Google App Engine Reviews

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Tristan Dobbs profile photo
Score 10 out of 10
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Google App Engine is in use for nearly every internal system and tool that we have developed, as well as a large amount of systems and tools that we have developed for our customers. It is used by our development team to build integrations between systems, build web pages, build cron jobs and automation workflows, and really anything else we need.

Our internal IT team uses it to deploy other systems like a Grab and Go program for Chromebooks (open sourced) and time approval mechanisms.
  • Extremely low cost option for web page deployment. It so simple to prototype or even offer a service by using your favourite app servering platform like Django, Flask, etc.
  • Incredible scaling. App Engine scales up and down with ease, automatically, and never fails to serve your app.
  • Ease of deployment. Google documentation is clear and concise, plus it's extremely extensible. It's easy to learn how to do this!
  • Support. It's not frequent at all that we reach out with support questions, but it is sometimes hard to get answers.
  • Roadmap visibility. Transitions and deprecations are hard to track and therefore may be hard to plan for!
App Engine is such a good resource for our team both internally and externally. You have complete control over your app, how it runs, when it runs, and more while Google handles the back-end, scaling, orchestration, and so on. If you are serving a tool, system, or web page, it's perfect.

If you are serving something back-end, like an automation or ETL workflow, you should be a little considerate or careful with how you are structuring that job. For instance, the Standard environment in Google App Engine will present you with a resource limit for your server calls. If your operations are known to take longer than, say, 10 minutes or so, you may be better off moving to the Flexible environment (which may be a little more expensive but certainly a little more powerful and a little less limited) or even moving that workflow to something like Google Compute Engine or another managed service.
Read Tristan Dobbs's full review
Jonah Dempcy profile photo
Score 10 out of 10
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We use Google App Engine for content distribution of digital publishing assets as well as analytics and authentication services for a wide array of platforms. The whole organization uses Google App Engine in some capacity or another. The business problems it addresses are virtualizing services and abstracting away server configuration, load balancing, software updates and everything else we would have to do to set up the same infrastructure on a classic web server stack. Google App Engine has expedited our development and deployment processes tremendously so we can continue innovating with new services, getting them up and running quickly, while trusting that our existing services are running on a rock solid cloud platform backend.
  • Quick to develop, quick to deploy. You can be up and running on Google App Engine in no time.
  • Flexible. We use Java for some services and Node.js for others.
  • Great security features. We have been consistently impressed with the security and authentication features of Google App Engine.
  • Documentation does not always keep up with the latest changes to the service. Google App Engine has undergone a lot of changes these past couple of years. At times, we were surprised to find out that something we didn't think was possible was, or, conversely, something that was supposed to work fine which had been deprecated. We also ended up using some undocumented features and weren't sure whether they would keep working or not.
  • Price. Google App Engine isn't cheap. But, you get what you pay for. Rock solid service, great tools, at a hefty price.
  • Difficult to tell how to optimize costs. We racked up the expenses and it is still a mystery where all the costs are being incurred.
  • Some intimidating or arcane aspects of configuration. Most of it was a breeze but every now and then something would be pretty far out and require a few of us developers putting our heads together to figure it out.
  • Sometimes required reading source code to figure out how to do something. Not a ton of examples of how to do various things, nor Stack Overflow posts, at least in the beginning. I imagine this will change as the community grows. But sometimes it felt like we were all alone trying to figure out how to do things.
Google App Engine is great if you want to rapidly build and deploy web services and you have the money to spend. It's also great if you have a team of developers, or at least 2 or 3, so if you get stuck then you have multiple people looking into it and trying to figure out how to proceed. It is less well-suited to a small startup looking to save cash, or to an individual developer who may get stuck on something and be totally blocked for days or weeks.
Read Jonah Dempcy's full review
Zachary Yaro profile photo
Score 7 out of 10
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I enjoy using Google App Engine because it allows me to focus on developing applications while GAE handles hosting and scaling.
  • Multiple backend frameworks to choose from
  • Reasonable pricing and generous free quotas
  • Scalability
  • Not every language/framework is supported
  • Certain APIs have somewhat lower quotas
  • Google can choose to deprecate features at any time
Google App Engine (GAE) is great if you already want to work in a supported language, such as Python, and you do not want to worry about how your application will scale. It is less suited to an app where you want to use a more customized set of frameworks, an unsupported language, or a custom database solution—though Google Compute Engine can meet some of those needs. It is also obviously not a good choice if you want tight control over your servers.
Read Zachary Yaro's full review
Darshan YS profile photo
Score 5 out of 10
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It is used to develop and host web applications. It is very helpful in its versatility.
  • Monitoring and operations.
  • Backups.
  • SSL security.
  • Price.
  • No multi-threading.
Google App Engine is a very good app engine application for mid scale web applications whereas its a bit pricy for small applications for constant load applications and less powerful for largescale applications. The price point can be altered a little to increase the market in the small scale segment of the application.
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Stephen Groat profile photo
Score 8 out of 10
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Google App Engine is a managed Serverless Platform that easy allows users to create managed serverless platforms with just code. Instead of having to manage servers as well, the complexity is simplified so that the code and the application become the focus. The Engineering department has found uses for the application to minimize maintenance overhead.
  • Minimizing maintenance overhead
  • Multiple languages supported
  • Decouples need for platform support knowledge and experience
  • Less configurability than conventional infrastructure based solutions
  • Creates vendor lock-in with platform specific options and tuning
  • Limited points of presence when compared with Amazon Web Services (AWS)
Google App Engine (GAE) is a platform for serverless deployments that is great for first time cloud users. Google Cloud Platform (GCP) is a great "first cloud" product, and GAE continues this trend by being easy to configure and get running quickly. Infrastructure as Code (IaC) features are also available, making enterprise deployments possible.
Read Stephen Groat's full review
Joshua Dickson profile photo
August 18, 2019

App Engine Review!

Score 9 out of 10
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App Engine is a fantastic service for developers who want to be able to run their code in an environment that they do not have to provision -- there is no manual server configuration or maintenance, etc, and all the developer needs to be concerned about is how their code works.
  • Removes the need for manual server configuration, management, orchestration, etc
  • Interfaces incredibly well with other GCP services, like Cloud Functions and Firebase
  • It is not the most cost-efficient hosting provider and could continue to improve from a cost basis
  • Google's UI can be confusing for newcomers when managing an App Engine deployment
App Engine is well suited to customers who want to use Google Cloud as their primary cloud service and is similar in role to Elastic Beanstalk from AWS and App Service from Azure. It's particularly suited to developers with standard needs (e.g. nothing so sophisticated that manual server management would be necessary) who value the simplicity over deeper customizability.
Read Joshua Dickson's full review
Dmitry Sadovnychyi profile photo
Score 10 out of 10
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It serves all our traffic to end users, which is basically one of the most important things for our organization.
  • Serving traffic to end users. It can scale automatically when traffic spikes.
  • The standard environment has some limitations, but it encourages you to write "scalable" code.
  • With Flexible Environment, you can serve any Docker container you want, still taking advantage of auto scaling.
  • Easy integration with other Google Cloud products, e.g. Datastore, Pub/Sub, Cloud Storage, etc.
  • Flexible environment needs scaling to zero and support for all APIs available in Standard Environment like ndb for Python and Task Queue.
  • Standard Environment needs to update some outdated libraries like lxml for Python.
  • Instance pricing of Standard Environment could be lowered, since it wasn't updated for many years.
It's a good use case to use App Engine when you need to serve traffic to large amount of users, but you should avoid doing any computation on it. It's better to use Compute Engine or Dataflow to process your data. It has a free tier so it's very useful for non-yet-existing startups.
Read Dmitry Sadovnychyi's full review
Hil Liao profile photo
Score 10 out of 10
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We are currently evaluating Google App engine as a platform as a service to our customers. The Google App Engine cloud endpoints is equivalent to Microsoft Azure's web apps or API apps. We are impressed with its ability to deploy Java or Python based RestFul API directly to Cloud endpoints. I coded the logic in the RestFul API to access Google's Cloud DataStore (kind-entity-property type of data store). Google's SDK made it easy to integrate its App Engine with its storage solutions. I have not tried its Cloud Bigtable from Cloud endpoints but I'm sure it's on our next task list.

Google App Engine's primary programming language is Java. I tried JetBrain's IntelliJ IDEA for managing Google App engine cloud endpoint projects. I used the community edition, which had less support for Google App Engine Cloud endpoint. The enterprise edition should have better support.

For those who prefer to use Python, JetBrains may have just released PyCharm for $99. Nothing comes for free. If you work at a company that has those licenses, you should feel lucky. Having a good IDE is critical to productivity. It has a "PyCharm Free Educational (Classroom) License" for free.

  • Auto scale application load.
  • Platform as a Service feature abstracts the web server layer.
  • Perfect for Android or iOS app server logic development.
  • Connect to different Google storage types.
  • Able to use C# as the programming language in its SDK.
  • Integration with Visual studio C# for using Google app engine cloud endpoint SDK.
  • Documentation on choosing a IDE to get started. Doing things in the command line is too basic. It's good to know them but having a sophisticated IDE is the next step to achieve higher productivity.
  • What kind of data store do you plan to use for your server side application? Make sure Google App Engine SDK supports them.
  • Will your server applications be REST based? Think about using cloud endpoint.
  • Do you plan to use a JSP page with servlet class?
Read Hil Liao's full review
Hung Vu profile photo
Score 8 out of 10
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Verified User
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We use Google App Engine as a deployment platform for our applications which are written in Java and PHP and consume other Google services such as Cloud Datastore, Google Cloud SQL. With Google App Engine we just define App.yaml, run the G Cloud app CLI command to deploy, configure and upload our application so our developers can focus on their application code and do not need to care about the server, deployment, and dependency. Google App Engine has an autoscale feature to increase or decrease resources depending on our application traffic and hardware consumption to keep our application high availability and [to maintain the] best performance while keeping costs low.

  • Easy to integrate with other Google services such as Datastore, Database...
  • Allow us to create our own dashboard and monitor our application running in Google App Engine
  • Requires little effort for configuration of our application and has a very simple deployment process
  • Good documentation and easy to find support from the community
  • Very stable and easy to scale up and down our resources
  • It does not provide full-text search API
  • It is hard to deploy multiple applications in the same Google App Engine services
With Google App Engine we do not need to be concerned about the underlying infrastructure such as creating and maintaining the server, scaling up and down, and the deployment process. So it is well suited for applications that use a standard stack or if your application needs to interact with other Google services. When we need a more flexible and customizable server we need other services such as Google Virtual Machine.
Read Hung Vu's full review
No photo available
October 28, 2019

Good Service

Score 9 out of 10
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Google App Engine (GAE) as part of the Google Cloud Platform (GCP) is being used across our entire SaaS product. It provides us with an enterprise level infrastructure that can be scaled as our business needs demand very quickly and easily. By not having to build and maintain our own on premise servers, it allows us to focus on our product rather than infrastructure.
  • Scale - we can scale instances up/down based on business needs allowing us to meet demand without wasting money for extra capacity
  • Cloud Task Queues
  • Documentation - The documentation across the board is lacking and often times out of date or just plain wrong.
  • Standard instances could provide better support for more tech stacks so that flex and/or custom instances are not required.
Google App Engine is especially well suited for situations where there is a variable workload during the day, e.g. inbound task processing with task queues. In this situation queues can be setup with parameters governing the process speed/scaling which allows you to easily balance performance with cost and meet a good balance.
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Score 9 out of 10
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We use Google App Engine to house many of our mission-critical web applications with zero downtime. It solves the need to have 100% uptime with no added long term equipment costs and additional IT support staff.
  • Ease to deploy.
  • Flexible ability to scale to meet increases in users.
  • Ability to program in various languages allowing for different development teams to work with it.
  • The ability to only run web applications. If it could also run self-executing non-web based applications it could be used more heavily.
  • It only allows the use of the Google Cloud store which limits the ability to use other cloud stores already in use in the enterprise.
  • It's a closed API that can lock into being dependent entirely on Google. There are many open-source projects ongoing that can help to alleviate.
If there is a need to deploy a web application on new equipment without purchasing hardware and requiring additional IT support, then App Engine will fit the need. The pricing is low and can be scaled to meet the needs.
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Score 7 out of 10
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We run our entire stack on Google App Engine using a mix of the standard and flex environment to run Golang, Nodejs services, and server-side rendered frontend applications.
Initially, we were using a mix of ec2 instance and AWS EBS stack but the development to deployment process seemed was a bit more complicated than it is on Google App Engine.
  • Automatic scaling of instances based on load.
  • Configurability of the instances, it's easy to get up and running with app engine services. Using the YAML file to configure your environment is simple and straightforward.
  • Google Cloud DNS is easier to configure than it's AWS counterpart.
  • Support for Golang is better.
  • Logging on the cloud console and the debugging feature are amazing.
  • Better documentation and more examples. (Things are already good).
  • Customer support is terrible at times and you have to pay extra to talk to a real person.
  • Cheaper instances.
For someone new diving into cloud services,Google App Engine is a better option than AWS and Microsoft simply because it's easier to navigate and there isn't any code modification needed to get your code up on the cloud. The documents are fairly easy to follow and the code samples are very useful.
Google App Engine feels like its a bit pricier than it's AWS counterpart though and the whole idea of a free tier isn't that clear like AWS.
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August 19, 2019

App Engine!

Score 10 out of 10
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I use Google App Engine to program in Python for data collection and data mining. This is solely being used for engineering and development. It solves the issue of having to manage your own server and allows your apps to be accessed from anywhere there is a computer and internet access. This makes it convenient for sharing between coworkers.
  • Coding environment
  • Create test environments
  • Have a history of all builds
  • Not free
This PaaS is great because you can access your programs and builds anywhere with a computer and internet connection. It's relatively cheap and easy to use. It supports everything I needed so far.
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Score 4 out of 10
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I have been using the Google App Engine within the operations department to streamline integration of all of our data streams. I am attempting to create a more robust analysis of this data and allow for other departments to access it eventually. The problem it is addressing is an easier way of accessing and manipulating data that we create.
  • Cross platform access
  • Data visualizations
  • Operational efficiency
  • Complicated to start using
  • Training required
  • Not everyone is using it
The best scenario for using Google App Engine within a business department or business unit is when the entire unit is aware of its existence and is actively trying to include their work stream through the Google App Engine. If people are working independently then the Google App Engine is not a efficient.
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Score 9 out of 10
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Google App Engine is used by my organization's web development department. We use Google App Engine to build and quality assess new web apps that the department is working on because it requires no new infrastructure or servers. We are able to effectively test the app's scalability without having to pay large fees to do so.
  • The scalability testing of Google App Engine is top notch. You can quickly and efficiently test if your new app will support millions of users.
  • Google App Engine is an out-of-box platform, in that it allows the user to begin development and testing immediately, with no further services needed.
  • Google App Engine's version controlling allows for effective quality assurance. If you make a mistake and the app breaks, you can rollback the update and debug.
  • With a 99.9+% uptime, Google App Engine is very reliable (as are all Google products).
  • Google App Engine has its own version of SQL called GQL which is inferior to straight SQL. This means a steeper learning curve.
  • The documentation on best practices for the platform is lacking.
  • No support for C# is a frustrating limitation.
Google App Engine is well suited for building and quality assuring an app that you expect will receive heavy traffic. With the click of a button, the engine can simulate 10 million users being active on the app. This can serve as great feedback as you work to scale your product.
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Score 7 out of 10
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We developed and deployed a basic app via Google App Engine in order to evaluate their serverless architecture. Development and deployment were mostly pain free, and we were able to quickly go live with a scalable solution where we didn't have to worry about infrastructure, using the language of our choice (many are supported).
  • Supports all popular languages (and you can even bring your own language runtime)
  • Built-in automatic scaling is great
  • Lags behind competing platforms (Azure, AWS) in terms of features
  • Less documentation, examples, etc. as compared to competitors' platforms
I would say that Google App Engine is worth a look, however it doesn't seem to be as full-featured or popular as competing platforms such as AWS and Azure. It also feels a little dated in general. That said, it's still a solid platform and we were able to get live and running with little trouble.
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Robert Christian profile photo
Score 9 out of 10
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[It's being used for] Testing across various departments (Skunkworks. POCs, including Apigee API Gateway).
  • Client SDK and examples for integrating with services (Datastore/Storage/Pub/Sub).
  • Lightweight deployment code/config (lightweight YAML).
  • Autoscale (configuration and runtime).
  • Flexible runtimes.
  • Missing scheduler as a service. Has static cron, but no fault-tolerant, dynamic scheduling as a service. Azure has this.
  • Documentation. Documentation can be stale, to terse, cumbersome to navigate.
  • Deploy time and CI. Azure has Git hooks and auto update built in. So from commit to live can be under one minute. GCP more manual, and closer to 5+ min for same.
Well suited: Prototype. Test. App scale. Small team.

Less well suited. When higher (more granular) level of control is needed, AWS is still superior.
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Andre Masson profile photo
Score 7 out of 10
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Google App Engine (GAE) is the core engine for a specialized web application in-house product. The web application allows the sales department staff to produce reporting, follow up regarding multiple deposit amounts, do the link between Google Drive (as a hosting cloud) and electronic signatures of clients. The web app is also responsible for the "after sales" process and also allows us to maintain the customers' database.
  • Well suited for doing asynchronous long running process jobs through task queues
  • Supports for huge files upload process (fast and efficient)
  • Integrates pretty well with Java and Spring MVC technologies
  • Although GAE does support relational databases if you pay for it, developers wanting to try GAE for free are forced to use cloud datastore which is a NoSQL database.
  • Logging is recorded and accessible through a web console. However, there is no easy way (I mean through the console) to display a custom log line format like it's possible with slf4j or log4j logging patterns. This makes reading log inefficient.
  • The GAE plugins for Eclipse are buggy and inconsistent. Many times we are forced to reboot the local server after a full webapp recompile, and the command line SDK is not intuitive.
Scenarios where Google App Engine is well suited:
  • Allows endpoints for automatic email retrieval process which acts as long running jobs processes
  • "Cron" like web process launchable through simple endpoint URL
  • Java Spring MVC web application or RESTful web services integrated with single page applications (SPA)
Scenarios where it is less appropriate:
  • If your web application requires a short starting time GAE does not perform fast startups. However once started the web app has constant and stable processing speed
  • If the development team is looking for very well integrated product suite (like IDE well integrated with the backend server) then GAE requires much more improvements
Read Andre Masson's full review
Marco Biagiotti profile photo
February 15, 2017

Be fast. Be scalable.

Score 10 out of 10
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Google App Engine is being used in my organization across the whole team to synchronize different activities and to build plug-ins. Why? Automatization of tasks, synchronization of different software, centralization of useful information and data. The Google Cloud Platform is literally the easiest to learn and use Platform As A Service (or PAAS) I have ever used.
  • Easy
  • Interoperating
  • Powerful
  • Not so cheap
  • Learning curve
  • Frequently changes
Google App Engine completely removes server management from your tasks and it automatically does auto scaling and creates new instances as needed in a high availability context. So if you need to be flexible, not so much concerned by server management and fast in scaling is wonderful. If you want something exclusive and more customized it could be quite difficult to use Google App Engine.
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Tyler Longren profile photo
Score 10 out of 10
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We use it across the organization to host various internal projects and for a variety of support-level tools we use in house. Mostly PHP and NodeJS apps, some are pre-built apps that run great on app engine, others are built in house and are tailored to very specific needs that various groups or clients need.
  • Very flexible, runs PHP, Node, Java, Go, etc.
  • Standard environments with regards to the stack being used.
  • Now part of Google Cloud.
  • Documentation for certain things is lacking.
  • Better tutorials for certain stacks.
Getting certain apps to run on App Engine can be a hassle, but if you start building something on App Engine, it's very robust and easily integrates with other Google Cloud offerings. There are, however, tutorials for getting WordPress up and running on AppEngine. Also Laravel is pretty slick with App Engine.
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Jennie Masterson profile photo
Score 10 out of 10
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I used Google App Engine in my final year project to store news stories relating to crime in a database and then plot them on a Google Map depending on whether they were "crime" stories or not.
  • Database management
  • User Friendly
  • Excellent GUI
  • Provide webinars
  • Implement modules in college and Universities to use the product
  • Give regular seminars to students and businesses
Will the person be able to use it to it's full potential?
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Paul Ford profile photo
Score 9 out of 10
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Use is based on client or project needs. It is used mainly as a cloud based API service so that corporate enterprise systems can leverage it internally or with other service dependent applications.
  • Cloud based RESTful APIs
  • Access to big data resources for reporting and analytics
  • Custom Cloud web hosted applications
  • Cost, speed, ease of adoption
  • Implemented a custom company based web site using Vosao on GAE CMS
  • Administration and management - more Azure like portal
  • Better reporting on forecasted and actual usage via notifications.
  • Better documentation, examples. More use case centric documentation.
  • Learning curve is relatively short.
  • Integration to Eclipse is awesome.
  • Integration with standard frameworks is getting better - I would not recommend loading entire spring framework on it, but aspects of it are more useful.
Read Paul Ford's full review
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Score 8 out of 10
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Google Apps seems to be the choice for our designers over Office 365, we have had to implement it as a solution in order to please them. It is mostly being used for email because of the ability to tie in with MAC OS and bind to their workflow bouncing between Adobe CC and OSx.
  • Works with OSx
  • Creates cohesive workflow
  • Allows for easy collaboration
  • Sheets is not as robust as Excel.
  • Hangouts seems to lack some of the resolution you get with Skype.
  • It does not tie well with AD when using another solution like Office 365.
Google Apps would work really well in the SMB environments, in a business looking to switch fully to Google only as the solution it could work really well. Cost wise it is cheaper than Office 365 and adds value when it comes to the licensing cost of Microsoft office and Exchange.
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Christopher McLain profile photo
Score 9 out of 10
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We use Google App Engine for multiple databases.
  • There's a fairly high free quota which makes it easy for startup to use a cloud database.
  • It's extremely scalable if you need it to be.
  • If you know Python, it's fairly easy setup
  • Google App Engine has it's own SQL (called GQL) that takes some getting used to.
  • It's based on Python 2.7, which is an old version and it doesn't have support for every module.
It's perfect for a dynamic database for a startup website since you can coast for a while under the free quota.
Read Christopher McLain's full review
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Score 7 out of 10
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We use Google Apps across our entire organization for email, calendaring, collaboration ( via Google Docs, Sheets, Sites, Hangouts, etc…) directory, archiving and retention, as well as social and video delivery (YouTube). The primary use of Google Apps in our organization is for corporate email. The platform is stable and reliable. Our users are familiar with the interface, keeping training requirements low.
  • Robust email system.
  • Easy to understand document sharing.
  • The calendar integrates well with email.
  • The Apps have limitations. Be sure you are OK with those limitations before you install. Google has not been responsive to feature requests.
  • Managing Calendar without a third-party tool is nearly impossible.
  • Integration with Active Directory is kludgy at best. Do NOT expect the integration to be smooth or the functionality robust.
If your installation relies on Active Directory integration, you may want to consider the product from the company in Redmond, WA instead. In my opinion, this is Google Apps weakness.
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Feature Scorecard Summary

Ease of building user interfaces (13)
8.5
Scalability (26)
9.0
Platform management overhead (26)
8.4
Workflow engine capability (19)
7.9
Platform access control (25)
8.3
Services-enabled integration (23)
8.0
Development environment creation (23)
8.6
Development environment replication (22)
8.5
Issue monitoring and notification (23)
8.5
Issue recovery (22)
8.5
Upgrades and platform fixes (23)
8.5

About Google App Engine

Google App Engine is Google Cloud's platform-as-a-service offering. It features pay-per-use pricing and support for a broad array of programming languages.

Key Features

Popular Languages
Build applications in Node.js, Java, Ruby, C#, Go, Python, or PHP—or bring a custom language runtime

Open & Flexible
Custom runtimes allows developers to bring any library and framework to App Engine by supplying a Docker container

Fully Managed
A fully managed environment lets developers focus on code while App Engine manages infrastructure concerns

Monitoring, Logging & Diagnostics
Google Stackdriver provides application diagnostics to debug and monitor the health and performance of apps

Application Versioning
Host different versions of applications, create development, test, staging, and production environments

Traffic Splitting
Route incoming requests to different app versions, A/B test, and do incremental feature rollouts

Application Security
Help safeguard applications by defining access rules with App Engine firewall and leverage managed SSL/TLS certificates* by default on a custom domain at no additional cost

Services Ecosystem
Tap a growing ecosystem of GCP services from applications including a suite of cloud developer tools

Google App Engine Integrations

Google App Engine Competitors

Pricing

Does not have featureFree Trial Available?No
Has featureFree or Freemium Version Available?Yes
Does not have featurePremium Consulting/Integration Services Available?No
Entry-level set up fee?No

Google App Engine Technical Details

Operating Systems: Unspecified
Mobile Application:No