Gradle Build Tool (Open Source) vs. Travis CI

Overview
ProductRatingMost Used ByProduct SummaryStarting Price
Gradle Build Tool (Open Source)
Score 8.9 out of 10
N/A
Gradle is an open source build system. Gradle boasts a rich API and mature ecosystem of plugins and integrations to support automation. Users can model, integrate and systematize the delivery of software from end to end.
$0
per month
Travis CI
Score 7.3 out of 10
N/A
Travis CI is an open source continuous integration platform, that enables users to run and test simultaneously on different environments, and automatically catch code failures and bugs.
$69
per month 1 concurrent job
Pricing
Gradle Build Tool (Open Source)Travis CI
Editions & Modules
No answers on this topic
1 Concurrent Job Plan
$69
per month
Bootstrap
$69
per month 1 concurrent job
2 Concurrent Jobs Plan
$129
per month
Startup
$129
per month 2 concurrent jobs
5 Concurrent Jobs Plan
$249
per month
Small Business
$249
per month 5 concurrent jobs
Premium
$489
per month 10 concurrent jobs
Platinum
$794+
per month starting at 15 concurrent jobs
Free Plan
Free
Offerings
Pricing Offerings
Gradle Build Tool (Open Source)Travis CI
Free Trial
NoYes
Free/Freemium Version
YesYes
Premium Consulting/Integration Services
NoNo
Entry-level Setup FeeNo setup feeNo setup fee
Additional DetailsDiscount available for annual pricing.
More Pricing Information
Community Pulse
Gradle Build Tool (Open Source)Travis CI
Considered Both Products
Gradle Build Tool (Open Source)

No answer on this topic

Travis CI
Chose Travis CI
There are a number of alternatives to Travis CI, but Travis remains the most popular, since it was one of the first to show up. It has a lot of examples, support for building dozens of languages, and good documentation. Significant portions of the system are open source, so you …
Top Pros

No answers on this topic

Top Cons

No answers on this topic

Best Alternatives
Gradle Build Tool (Open Source)Travis CI
Small Businesses
GitLab
GitLab
Score 8.8 out of 10
GitLab
GitLab
Score 8.8 out of 10
Medium-sized Companies
GitLab
GitLab
Score 8.8 out of 10
GitLab
GitLab
Score 8.8 out of 10
Enterprises
GitLab
GitLab
Score 8.8 out of 10
GitLab
GitLab
Score 8.8 out of 10
All AlternativesView all alternativesView all alternatives
User Ratings
Gradle Build Tool (Open Source)Travis CI
Likelihood to Recommend
9.0
(12 ratings)
6.0
(8 ratings)
Usability
10.0
(1 ratings)
5.0
(1 ratings)
Performance
3.0
(1 ratings)
-
(0 ratings)
Support Rating
9.0
(4 ratings)
4.0
(1 ratings)
User Testimonials
Gradle Build Tool (Open Source)Travis CI
Likelihood to Recommend
Open Source
Gradle Build Tool is more suitable with the Java projects. It has helped us to automate the build part of the devops cycle. Its configuration and Groovy script is really easy to understand and can be implemented with ease. It can be used both for automation and manual buids of the projects. Gradle Build Tool is easy to use and easy to integrate.
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Travis CI
TravisCI is suited for workflows involving typical software development but unfortunately I think the software needs more improvement to be up to date with current development systems and TravisCI hasn't been improving much in that space in terms of integrations.
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Pros
Open Source
  • Gradle's methods to manipulate files is very flexible. It minimizes the amount of code one has to write to copy, move, or expand zip or tar files.
  • Gradle uses Groovy, which is a Java like language. This allows for most computer engineers to come up to speed fairly quickly, for writing or maintaining gradle code.
  • Gradle also supports DSL (Domain Specific Language), which is based on Groovy. The DSL language allows engineers to automate build jobs that otherwise could be very cumbersome to maintain or modify.
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Travis CI
  • It is very simple to configure a range of environment versions and settings in a simple YAML file.
  • It integrates very well with Github, Bitbucket, or a private Git repo.
  • The Travis CI portal beautifully shows you your history and console logs. Everything is presented in a very clear and intuitive interface.
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Cons
Open Source
  • I'd like to see a way to specify how to run only certain tests in parallel, I tried this feature and for tests that involve interaction with SQL Databases sometimes I can't because of deadlocks.
  • Not sure if there is something else, gradle has been working really good for us and they are adding improvements all the time which is awesome. I used to think the performance is a deal but the latest versions are addressing this issue very well
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Travis CI
  • I think they could have a cheaper personal plan. I'd love to use Travis on personal projects, but I don't want to publish them nor I can pay $69 a month for personal projects that I don't want to be open source.
  • There is no interface for configuring repos on Travis CI, you have to do it via a file in the repo. This make configuration very flexible, but also makes it harder for simpler projects and for small tweaks in the configuration.
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Usability
Open Source
Gradle's language construct is good
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Travis CI
TravisCI hasn't had much changes made to its software and has thus fallen behind compared to many other CI/CD applications out there. I can only give it a 5 because it does what it is supposed to do but lacks product innovation.
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Performance
Open Source
I have tried to use Gradle for projects several times in the past, but there is just so much work in maintaining the build file that it quickly becomes untenable. I have been using Maven for many years, and even though the build file can be complex, it works without maintenance between releases.
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Travis CI
No answers on this topic
Support Rating
Open Source
Gradle has been an excellent tool for Android development. It has helped us create multiple versions of the app for different environments. It also takes care of all the packaging needs in the background without having to write all the code related to that. It is a no brainer to use Gradle with Android applications.
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Travis CI
After the private equity firm had bought this company the innovation and support has really gone downhill a lot. I am not a fan that they have gutted the software trying to make money from it and put innovation and product development second.
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Alternatives Considered
Open Source
[Gradle is] a more modern version of open source build tools like Ant and Maven.
Whereas the build config was XML files which were tedious and error
prone, the modern DSL usage of Groovy to write these build files is a
great advancement. Also these config files can be inherited from top
level to each associated project.
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Travis CI
Jenkins is much more complicated to configure and start using. Although, one you have done that, it's extremely powerful and full of features. Maybe many more than Travis CI. As per TeamCity, I would never go back to using it. It's also complicated to configure but it is not worth the trouble. Codeship supports integration with GitHub, GitLab and BitBucket. I've only used it briefly, but it seems to be a nice tool.
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Return on Investment
Open Source
  • In a distributed development environment, once we established a strong CI/CD model, Gradle proved to be a great choice to automate the various processes. Gradle also provides much flexibility, which is essential in today's development environment. The important benefit is that the CI/CD engineers can support development's needs quickly and reliably. This in turn supports faster testing and deployment, which generates higher ROI.
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Travis CI
  • It's improved my ability to deliver working code, increasing my development velocity.
  • It increases confidence that your own work (and those of external contributors) does not have any obvious bugs, provided you have sufficient test coverage.
  • It helps to ensure consistent standards across a team (you can integrate process elements like "go lint" and other style checks as part of your build).
  • It's zero-cost for public/open source projects, so the only investment is a few minutes setting up a build configuration file (hence the return is very high).
  • The .travis.yml file is a great way for onboarding new developers, since it shows how to bootstrap a build environment and run a build "from scratch".
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