A Rock-Solid Operating System
December 04, 2019

A Rock-Solid Operating System

Chris Saenz | TrustRadius Reviewer
Score 8 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source

Overall Satisfaction with Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL)

RHEL is one of the primary operating systems that we implement at our organization. It's a major Linux distribution that is supported by Red Hat for enterprise customers. We use it when an application requires Linux or our users prefer RHEL to host their application. When users prefer RHEL, it is typically the first or only Linux distribution that is compatible.
  • Stable OS.
  • Release security patches quickly.
  • Compatible with many third-party applications.
  • Support has been hit or miss
  • It has proven to be a reliable operating system.
  • Allowed us to implement applications in a repeatable and efficient manner.
  • Continue operating a secure environment.
RHEL is very different than Windows, but in terms of just a simple operating system, RHEL is much more lightweight than Windows and in many cases runs more efficiently than Windows. Given the choice between the two, some application are preferable on RHEL, like Apache or Oracle. CentOS is the upstream version of RHEL, so RHEL is supposed to be not only supported (where CentOS is not) to be running more stable software, drivers, and services.
I haven't had much interaction with support, but the little I have had has been lacking. Mostly did not meet SLAs and engineers usually had to escalate to get things resolved. Took more time than it should have, in my opinion.

Do you think Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) delivers good value for the price?

Yes

Are you happy with Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL)'s feature set?

Yes

Did Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) live up to sales and marketing promises?

Yes

Did implementation of Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) go as expected?

Yes

Would you buy Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) again?

Yes

RHEL is a rock-solid server for some essential network services, such as NFS, DNS, SMTP, Apache, Tomcat, etc., in addition to running third-party applications. It may not as well suited for things like DHCP because of the lack of active directory integration. Also, if users are used to NTFS permissions backed by a domain, then running as a file share may not be as beneficial as running a Windows CIFS server.