What users are saying about
5 Ratings
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Score 8.5 out of 100
43 Ratings
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Score 9.3 out of 100

Attribute Ratings

  • FreeBSD is rated higher in 1 area: Likelihood to Recommend

Likelihood to Recommend

10.0

FreeBSD

100%
1 Rating
9.0

SUSE Linux Enterprise Server

90%
12 Ratings

Usability

FreeBSD

N/A
0 Ratings
8.0

SUSE Linux Enterprise Server

80%
1 Rating

Support Rating

FreeBSD

N/A
0 Ratings
8.7

SUSE Linux Enterprise Server

87%
4 Ratings

Likelihood to Recommend

Open Source

FreeBSD is an excellent choice to continue using older hardware and have it perform, it is a great choice for a UNIX based development environment. Although I haven't used it as a server, it is most suited for this - it would make an excellent, secure and robust server for and I would love to start using it for this as well.
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SUSE

It is well suited for an administrator team that is accustomed to pointing and clicking on items in a GUI fashion. All of the configurations can be performed this way if one chooses not to go the CLI method way. SUSE Linux works well with Microsoft environments and it's really easy to join a SUSE Linux server to an AD infrastructure as a member server and configure user authentication so that the server's resources can be accessed.
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Pros

Open Source

  • Performs really well, even on older hardware
  • Secure
  • Robust
  • Package manager (pkg) is excellent
  • Large collection of ported software from Linux
  • Documentation is excellent (FreeBSD Handbook)
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SUSE

  • Consistently performs well across various CPU architectures.
  • It's very well supported both by the parent company, as well as SAP and other third-party companies.
  • It is upgradeable across versions. We've performed upgrades from version 10 to 11 and from 11 to 12 without any major issues.
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Cons

Open Source

  • Installation can be tricky for first timers
  • You need to be comfortable using a command line terminal most of the time
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SUSE

  • The support window for service packs after a new SP is released is too short.
  • Community engagement is low.
  • There are times when supported packages fall too far behind and create compatibility issues with applications. The Open Build Service usually provides a way around this, though.
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Pricing Details

FreeBSD

Starting Price

Editions & Modules

FreeBSD editions and modules pricing
EditionModules

Footnotes

    Offerings

    Free Trial
    Free/Freemium Version
    Premium Consulting/Integration Services

    Entry-level set up fee?

    No setup fee

    Additional Details

    SUSE Linux Enterprise Server

    Starting Price

    Editions & Modules

    SUSE Linux Enterprise Server editions and modules pricing
    EditionModules

    Footnotes

      Offerings

      Free Trial
      Free/Freemium Version
      Premium Consulting/Integration Services

      Entry-level set up fee?

      No setup fee

      Additional Details

      Usability

      Open Source

      No answers on this topic

      SUSE

      For the breadth of services, features and overall performance, I believe Suse Linux is a great choice for any enterprise. It still has to grow a bit in areas like online help forums and documents, but we are pretty much satisfied with our choice.
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      Support Rating

      Open Source

      No answers on this topic

      SUSE

      It's great for basic support issues. But it's less suited for anything that is either obscure or uncommon, and it is very hard to escalate, unless you've built a relationship with your vendor/salesperson.
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      Alternatives Considered

      Open Source

      FreeBSD was the only operating system out of many I tried to install easily on older hardware and to run in a very performant way. For example, I had a lot of trouble trying to get Ubuntu to install on older hardware and when it did, it was too slow to use. FreeBSD installed quite easily and even after installing a desktop such as XFCE - it still run surprisingly fast. I was very impressed with it's performance, which it seems is a goal of the FreeBSD project.
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      SUSE

      We went straight to SLES when we initially started migrating oracle to hana since at that time, HANA came on a pre-installed server that had to be purchased from an official vendor, and SLES was the only allowed OS. We stuck with SLES after we became certified to do our own installations because so far, SLES was a good fit for us.
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      Return on Investment

      Open Source

      • As FreeBSD is free - the ROI is at least the cost of some commercial Linux or Windows based OS (which can be very expensive)
      • Allowed the re-use of older hardware that would have otherwise been disposed
      • No cost development environment
      • Opportunity for a no cost server setup also
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      SUSE

      • Compared to others, use is more stable and scalable; easy to manage.
      • The administration tools are very useful in helping the staff performance.
      • SLES proved to be a very extendable product, supporting all of our infrastructure.
      • The major reason I chose to use the product was the extensive enterprise peripheral support.
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