What users are saying about

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Top Rated
129 Ratings

Amazon Web Services

310 Ratings
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Score 8.7 out of 101

AWS Lambda<a href='https://www.trustradius.com/static/about-trustradius-scoring#question3' target='_blank' rel='nofollow'>Customer Verified: Read more.</a>

Top Rated
129 Ratings
<a href='https://www.trustradius.com/static/about-trustradius-scoring' target='_blank' rel='nofollow'>trScore algorithm: Learn more.</a>
Score 8.4 out of 101

Add comparison

Likelihood to Recommend

Amazon Web Services

Amazon Web Services is well suited for companies that don't want to have deal with physical infrastructure and want a high level of security and availability. In most cases Amazon Web Services is a great option for most, but may not be an option if you have met the tipping point of physical cost vs. Amazon Web Services cost. It may end up being a better option in the long run to manage the infrastructure yourself if the cost per hour of Amazon Web Services is greater than what you can provide if your level of availability is equal to or greater than Amazon Web Services.
No photo available

AWS Lambda

Well suited if:
  • Your organization is fairly well established (see: runway)
  • You're married to AWS Infrastructure
  • You hate servers
Not well suited if:
  • You aren't utilizing AWS's manages services
  • Your organization is still in the boot-strapped stage (trying to run as lean as possible)
Kyle Reichelt profile photo

Feature Rating Comparison

Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS)

Amazon Web Services
8.4
AWS Lambda
Service-level Agreement (SLA) uptime
Amazon Web Services
8.7
AWS Lambda
Dynamic scaling
Amazon Web Services
8.9
AWS Lambda
Elastic load balancing
Amazon Web Services
9.0
AWS Lambda
Pre-configured templates
Amazon Web Services
7.7
AWS Lambda
Monitoring tools
Amazon Web Services
7.9
AWS Lambda
Pre-defined machine images
Amazon Web Services
7.9
AWS Lambda
Operating system support
Amazon Web Services
8.5
AWS Lambda
Security controls
Amazon Web Services
8.2
AWS Lambda

Platform-as-a-Service

Amazon Web Services
AWS Lambda
8.4
Ease of building user interfaces
Amazon Web Services
AWS Lambda
7.3
Scalability
Amazon Web Services
AWS Lambda
9.6
Platform management overhead
Amazon Web Services
AWS Lambda
7.7
Workflow engine capability
Amazon Web Services
AWS Lambda
8.2
Platform access control
Amazon Web Services
AWS Lambda
8.8
Services-enabled integration
Amazon Web Services
AWS Lambda
9.4
Development environment creation
Amazon Web Services
AWS Lambda
8.2
Development environment replication
Amazon Web Services
AWS Lambda
8.3
Issue monitoring and notification
Amazon Web Services
AWS Lambda
8.3
Issue recovery
Amazon Web Services
AWS Lambda
7.8
Upgrades and platform fixes
Amazon Web Services
AWS Lambda
8.8

Pros

  • AWS constantly innovates and iterates, announcing new features several times per year. Earlier this year, for example, they introduced provisioned IOPS for EBS, suddenly providing us with an inexpensive solution to a performance quandary we'd been facing.
  • AWS has provided us with access to the product owners and architects of the products we use most. In turn, those resources provided us with visibility into the product road maps. This enabled us to improve our long-term infrastructure planning, and avoid expensive features that we'd get for free later in the year.
  • AWS peremptorily lowers costs a couple of times per year. This has helped us keep our bill reasonable even as we consume more and more of the AWS services. We periodically compare the cost of AWS to the cost of moving into our colo, and every year the colo looks less and less attractive.
Marc Schriftman profile photo
  • Easy to deploy
  • Easy to integrate with DynamoDB
  • SQS Support makes it easier to monitor and integrate
  • Easy to scale
  • Pay for what you use, not idle time
  • Focus on your business logic
Chris Moyer profile photo

Cons

  • AWS has a record of occasional severe outages, which has a cascading effect on the large number of high-profile services that now run on its infrastructure. Despite the spectacular nature of these outages, it is unlikely that a self-managed data center would achieve significantly better uptime.
  • It is also the case that AWS outages can be mitigated with effective use of multiple deployment 'zones' and regions. This is something that any mission-critical application should be doing anyway as part of disaster recovery preparations.
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  • Vendor lock-in: While a basic function or microservice might be platform independent, when you start to use AWS APIs and interact with other AWS services, your microservice now relies on the AWS ecosystem
  • A bit intimidating at first, however there are a lot of resources. Amazon could offer more templates and examples though
No photo available

Likelihood to Renew

Amazon Web Services9.4
Based on 10 answers
A paradigm shift from companies like Microsoft that have made procuring and using software and license so hard. Not to mention installing, configuring and hiring folks to maintain it. AWS makes it so easy to have an enterprise infrastructure that scales up and down and very affordable
No photo available
No score
No answers yet
No answers on this topic

Usability

Amazon Web Services9.0
Based on 3 answers
The management console is the weak part of the service in my experience. It is adequate but slow.
No photo available
No score
No answers yet
No answers on this topic

Reliability and Availability

Amazon Web Services9.0
Based on 1 answer
Availability is very good, with the exception of occasional spectacular outages.
No photo available
No score
No answers yet
No answers on this topic

Performance

AWS does not provide the raw performance that you can get by building your own custom infrastructure. However, it is often the case that the benefits of specialized, high-performance hardware do not necessarily outweigh the significant extra cost and risk. Performance as perceived by the user is very different from raw throughput.
No photo available
No answers on this topic

Support

Amazon Web Services3.0
Based on 3 answers
unless you paid the premium, no support at all
No photo available
No score
No answers yet
No answers on this topic

Implementation

Amazon Web Services10.0
Based on 3 answers
The API's were very well documented and was Janova's main point of entry into the services.
Brian Lusenhop profile photo
No score
No answers yet
No answers on this topic

Alternatives Considered

We also looked at Rackspace but was attracted to AWS by the breadth of services available at comparable cost and reliability.
No photo available
There's really nothing quite like Lambda anywhere else. We've looked at running our own Lambda functions but there's too much overhead in that. Some cloud providers might offer their own alternatives to AWS Lambda but nothing can compare. The breadth of languages supported and the ease of use to get up and running is just so revolutionary.
No photo available

Return on Investment

  • I have seen people spend a lot of money just playing with AWS because they had no idea what they were doing. Pay attention, and know what you are getting into before you do anything.
  • My previous company was in the process of moving entirely to AWS, and I know it had to be cost effective because they had datacenters at over 20 locations.
Michael Timms profile photo
  • For my Alexa skills, I have no complaints. AWS Lambda functions were required to get the skills working and they haven’t failed at all.
No photo available

Pricing Details

Amazon Web Services

General
Free Trial
Free/Freemium Version
Premium Consulting/Integration Services
Entry-level set up fee?
No
Additional Pricing Details

AWS Lambda

General
Free Trial
Free/Freemium Version
Premium Consulting/Integration Services
Entry-level set up fee?
No
Additional Pricing Details