familiar with tools before having to pay production-level costs.,Google Cloud SQLShaik Review on Amazon Relational DatabaseWe started recently using Amazon Relational Database service in our company. We are exploring the usage and trying to utilize it at the maximum level. Still we are in the learning phase. Presently we are using Amazon Relational Database service in building reports, Analyzing the data in different ways. As I said earlier still we are in the learning phase as of now we are in good shape.,Data storage and retrieval of data at high speed. Able to store a huge amount of data. Analyzing of data became more accurate.,Price is a little high Multi-Master replication Storage capacity needs to increase,9,Man hours saved Accuracy in analyzing Too Costly Reliable, Simple and Effective,SAP HANA,SAP HANA, Microsoft AccessAmazon RDS - Quick and Easy Way to Get Set up With Enterprise Database Architecture and ManagementMy organization uses Amazon Relational Database Service (RDS) to manage all of its Databases. The nice thing about RDS is you don't need to have a traditional Database Administrator on staff. Creating an instance of any of the many Database offerings (MySQL, Postgres, etc.) is as easy as a push of a button, and all the complexities around managing your data become very simple.,End-to-end management of your database -- including configuration, handling security, and maintenance. Offers compatibility with many (and the most popular) database technologies -- including but not limited to MySQL, Postgres, Microsoft SQL Server, Oracle DB. Makes backups and replications very easy, which is one of the toughest things to do effectively.,The logging options aren't as good as you would have if you managed your database yourself. Restricted rights and permissions. Because you are using a managed service, you don't have 100% of all the capabilities you would traditionally have when managing a database yourself. Because you are using a managed service, that's meant to do a lot for you and make things easy, you are paying a premium price. Some tasks are very simple (for even standard software developers, not even for a DBA). If you don't need to scale and aren't in a rush, the price might not be worth it.,10,Saved money on hiring SQL specialists or Database Administrators. The security and back-ups offered help make my company's software solutions Enterprise-grade, which is necessary in today's world. Save time because doing almost anything database related is very fast and only requires a few button clicks.,Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2), MySQL, PostgreSQL, MongoDB and Microsoft SQL ServerA great, scalable, transactional engineMy organization has, since the beginning, utilized RDS as our transactional, day-to-day database, at first staging all incoming data in a PostgreSQL. Although it has performed so well that it now handles all of our data warehousing and has handled our heaviest queries with enviable aplomb. We had initially staged data in RDS for migration into Redshift, but have determined that running well-optimized queries on our particular volume of data--certainly not the petabytes that would justify Redshift--our PostrgreSQL database on RDS is actually more performant.,Security... being in the AWS stack, you get all the "warm and fuzzies" that come with knowing your data is secure. And user management couldn't be easier. Flexibility... Aurora, PostreSQL, MySQL, Oracle, SQL Server--RDS can run any of them. Scalability... when all else fails, add more hardware! To a point... and there is a point (see: petabytes) at which you might consider bumping up to RedShift, but for the other 99.99%, RDS is the place to be.,My engineers would be able to speak more thoroughly to the cons. I have only benefited from the fruit of their labor. I can say that, from a Project Management standpoint (interfacing with RDS via a PostgreSQL client and my dashboards), it has only performed well so far.,9,Switching back to RDS from Redshift has made my BI Dashboards much more performant (though again, we're not dealing with data in the magnitudes that justify the Redshift toolset). It has decreased our tech debt. Engineering has been much more straight forward. Our uptime has been improved by removing unnecessary data migration processes.,Microsoft SQL Server and MongoDB,PostgreSQL, JIRA Software, ACTIVE NetworkRDS: a growing solution for your everyday database needsAmazon RDS is a great service for managing all of your relational database services in a simple manner. In our shift to data analytics and a cloud infrastructure for our applications, RDS was invaluable in providing consistent backend support for all of our applications, both small and large. Its ability to quickly hook up to any existing AWS infrastructure and replicate itself across multiple AZs meant that we could quickly adjust the availability and cost efficiency of an application's database as it scaled.,Scalable to infinity. If you want scalable infrastructure, RDS will provide it for you in droves. You automatically launch across multiple AZs to ensure failover solutions, and can choose to launch additional read replicas or database snapshots to ensure snappy reads and data availability. Allows you to focus on the application instead of managing a database. While this leads to tradeoffs in your control of the database, it allows a reduced DB management team and can ensure an application can get off the ground as soon as possible.,You do have a lack of control when it comes to the minutiae of database management. Replication topology, SUPER privilege, direct access to data directories and logs are all restricted with RDS making it harder for the experienced RDS sysadmin to run their system. Availability reduced in some ways to make other options easier. The only feasible method is multi-AZ deployment for replication and planned downtime makes it hard to keep a running application at times Lack of access to the professional tools of RDS systems means that you have reduced insight into how your system is performing.,9,Allowed us to quickly throw together a database solution for a growing application that had outgrown its current solution. In a couple of days we had a highly available cost efficient database up and running that was easy to connect to the applications existing infrastructure. Some of our sysadmins didnt appreciate the restrictions that aws RDS placed on their ability to manage and monitor the databases that were assigned to them. Many opted for more intricate database systems for our longstanding applications so that they could ensure everything was running well and no data was being compromised.,Amazon DynamoDB and Azure SQL Database,Amazon DynamoDB, Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2)RDS, a light weight RDBMS for microservicesCurrently, Amazon RDS is used as a data store for all the micro-services in my organization. It is particularly suitable because, in a very loosely coupled micro-services landscape, none of the services need a complex table structure and limited data redundancy is tolerated. Hence, a medium instance of RDS is more than capable of servicing our production-grade micro-services without the maintenance cost of an on-premise RDBMS.,It is scalable and fault tolerant. It is provided as a managed service without the need for an on premise data center. It is highly capable and a fast enough data source for a production-grade lightweight microservice.,It is not suitable for a very complex database where every performance aspect of a database needs to be granularly fine-tuned. Adopters have to take care of data security. It is not suitable for analytics.,8,Minimal hardware costs as compared to an on-premise data center. Huge savings in licensing costs. Easily deployable, so no advance planning and provisioning required. A new instance can be spun up in minutes.,,Gitlab, Terraform, JenkinsRDS - More bang for your buckAmazon RDS is our core database platform. It is used for both development and production loads, throughout the company. RDS provides us with a full-featured database without the cost of managing the server or installation.,Hands-off managed service allows us to focus on how we use the database and not managing the database. Multiple database choices provide us with the ability to choose the best product for the intended use case. Automated snapshots take the pain out of disaster recovery.,RDS databases are not encrypted by default, so you have to remember to add encryption when you set it up.,8,RDS allowed us to focus on the application and not waste time managing the database itself. RDS has many choices available, allowing you to use small instances for development and testing while scaling up to larger instances for production loads.,MySQL and PostgreSQL,Zoom, Microsoft Visual Studio CodeAmazon Relational Database Service takes the stress out of DatabasesWe are using Amazon Relational Database Service to provide various managed database clusters, enabling us to have our data replicated to multiple availability zones, in addition to nightly backups, and managed updates without downtime. Since Amazon Relational Database Service supports MySQL and MariaDB, we are able to use RDS without changes to our platform, removing vendor lock-in.,Redundency Managed Updates Security Unified billing,Unable to run custom software on RDS servers Customer support is lackluster Price,8,Removes need for support Allows existing applications use the same DB technology Integrated into AWS VPC already,MySQL, MariaDB and InfluxDB,Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2), MySQL, InfluxDB, MariaDB, Google Cloud DatastoreI can't think of a reason not to use Amazon RDS (especially Aurora)We use RDS to run all the databases to run our platform for both OLTP and analytics/reporting purposes. This includes traditional PostgresSQL Aurora PostgeSQL. and Aurora MySQL implementations.,RDS provides high availability databases without having to manage your own servers. Amazon Aurora in particular is a breakthrough database technology, and in particular with the PostgreSQL engine provides advanced features at a fraction of the cost of an Oracle implementation, with better features that have been designed from the ground up to support the cloud. Aurora also allows supports large clusters of database servers easily, with super fast replication (~20 ms), and flexibility to allow changing resources provisioned based on workload.,Cross-Region replication is supported for most platforms and engines, but is not available across the board yet. Where it is available it provides an excellent solution for disaster recovery.,10,Very positive. It has reduced our need to have IT Operations and DBA resources, and with Aurora we have been able to get better performance with less compute power required (that is, with a lower monthly spend).,Microsoft SQL Server, Oracle Database and MySQL,.NET, Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2), Amazon ElastiCache, Amazon CloudFrontA developer's take on AWS RDSAmazon RDS is one of the primary data stores for all applications in our organisation. We also use AWS DynamoDB, Elastic Search, Redis etc apart from RDS. We preferred RDS over other DBaaS because it's a part of AWS which is highly reliable and scalable, and it is a completely managed solution which is simple, easy to use and also offers advanced features required by DevOps team.,Zero manual configuration, you can get an instance up and running in just 5 minutes. High scalability (RDS simplifies setting up master-slave cluster) and reliability (Multi AZ replications). Automatic backups so that we don't have to worry about losing data.,Hard to debug performance issues at times since it is a managed service and we don't have all privileges.,8,We do not require dedicated database admins, which saves both money and man power. It's easy for developers to manage infrastructure thanks to RDS.,AWS Lambda, Amazon API Gateway, AWS Elastic BeanstalkRDS to the rescue. Let You're DBAs be DBAs, rather than Server AdministratorsOur company has a cloud-first and AWS first strategy that includes creating and moving databases to the public cloud. We started this journey seriously about 2 years ago and have decided to use RDS services as often as possible, instead of using EC2 instances for our database environments. While our footprint in the public cloud is still a small part of our overall compute, we are finding that RDS is meeting our database needs are we are migrating and creating new ones. RDS is not only solving issues for the operations of our business, we are also using RDS as part of our overall data lake strategy.,Getting the data in and out of our databases, especially with the close integration RDS has with S3 buckets. Less overall management of the database servers. Our DBAs are now do more DBA work than server admin work, which moves them higher on the value chain. Performance and Scalability.,Some of the RDS (like Redshift) still lack a SQL programming language like t-SQL, but are getting better all the time. Depending on the database chosen, pricing is still dictated by the vendor like Oracle or SQL-server. For problem deep in the system, not having machine access can be problematic.,10,Positive - Move to Redshift from Oracle could save us up to 50% annually on database licensing Positive - Move to Aurora is helping us save on on premise support we pay for mySQL Negative - still, hard to find a true cost of ownership until several months of use under you're belt,Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (EC2),Slack, Tableau Desktop, SAP PowerDesignerRock solid cloud database hosting.We use amazon RDS to offload database systems from the primary server stack. This is particularly useful for us in 2 scenarios: 1. You are running server clusters and the database needs to be external to those clusters for consistency. 2. You are operating some shared services and need to sandbox a particular set of data or application.,It's quite easy to set up and provision new RDS instances. Setting up multi-zone failover tolerant databases is literally just a couple mouse clicks. Databases are automatically backed up and have minor version upgrades applied. Set and forget.,We have at times dealt with a few latency issues between RDS and our server instances even when they are in the same zone. This isn't a big deal if you're appropriately caching, but if you were to run a CMS, say Drupal, without caching on RDS from an EC2 instance it could be quite a bit slower than using a single box. Occasionally Amazon will depreciate a particular version and you are forced to "do some work" to migrate your database in a time period you may not have anticipated. Not sure there is any way around this for anybody, but it's a thing to think about.,8,Much less time spent managing database versions, restores, cloning and uptime. Allows us to create server clusters which can push our business goals. Allows us to push the envelope of what's possible in our backend systems.,Rackspace and MySQLFor High availability -Relational Database Service are optimized solutionRDS manages replication if databases are in multiple-avaliable zones.,Easy to handle master and slave nodes Synchronization of data between the instances Easy to administrate with AWS console,RDS is much more expensive than MySQL+EC2.,8,Provides you with six familiar database engines to choose from, including Amazon Aurora, PostgreSQL, MySQL, MariaDB, Oracle, and Microsoft SQL Server. Easily migrates or replicates your existing databases to Amazon RDS. It frees you to focus on your applications so you can give them the fast performance, high availability, security and compatibility they need.,Reliable web databases at scaleWe use Amazon RDS as the backing data store for our various microservices as well as the utilities that manage service scheduling and system availability. Our primary databases are configured with Postgres, but our management utilities use MySQL under the hood. In production, we also use a high-availability configuration with automated failover to a backup system. This is all to say we use RDS extensively in our organization and the reliability of the platform provides both us and our customers with piece of mind.,Multiple availability zones for high assurance of uptime Both hosted and local management/reporting utilities Integration with CloudWatch and CloudFormation for automated creation and real-time performance metrics,Postgres, in particular, is configured in such a way as to prevent access to the `postgres` user. Considering things like database extensions are installed under this user, if extensions ever need to be removed/modified, you have to rebuild and migrate your entire database! Cross-system database migrations are somewhat slow and, in many cases, require a great deal of manual work to ensure data type information (i.e. UUIDs or Integers) is properly set-post migration (otherwise many types are re-cast to strings).,9,Our databases are highly reliable, meaning our systems team can focus on other business endeavors rather than maintenance.,SQL Azure,AWS Lambda, Amazon DynamoDB, JIRA SoftwareRDS: Secure, scalable, and universally trustedAmazon RDS holds and manages data for our core operations. We accept somewhat sensitive data: PII, but nothing PCI-protected. The well-vetted security of the service, along with its outstanding configurability, make it a perfect option for maintaining trust with our clients. RDS easily upgrades when we need to scale and was seemingly built with the expectation that it would fit neatly into an event-driven architecture. Automatic backups, read replication, everything is exceptional. I'm trying to think of a complaint or drawback, but I can't.,RDS received provisional FedRAMP-High Authorization in January of 2017. When our clients ask us how our data is encrypted and secured, we mention that it's encrypted at rest on Amazon RDS, and that (so far) has instantly established trust in every instance. RDS makes everything easy - automatic backups, encryption at rest (above a certain service tier), ultra-fast upgrades, and excellent configurations for event hooks and logging. RDS is impressively fast and available. Our RDS instance literally has never had a failure or problem of any kind.,It's really hard to think of any areas for improvement. I think the console could maybe use a simpler interface or walkthrough for newer users who know what they want, but are unfamiliar with the technical terminology. It would be great to be able to automatically spawn a lower-tier RDS instance for staging and development environments, mirroring the functionality of the higher-tier production environment but minimizing costs. Because DynamoDB is not encrypted at rest (yet), it would be really nice to see more documentation about creating simple, semi-serverless applications with an RDS-Lambda-API Gateway setup.,10,Using AWS in general, and especially RDS, has made it extremely easy to gain the trust of enterprise-level clients who have significant security and privacy concerns. The scalability and rapid upgrade process of RDS has freed my business from a lot of growing pains. Thanks in part to RDS, our hosting costs account for under 1% of operating costs.,LibreOffice, IntelliJ WebStormBest SaaS solution in marketAs a part of the shift in the organization from moving away from Oracle to open-source systems, we started developing micro services. The micro service architecture emphasizes on small sized databases and APIs that control access to the data. So in the pre-micro service era where we have one monolith DB that's managed by Infrastructure teams, the new architecture demands new DBs. Traditionally speaking, spawning new robust and production ready databases used to be difficult. For developers, it involves procurement of hardware, connecting it to the network, installing new DB software, setting up robust backup scripts for the data; which is a lot of work. Amazon RDS offers SaaS to replace the above work, making it super easy for a developer to spawn a new instance by filling up a short form and clicking a button.,Making it super easy to spin up new instances. It's as simple as filling up a form and clicking a button. RDS offers a catalog of popular databases to choose from. This provides options for companies that have code that's strongly coupled with a database and for developers to try new databases to solve a problem. RDS takes care of creating backup scripts and multi zoning your data for making the database robust. RDS ties really well into the rest of Amazon's security model, making the data secure.,Currently RDS does not offer a No-SQL DB management through RDS. They have their DynamoDB offering for No-SQL, but I wish RDS offers popular No-SQL DB's like MongoDB in their offerings. RDS does not provide access to the Virtual Machine. It provides access to the database instance but not to the VM that Database resides in. This is kind of a nice to have as it would allow for fine grained performance tuning of the DB. Unifying RDS security by combining instance security model with AWS IAM model. Currently to manage an RDS instance you have to have two security models in place, one, to secure access to RDS through IAM and the other to secure access to the Database through the Database's own security.,10,A very positive ROI, since RDS effectively replaces the wasteful Infrastructure teams for small scaled organizations. Since, with RDS you pay for what you use, its a lot more efficient than paying rent and maintaining data centers for the resources you might not always need. The side effect of moving to RDS is allocating budgets. In Pre-SaaS era, its very difficult to answer the question, how much does a project needs to pay for infrastructure, but with moving to RDS, we could allocate cost centers allocated for the project to each instance and we could get fine-grained cost allocations.,Docker,Amazon S3 (Simple Storage Service), React, Neo4jGreat for a quick analytics database, wouldn't use it for production thoughAmazon Relational Database Service (RDS) hosts a Postgres instance that we send our production MongoDB data into. We then use metabase (http://www.metabase.com/) on top of RDS for analytics. MongoDB hosts all our production data and is the source of truth, but we copy that data into RDS because most of our non-technical staff are not proficient with MongoDB's aggregation framework and because we don't want to risk an errant query hurting our production database's performance.,Quick and easy hosting for SQL databases. Setting up Postgres locally is a nightmare and we don't have experience managing it, RDS has made it easy. Easy to set up tools like MySQL to pipe your real production data into RDS. Gives you a nice neat Postgres URI that you can point metabase, wagon, etc., at for analytics.,RDS is expensive compared to running a self-hosted SQL database on EC2 (once you get past the generous free tier). Currently the cheapest on-demand RDS instance costs $0.041 / hour, whereas EC2 t1.nano instances cost $0.006 / hour. $29/mo seems expensive given that we have no need for blazing performance or multi-availability-zone durability. I don't believe traditional RDBMS have any business being production databases in this day and age, so I find RDS' focus on performance and durability to be wasteful and distracting. Like most AWS products, the documentation is exceptionally complex and difficult to navigate, and the UI displays an awful lot of superfluous information.,10,Combined with metabase, RDS has enabled numerous non-technical members of our team to run and share sophisticated queries. The engineering time spent on worrying about RDS has been minimal. We set it up once over a year ago and haven't touched it since. We're relying on metabase and RDS more for operations-related dashboards, because it's generally faster to iterate on a simple query than a complex web application.,Amazon Redshift,MongoDB, PostgreSQL, Slack
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We use AWS RDS to manage our MySQL and PostgreSQL databases without having to worry about issues like replication error, hardware failure or logs(general, slow, error) analysis. It is being used primarily by the database team but indirectly a lot of teams use RDS. Since RDS manages a lot of tasks for us, it frees us to focus on the business side of things.
  • Create snapshots on schedule or whenever required: RDS gives you the freedom to take manual snapshots at will or configure a backup policy wherein you can specify the time when the backup would be taken and the number of such automated backups to retain. You can restore a backup very easily whenever required with a few clicks.
  • Monitoring: RDS comes with a lot of metrics like CPU utilization, free storage, freeable memory and read/write latency that you can create alarms on to make sure you can quickly resolve an issue.
  • Failover: If you have a multi-AZ RDS set-up, failover is done automatically when the primary instance fails. This minimizes downtime
  • Point-in-time-restore: With RDS, you can sort of time travel, creating a new instance and restoring the database state to a point in time in the past.
  • Logs: The general, slow, error and audit logs can be published to CloudWatch for better analysis with a few clicks.
  • There should be a proper listing of all parameter groups alongside the instances that they are attached to. This would help to see which instances would be affected if a parameter group is changed.
  • RDS should allow SUPER privilege to the master user. A few advanced tasks(like getting a physical backup using MySQL Enterprise Backup) fail because SUPER privilege is not available for the master user.
  • A few parameters are not modifiable in the parameter groups and the access to the server filesystem is not given. This should not be the case because as an advanced user, you might want to understand things a little deeper.
For a general-purpose workload, RDS is a perfect fit and works really well and takes care of a lot of stuff for you (replication, security, monitoring, scaling, storage, publishing logs to CloudWatch). If you have a read-intensive load though, you should probably think of switching to a NoSQL database service like DocumentDB or DynamoDB.
Read Alok Patwal's full review
Erlon Sousa Pinheiro profile photo
Score 8 out of 10
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At my current organization, we are using Amazon Relational Databases as our first option databases, supporting our DevOps environment. Currently, our monitoring system (based on Zabbix) and our configuration management system (based on Puppet) are using it as the main database. In our team, all databases are being based on AWS RDS PostgreSQL so far.
  • AWS products on average, excel at high availability. RDS is a good example of that.
  • Easy scaling. Just a few clicks.
  • Load balancing in a transparent way.
  • Sometimes you can't install specific items like modules.
  • You are not able to use different DB versions from those provided by AWS.
  • AWS keeps DB logs for a short time. If you have a problem and need to check something beyond the retention period, you can't.
Using Amazon Relational Database Service you have almost everything that is needed in a database environment. High availability, backup and recovery processes are already in place, with load balancing, updates and so on. For sure your demands for a DBA will be smaller than if you had an on-premises environment since most of the job is performed by AWS. Just have on mind that you will have to expand your knowledge to cover some specific aspects of a cloud database environment.
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Bob Smith profile photo
Score 10 out of 10
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Our organization runs lean, and as a small business that means that each employee wears multiple hats. With Amazon Relational Database Service we are able to deploy, backup, migrate, and manage a vast array of database servers without the need for a full-time Database Administrator. Amazon makes things like failover and backups so easy, my 89-year-old grandmother could do it.
  • Deploying a new database server can be achieved and configured in minutes.
  • Backups are automatically scheduled, and can be as easy as a few button clicks.
  • Failover on Multi-AZ Instances works like magic.
  • Security is easily configured to other Amazon Services and the outside world.
  • It would be nice if the Storage of an instance could auto-scale.
  • Accessing the server logs is something I've struggled with, as I don't have physical access to the server.
  • It would be nice if snapshots could be exported from RDS.
Amazon Relational Database Service (Amazon RDS) is great for any relational database installation. If you are starting a new project you might even benefit from their Free Tier for the first year of using the service. But what really helps me is that it allows anyone to set up a production environment, and helps you manage backups and failover so your customers won't be caught unaware when there is an outage.
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Score 10 out of 10
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Amazon Web Services Relational Database Service (RDS) is being used as our production data store running MySQL. We use it to store user information, click information, billing information. Additionally, we have a separate instance running PostgreSQL and storing some of our proprietary objects used to emit streams for our core business model.
  • Managed - RDS is entirely managed for us
  • Scalable - It is incredibly easy to scale an RDS instance
  • Support - AWS support is top-notch
  • Since RDS is managed, you are never truly a superuser, you just have admin privileges.
  • Lack of direct access to MySQL files and whatnot.
  • Downtime is scheduled on their schedule rather than yours.
Any production database needs could benefit from Amazon Relation Database Service. You can pick any engine you want, and it is entirely managed for you. It is especially good for small teams who do not have or cannot afford a database administrator. It has been useful in that way for us.
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Score 10 out of 10
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We use AWS RDS service for multiple applications as a backend for MySQL Databases. It helped us in updating MySQL versions, backups, and snapshots. We don't have to spend time managing and maintaining infrastructure, and we spent the most time on business. We can choose or readjust capacity based on demands and also automatic backups stored on S3 bucket.
  • Automatic updates.
  • We can scale the resources.
  • 99% availability.
  • It needs some basic aws console experience to set up RDS.
We use AWS RDS service for multiple applications as a back-end for MySQL Databases. It is well suited for all companies, including small to enterprise. It does not suit if your application has only a static website or fewer backed services.
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Score 8 out of 10
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Amazon Relational Database Service is used to host databases accessed by web applications that are on servers hosted within AWS EC2. There is also a database hosted in RDS used by end-user desktop applications.
  • As with all AWS services, it is fast and easy to get set up.
  • It integrates well with the rest of your infrastructure hosted within AWS.
  • The point in time backup/restore options work well.
  • There are use cases where you have to delete and recreate your entire database instance just to change one thing.
  • SQL Server backup and restore to file is not a simple GUI-driven process.
  • Read replicas are not offered for Microsoft SQL databases.
If you have the rest of your infrastructure in AWS, it is easiest to use Relational Database Service for your databases rather than build out your own servers in EC2. The server maintenance, clusters, etc. are all done for you, and you have technical support you can call rather than having to troubleshoot everything yourself.
If you have non-Microsoft databases, you have the ability to set up read replicas so your database writes are not slowed down.
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Score 10 out of 10
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We use Amazon RDS across our organization to provide website data and data for applications used internally. It allows us to have fully managed MySQL and PostgreSQL instances at our disposal without the headache of maintaining backups and doing minor upgrades manually or setting up redundancy.
  • Amazon RDS handles database backups for you and allows you to rollback if needed. This is beneficial because we do not have to take the time to set up and manage our own backup schedule.
  • Amazon RDS allows full access control via Security Groups. This is vital to ensure the security of our data.
  • With Amazon RDS, we have monitoring capabilities that allow us to trigger actions. This is important because we are not always watching our RDS instance health 24/7.
  • Amazon RDS could possibly make the major upgrade process easier somehow.
  • Amazon RDS has been an exceptional product in my eyes, so I find it very hard to think of areas it needs to improve.
Amazon Relational Database Service is well suited for environments where fully managed relational databases are required or desired. With Amazon RDS you can know that your database instance is being monitored, updated, and backed up, and is in good hands. It's great to be able to sleep well at night.
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Score 7 out of 10
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We have been using AWS RDS with MySQL for internal as well as production level since 2014. Amazon RDS is the best option to host relational databases. We are using AWS RDS to support our web service and website solution for the client, which exceeds 1+ million hits over a month.
  • High availability and scalability with HIPPA compliance for sensitive data.
  • Great interactive console and configuration option.
  • Great availability of cloud watch triggers.
  • Very fast and easy to create a backup and restore.
  • It's a little bit complex for new users to understand all configurations.
  • Security group creation and maintenance is time-consuming.
  • Costly for small organizations.
Amazon RDS is the best suitable solution if you want to store sensitive data in the cloud with high availability and scalability of the database. Cost is a major concern. If your organization is financially small, then only you have to search for another solution.
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Score 8 out of 10
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Amazon Relational Database Service is used by our Development team to centrally host data that our customers create using our application. Our customers are all within North America. Our application can use either MySQL or Amazon's Aurora, interchangeably. Amazon's RDS tools allowed us to quickly move from a distributed application with local databases on each customer's PC, to a SaaS model with multi-tenancy.
  • Console is very intuitive, allowing new users to figure out what is possible without having to search documentation to do each and everything.
  • Seamless upgrade process from MySQL to Aurora.
  • Easy restore process from automated or manual backups.
  • Leverages aspects/services also used by EC2 and other AWS services to implement security and balancing.
  • Unclear on pricing while choosing instance resource levels, must browse to a separate calculator instead of just displaying it on the page in real time with the selected options.
  • Must pick from pre-configured resources(CPU & RAM) per instance class, while GCP allows you to adjust resources to whatever level desired.
  • Has some restrictions on what configuration adjustments can be made to the server when compared to other hosting options.
Great for anyone just getting started with hosted RDS, and looks to have the price advantage as well. Leveraging other AWS services are very helpful, so as not to have to learn different configurations/tools to adjust RDS vs EC2, etc.
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Score 9 out of 10
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We started recently using Amazon Relational Database service in our company. We are exploring the usage and trying to utilize it at the maximum level. Still we are in the learning phase. Presently we are using Amazon Relational Database service in building reports, Analyzing the data in different ways. As I said earlier still we are in the learning phase as of now we are in good shape.
  • Data storage and retrieval of data at high speed.
  • Able to store a huge amount of data.
  • Analyzing of data became more accurate.
  • Price is a little high
  • Multi-Master replication
  • Storage capacity needs to increase
Amazon Relational Database is easy to Set up, Use and debug. Automatic patch is very good. Amazon Relational Database provides good security and it's configured very well. The timely backup is also too good in reality. Multi-tasking can be improved and the amount of data storage in one file needs to improve.
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Gabriel Samaroo profile photo
Score 10 out of 10
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My organization uses Amazon Relational Database Service (RDS) to manage all of its Databases. The nice thing about RDS is you don't need to have a traditional Database Administrator on staff. Creating an instance of any of the many Database offerings (MySQL, Postgres, etc.) is as easy as a push of a button, and all the complexities around managing your data become very simple.
  • End-to-end management of your database -- including configuration, handling security, and maintenance.
  • Offers compatibility with many (and the most popular) database technologies -- including but not limited to MySQL, Postgres, Microsoft SQL Server, Oracle DB.
  • Makes backups and replications very easy, which is one of the toughest things to do effectively.
  • The logging options aren't as good as you would have if you managed your database yourself.
  • Restricted rights and permissions. Because you are using a managed service, you don't have 100% of all the capabilities you would traditionally have when managing a database yourself.
  • Because you are using a managed service, that's meant to do a lot for you and make things easy, you are paying a premium price. Some tasks are very simple (for even standard software developers, not even for a DBA). If you don't need to scale and aren't in a rush, the price might not be worth it.
Amazon Relational Database Service is great when you need a Database solution that can work for you very fast. It is also a great solution when you need a system that can scale to handle very large amounts of data. You can get set up with a complex, large database eco-system in minutes/hours, and have the best security and backups scheduled. The alternative to doing this would typically be hiring one or more very experienced database professionals for not just the implementation, but also on staff to handle the periodic maintenance necessary.
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Kyle Reichelt profile photo
Score 9 out of 10
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My organization has, since the beginning, utilized RDS as our transactional, day-to-day database, at first staging all incoming data in a PostgreSQL. Although it has performed so well that it now handles all of our data warehousing and has handled our heaviest queries with enviable aplomb. We had initially staged data in RDS for migration into Redshift, but have determined that running well-optimized queries on our particular volume of data--certainly not the petabytes that would justify Redshift--our PostrgreSQL database on RDS is actually more performant.
  • Security... being in the AWS stack, you get all the "warm and fuzzies" that come with knowing your data is secure. And user management couldn't be easier.
  • Flexibility... Aurora, PostreSQL, MySQL, Oracle, SQL Server--RDS can run any of them.
  • Scalability... when all else fails, add more hardware! To a point... and there is a point (see: petabytes) at which you might consider bumping up to RedShift, but for the other 99.99%, RDS is the place to be.
  • My engineers would be able to speak more thoroughly to the cons. I have only benefited from the fruit of their labor. I can say that, from a Project Management standpoint (interfacing with RDS via a PostgreSQL client and my dashboards), it has only performed well so far.
RDS is well suited if:
  1. You have a modest budget. If I were completely bootstrapped and not married to AWS, I might look elsewhere.
  2. You need a speedy, secure transactional, do-it-all database.
  3. You need the ability to scale seamlessly.
Read Kyle Reichelt's full review
Dylan Cauwels profile photo
Score 9 out of 10
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Amazon RDS is a great service for managing all of your relational database services in a simple manner. In our shift to data analytics and a cloud infrastructure for our applications, RDS was invaluable in providing consistent backend support for all of our applications, both small and large. Its ability to quickly hook up to any existing AWS infrastructure and replicate itself across multiple AZs meant that we could quickly adjust the availability and cost efficiency of an application's database as it scaled.
  • Scalable to infinity. If you want scalable infrastructure, RDS will provide it for you in droves. You automatically launch across multiple AZs to ensure failover solutions, and can choose to launch additional read replicas or database snapshots to ensure snappy reads and data availability.
  • Allows you to focus on the application instead of managing a database. While this leads to tradeoffs in your control of the database, it allows a reduced DB management team and can ensure an application can get off the ground as soon as possible.
  • You do have a lack of control when it comes to the minutiae of database management. Replication topology, SUPER privilege, direct access to data directories and logs are all restricted with RDS making it harder for the experienced RDS sysadmin to run their system.
  • Availability reduced in some ways to make other options easier. The only feasible method is multi-AZ deployment for replication and planned downtime makes it hard to keep a running application at times
  • Lack of access to the professional tools of RDS systems means that you have reduced insight into how your system is performing.
Best for simple to moderately complex database solutions that will keep running with minimal oversight. Bad for complex database solutions that the sysadmin wants to keep a detailed eye on and wants access to all the available tools of an RDS system. Data will be safe under the RDS umbrella if you implement it right, which is something that can be learned in a 2 hour class on AWS.
Read Dylan Cauwels's full review
Dhruba Jyoti Nag profile photo
Score 8 out of 10
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Currently, Amazon RDS is used as a data store for all the micro-services in my organization. It is particularly suitable because, in a very loosely coupled micro-services landscape, none of the services need a complex table structure and limited data redundancy is tolerated. Hence, a medium instance of RDS is more than capable of servicing our production-grade micro-services without the maintenance cost of an on-premise RDBMS.
  • It is scalable and fault tolerant.
  • It is provided as a managed service without the need for an on premise data center.
  • It is highly capable and a fast enough data source for a production-grade lightweight microservice.
  • It is not suitable for a very complex database where every performance aspect of a database needs to be granularly fine-tuned.
  • Adopters have to take care of data security.
  • It is not suitable for analytics.
It is very well suited as a small data store for lightweight micro-services where there is no need for a complex table structure and database objects. It is not very well suited for applications which perform analytics on a large volume of data in a short span of time and, hence, require a very high throughput.
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Score 8 out of 10
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Amazon RDS is our core database platform. It is used for both development and production loads, throughout the company. RDS provides us with a full-featured database without the cost of managing the server or installation.
  • Hands-off managed service allows us to focus on how we use the database and not managing the database.
  • Multiple database choices provide us with the ability to choose the best product for the intended use case.
  • Automated snapshots take the pain out of disaster recovery.
  • RDS databases are not encrypted by default, so you have to remember to add encryption when you set it up.
Amazon RDS is a perfect choice for most database scenarios. The combination of high-quality database software and a very hands-off approach to management makes Amazon RDS worth checking out. Advanced features allowing redundancy and disaster recovery make this a perfect choice for production loads.
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Score 8 out of 10
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We are using Amazon Relational Database Service to provide various managed database clusters, enabling us to have our data replicated to multiple availability zones, in addition to nightly backups, and managed updates without downtime. Since Amazon Relational Database Service supports MySQL and MariaDB, we are able to use RDS without changes to our platform, removing vendor lock-in.
  • Redundency
  • Managed Updates
  • Security
  • Unified billing
  • Unable to run custom software on RDS servers
  • Customer support is lackluster
  • Price
Amazon Relational Database Service is best for situations where you need to use a MariaDB or MySQL Database, but do not want to spend time setting up and securing the server/software. Amazon Relational Database Service manages all of this for you, so it is very easy to get up and running and have an enterprise-ready environment ready for use.
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Score 10 out of 10
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We use RDS to run all the databases to run our platform for both OLTP and analytics/reporting purposes. This includes traditional PostgresSQL Aurora PostgeSQL. and Aurora MySQL implementations.
  • RDS provides high availability databases without having to manage your own servers.
  • Amazon Aurora in particular is a breakthrough database technology, and in particular with the PostgreSQL engine provides advanced features at a fraction of the cost of an Oracle implementation, with better features that have been designed from the ground up to support the cloud.
  • Aurora also allows supports large clusters of database servers easily, with super fast replication (~20 ms), and flexibility to allow changing resources provisioned based on workload.
  • Cross-Region replication is supported for most platforms and engines, but is not available across the board yet. Where it is available it provides an excellent solution for disaster recovery.
If you want to run a database in the cloud, RDS is definitely the way to go. I have not come across any scenarios that would indicate a better option.
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Arjun Komath profile photo
Score 8 out of 10
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Amazon RDS is one of the primary data stores for all applications in our organisation. We also use AWS DynamoDB, Elastic Search, Redis etc apart from RDS. We preferred RDS over other DBaaS because it's a part of AWS which is highly reliable and scalable, and it is a completely managed solution which is simple, easy to use and also offers advanced features required by DevOps team.
  • Zero manual configuration, you can get an instance up and running in just 5 minutes.
  • High scalability (RDS simplifies setting up master-slave cluster) and reliability (Multi AZ replications).
  • Automatic backups so that we don't have to worry about losing data.
  • Hard to debug performance issues at times since it is a managed service and we don't have all privileges.
RDS removes the headache of maintaining and monitoring database instances, we do not have to worry about replication, backup and restore, updating the database etc as it's fully managed by AWS. So if you want to focus more on building the actual software rather than worrying about the infrastructure, RDS is a highly recommended.
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Score 10 out of 10
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Our company has a cloud-first and AWS first strategy that includes creating and moving databases to the public cloud. We started this journey seriously about 2 years ago and have decided to use RDS services as often as possible, instead of using EC2 instances for our database environments. While our footprint in the public cloud is still a small part of our overall compute, we are finding that RDS is meeting our database needs are we are migrating and creating new ones. RDS is not only solving issues for the operations of our business, we are also using RDS as part of our overall data lake strategy.
  • Getting the data in and out of our databases, especially with the close integration RDS has with S3 buckets.
  • Less overall management of the database servers. Our DBAs are now do more DBA work than server admin work, which moves them higher on the value chain.
  • Performance and Scalability.
  • Some of the RDS (like Redshift) still lack a SQL programming language like t-SQL, but are getting better all the time.
  • Depending on the database chosen, pricing is still dictated by the vendor like Oracle or SQL-server.
  • For problem deep in the system, not having machine access can be problematic.
Redshift RDS - Data Lakes and Data Warehouses
Aurora RDS - nice alternative to mySQL or Postgres, but skill the performance and features of those other engines
DynamoDB RDS - scalability and flexibility like other no-SQL database
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Justin Schroeder profile photo
Score 8 out of 10
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We use amazon RDS to offload database systems from the primary server stack. This is particularly useful for us in 2 scenarios:

1. You are running server clusters and the database needs to be external to those clusters for consistency.
2. You are operating some shared services and need to sandbox a particular set of data or application.
  • It's quite easy to set up and provision new RDS instances.
  • Setting up multi-zone failover tolerant databases is literally just a couple mouse clicks.
  • Databases are automatically backed up and have minor version upgrades applied.
  • Set and forget.
  • We have at times dealt with a few latency issues between RDS and our server instances even when they are in the same zone. This isn't a big deal if you're appropriately caching, but if you were to run a CMS, say Drupal, without caching on RDS from an EC2 instance it could be quite a bit slower than using a single box.
  • Occasionally Amazon will depreciate a particular version and you are forced to "do some work" to migrate your database in a time period you may not have anticipated. Not sure there is any way around this for anybody, but it's a thing to think about.
Reach for amazon RDS if you're looking to offload your database to an dedicated server. This is really important for just about any database-backed system that relies on multiple server instances. If you can afford it, it's also a good solution for simply running a database instead of co-locating one on your application server because it takes so much of the guesswork out of management.
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Dharma raju profile photo
Score 8 out of 10
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RDS manages replication if databases are in multiple-avaliable zones.
  • Easy to handle master and slave nodes
  • Synchronization of data between the instances
  • Easy to administrate with AWS console
  • RDS is much more expensive than MySQL+EC2.
It is less appropriate if you enjoy headaches and tuning every last little bit for maximum performance.
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Score 9 out of 10
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We use Amazon RDS as the backing data store for our various microservices as well as the utilities that manage service scheduling and system availability. Our primary databases are configured with Postgres, but our management utilities use MySQL under the hood. In production, we also use a high-availability configuration with automated failover to a backup system. This is all to say we use RDS extensively in our organization and the reliability of the platform provides both us and our customers with piece of mind.
  • Multiple availability zones for high assurance of uptime
  • Both hosted and local management/reporting utilities
  • Integration with CloudWatch and CloudFormation for automated creation and real-time performance metrics
  • Postgres, in particular, is configured in such a way as to prevent access to the `postgres` user. Considering things like database extensions are installed under this user, if extensions ever need to be removed/modified, you have to rebuild and migrate your entire database!
  • Cross-system database migrations are somewhat slow and, in many cases, require a great deal of manual work to ensure data type information (i.e. UUIDs or Integers) is properly set-post migration (otherwise many types are re-cast to strings).
Amazon RDS is well suited if you need a highly-available, cloud-hosted, scalable database for websites or web applications. It can grow to serve as many queries as you need (at a cost) and is easy to configure. That being said, RDS can get expensive quickly depending on your use. If you're hosting a simple website or blog, it would be cheaper to stand up a database inside the EC2 instance powering the application. If you're not working with a lot of data, RDS can potentially be overkill for your needs.
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Corwin Cole profile photo
Score 10 out of 10
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Amazon RDS holds and manages data for our core operations. We accept somewhat sensitive data: PII, but nothing PCI-protected. The well-vetted security of the service, along with its outstanding configurability, make it a perfect option for maintaining trust with our clients. RDS easily upgrades when we need to scale and was seemingly built with the expectation that it would fit neatly into an event-driven architecture. Automatic backups, read replication, everything is exceptional. I'm trying to think of a complaint or drawback, but I can't.
  • RDS received provisional FedRAMP-High Authorization in January of 2017. When our clients ask us how our data is encrypted and secured, we mention that it's encrypted at rest on Amazon RDS, and that (so far) has instantly established trust in every instance.
  • RDS makes everything easy - automatic backups, encryption at rest (above a certain service tier), ultra-fast upgrades, and excellent configurations for event hooks and logging.
  • RDS is impressively fast and available. Our RDS instance literally has never had a failure or problem of any kind.
  • It's really hard to think of any areas for improvement. I think the console could maybe use a simpler interface or walkthrough for newer users who know what they want, but are unfamiliar with the technical terminology.
  • It would be great to be able to automatically spawn a lower-tier RDS instance for staging and development environments, mirroring the functionality of the higher-tier production environment but minimizing costs.
  • Because DynamoDB is not encrypted at rest (yet), it would be really nice to see more documentation about creating simple, semi-serverless applications with an RDS-Lambda-API Gateway setup.
RDS is outstanding for sensitive data, e.g. user credentials and PII, because you can get excellent encryption at rest and security features for relatively little expense. For simple data structures and relationships, I highly recommend RDS. For more complex and intricately interrelated structures, DynamoDB is probably a better offering, but its lack of at-rest encryption makes it inappropriate for credentials, PII, etc.

RDS also integrates extremely well with ElasticBeanstalk, Lambda, and so on, and has functionality to trigger and/or respond to events from other AWS services, such as SQS.
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Anudeep Palanki profile photo
Score 10 out of 10
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As a part of the shift in the organization from moving away from Oracle to open-source systems, we started developing micro services. The micro service architecture emphasizes on small sized databases and APIs that control access to the data. So in the pre-micro service era where we have one monolith DB that's managed by Infrastructure teams, the new architecture demands new DBs. Traditionally speaking, spawning new robust and production ready databases used to be difficult. For developers, it involves procurement of hardware, connecting it to the network, installing new DB software, setting up robust backup scripts for the data; which is a lot of work. Amazon RDS offers SaaS to replace the above work, making it super easy for a developer to spawn a new instance by filling up a short form and clicking a button.
  • Making it super easy to spin up new instances. It's as simple as filling up a form and clicking a button.
  • RDS offers a catalog of popular databases to choose from. This provides options for companies that have code that's strongly coupled with a database and for developers to try new databases to solve a problem.
  • RDS takes care of creating backup scripts and multi zoning your data for making the database robust.
  • RDS ties really well into the rest of Amazon's security model, making the data secure.
  • Currently RDS does not offer a No-SQL DB management through RDS. They have their DynamoDB offering for No-SQL, but I wish RDS offers popular No-SQL DB's like MongoDB in their offerings.
  • RDS does not provide access to the Virtual Machine. It provides access to the database instance but not to the VM that Database resides in. This is kind of a nice to have as it would allow for fine grained performance tuning of the DB.
  • Unifying RDS security by combining instance security model with AWS IAM model. Currently to manage an RDS instance you have to have two security models in place, one, to secure access to RDS through IAM and the other to secure access to the Database through the Database's own security.
RDS would be an excellent fit if:
  • The database you are looking for is offered in RDS catalog.
  • Have rest of the systems tied up with the AWS.
RDS would not be a great fit if:
  • The database is not offered in Catalog
  • You need to be up-to-date with the latest versions of the DB.
  • You need to customize the database by installing plugins thats not offered by version on RDS.
  • You need to customize the database in any other manner.
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Valeri Karpov profile photo
Score 10 out of 10
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Amazon Relational Database Service (RDS) hosts a Postgres instance that we send our production MongoDB data into. We then use metabase (http://www.metabase.com/) on top of RDS for analytics. MongoDB hosts all our production data and is the source of truth, but we copy that data into RDS because most of our non-technical staff are not proficient with MongoDB's aggregation framework and because we don't want to risk an errant query hurting our production database's performance.
  • Quick and easy hosting for SQL databases. Setting up Postgres locally is a nightmare and we don't have experience managing it, RDS has made it easy.
  • Easy to set up tools like MySQL to pipe your real production data into RDS.
  • Gives you a nice neat Postgres URI that you can point metabase, wagon, etc., at for analytics.
  • RDS is expensive compared to running a self-hosted SQL database on EC2 (once you get past the generous free tier). Currently the cheapest on-demand RDS instance costs $0.041 / hour, whereas EC2 t1.nano instances cost $0.006 / hour. $29/mo seems expensive given that we have no need for blazing performance or multi-availability-zone durability.
  • I don't believe traditional RDBMS have any business being production databases in this day and age, so I find RDS' focus on performance and durability to be wasteful and distracting.
  • Like most AWS products, the documentation is exceptionally complex and difficult to navigate, and the UI displays an awful lot of superfluous information.
I think RDS is a great solution for hosting an SQL analytics database if you're not big enough to justify using Redshift and want to avoid Redshift's limitations. Getting set up is pretty easy once you've digested the somewhat unclear documentation, and I've had no complaints about the service's reliability. Setting up and managing Postgres is a nightmare, so I was thrilled that Amazon could do it for me. However, I wouldn't trust it to run your production data, because I wouldn't recommend a relational database for running your production in general.
Read Valeri Karpov's full review

About Amazon RDS

Amazon Relational Database Service (Amazon RDS) is a database-as-a-service (DBaaS) from Amazon Web Services.

Amazon RDS Technical Details

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