CircleCI vs. Travis CI

Overview
ProductRatingMost Used ByProduct SummaryStarting Price
CircleCI
Score 8.3 out of 10
N/A
CircleCI is a software delivery engine from the company of the same name in San Francisco, that helps teams ship software faster, offering their platform for Continuous Integration and Continuous Delivery (CI/CD). Ultimately, the solution helps to map every source of change for software teams, so they can accelerate innovation and growth.
$0
per month
Travis CI
Score 7.4 out of 10
N/A
Travis CI is an open source continuous integration platform.
$69
per month
Pricing
CircleCITravis CI
Editions & Modules
Free
$0
per month
Performance
$30
per month
Server
$35
per month
Scale
Custom Pricing
1 Concurrent Job Plan
$69
per month
2 Concurrent Jobs Plan
$129
per month
5 Concurrent Jobs Plan
$249
per month
Free Plan
Free
Offerings
Pricing Offerings
CircleCITravis CI
Free Trial
NoNo
Free/Freemium Version
NoYes
Premium Consulting/Integration Services
NoNo
Entry-level Setup FeeNo setup feeNo setup fee
Additional Details
More Pricing Information
Community Pulse
CircleCITravis CI
Considered Both Products
CircleCI
Chose CircleCI
I think these three tools are just as good as the other except that Travis CI supports mobile a lot better but price wise, CircleCI is the best that I have found and is supports the need for a startup. For a long while, CircleCI had Docker support before Codeship but now, Codesh…
Chose CircleCI
I had used Travis CI in some of my open source projects. However, it was too expensive for us so I looked for an alternative that was in our budget. Scrutinizer is also very useful, but also out of our budget. When we get larger I could see myself using Scrutinizer for quality …
Chose CircleCI
Travis CI is great for open source projects – it's completely free, but CircleCI offers some support for closed projects as well. CircleCI has cheaper pricing plans, and you are able to customize them as much as you want. At Travis CI you can select only a predefined amount of …
Chose CircleCI
Jenkins is usually self-hosted, Travis CI's infrastructure is largely unreliable (lots of tests time out for no discernable reason), and Semaphore encourages you to configure your CI/CD from a web UI. We like CircleCI because its hosted, our tests run largely as expected on …
Chose CircleCI
While the UI on CircleCI is not my favorite, it's leagues better than Travis CI. I really like Heroku CI much better, but the functionality is much more limited there. If Heroku CI had the same functionality as CircleCI, I probably wouldn't use CircleCI.
Chose CircleCI
Because the Travis CI features are not very good, it has a lot of problems with concurrency and the uptime of the on-cloud solution was the worst we have ever tried.
Chose CircleCI
CircleCI is a sass product which means you don't need to maintain your own servers. This can also be a negative as you are dependent on their service. This also means you can't ssh into a machine to see what went wrong like you can with Jenkins. However for most users this …
Chose CircleCI
CircleCI is still being developed and worked on continually while TravisCI is not.
Chose CircleCI
CircleCI seemed to have a quicker setup than other similar products, with a good integration with GitHub repos. Projects are quick and easy to set up within the UI, and workflows can then be created off the back of those fairly intuitively. Clever interpretation of commit …
Chose CircleCI
CircleCI is the company that is innovating compared to the other ones. I think it's a great piece of software compared to other open source options that don't have as much functionality and improved capability over time.
Chose CircleCI
Travis has full YML configuration in areas where CircleCI is slightly lacking still, which is great, but CircleCI offers more features, settings, and potential performance.

Codeship is simpler to use, you can use it entirely from their UI without modifying your Git repository at …
Chose CircleCI
The biggest downside to CircleCI is that it doesn't support parameterized builds, that is testing your code against language version X and Y, or framework version A and B. Beyond that, it is really a great product.
Travis CI
Chose Travis CI
Jenkins is probably the leading choice for automation and has loads of features and a large community behind it, but it can be overkill for many projects. It also has more of a web 1.0 look and interface.
CircleCI is another similar big competitor, but cannot compete with Travis …
Chose Travis CI
There are a few other options out there, CircleCI, Codeship and Wrecker would be a few good ones I can also recommend, each one has its particularity but I believe Travis has the best interface and flexibility of all of them.
I'd recommend trying them all and seeing which one …
Chose Travis CI
There are a number of alternatives to Travis CI, but Travis remains the most popular, since it was one of the first to show up. It has a lot of examples, support for building dozens of languages, and good documentation. Significant portions of the system are open source, so you …
Top Pros
Top Cons
Best Alternatives
CircleCITravis CI
Small Businesses
GitLab
GitLab
Score 8.9 out of 10
GitLab
GitLab
Score 8.9 out of 10
Medium-sized Companies
GitLab
GitLab
Score 8.9 out of 10
GitLab
GitLab
Score 8.9 out of 10
Enterprises
GitLab
GitLab
Score 8.9 out of 10
GitLab
GitLab
Score 8.9 out of 10
All AlternativesView all alternativesView all alternatives
User Ratings
CircleCITravis CI
Likelihood to Recommend
8.0
(26 ratings)
6.0
(8 ratings)
Usability
10.0
(1 ratings)
5.0
(1 ratings)
Performance
7.8
(3 ratings)
-
(0 ratings)
Support Rating
6.9
(6 ratings)
4.0
(1 ratings)
User Testimonials
CircleCITravis CI
Likelihood to Recommend
CircleCI
CircleCI is perfect for a CI/CD pipeline for an app using a standard build process. It'll take more work for a complex build process, but should still be up to the task unless you need a lot of integrations with other tools. If you have a big team and can spare someone to focus full time on just the CI/CD tools, maybe something like Jenkins is better, but if you're just looking to get your app built, tested, and delivered without a huge amount of effort, CircleCI is probably your preferred tool.
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Open Source
TravisCI is suited for workflows involving typical software development but unfortunately I think the software needs more improvement to be up to date with current development systems and TravisCI hasn't been improving much in that space in terms of integrations.
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Pros
CircleCI
  • Multiple builds can be run at the same time in parallel.
  • The CircleCI web interface (UI/UX) is very easy to understand and use.
  • Easy Configuration to learn and use. Just a single configuration YAML file.
  • Many integrations. We use the GItHub, Slack, and DataDog integrations.
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Open Source
  • It is very simple to configure a range of environment versions and settings in a simple YAML file.
  • It integrates very well with Github, Bitbucket, or a private Git repo.
  • The Travis CI portal beautifully shows you your history and console logs. Everything is presented in a very clear and intuitive interface.
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Cons
CircleCI
  • The "phases" their config file uses to separate out options seem very arbitrary and are not very helpful for organizing your config file
  • No way that I know of to configure which version of MongoDB you use. You have to write your own shell script to download and start MongoDB if you want a specific version.
  • Hard to access build artifacts in the UI
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Open Source
  • I think they could have a cheaper personal plan. I'd love to use Travis on personal projects, but I don't want to publish them nor I can pay $69 a month for personal projects that I don't want to be open source.
  • There is no interface for configuring repos on Travis CI, you have to do it via a file in the repo. This make configuration very flexible, but also makes it harder for simpler projects and for small tweaks in the configuration.
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Usability
CircleCI
CircleCI interface is awesome in that it is relatively modern and makes it clear exactly which parts of the engineering lifecycle you are in
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Open Source
TravisCI hasn't had much changes made to its software and has thus fallen behind compared to many other CI/CD applications out there. I can only give it a 5 because it does what it is supposed to do but lacks product innovation.
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Performance
CircleCI
It's pretty snappy, even with using workflows with multiple steps and different docker images. I've seen builds take a long time if it's really involved, but from what I can tell, it's still at least on par if not faster than other build tools.
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Open Source
No answers on this topic
Support Rating
CircleCI
Unless you have a reasonably large account, you're going to be mainly stuck reading their documentation. Which has improved somewhat over the years but is still extremely limited compared to a platform like Digital Ocean who invested in the documentation and a community to ensure it's kept up to date. If you can't find your answer there, you can be stuck.
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Open Source
After the private equity firm had bought this company the innovation and support has really gone downhill a lot. I am not a fan that they have gutted the software trying to make money from it and put innovation and product development second.
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Alternatives Considered
CircleCI
Circle was the first CI with simple setup, great documentation, and tight integration with GitHub. Using Jenkins was too much maintenance and overhead, TeamCity was limited in how we could customize it and run concurrent builds, TravisCI was not available for private repos when we switched.
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Open Source
Jenkins is much more complicated to configure and start using. Although, one you have done that, it's extremely powerful and full of features. Maybe many more than Travis CI. As per TeamCity, I would never go back to using it. It's also complicated to configure but it is not worth the trouble. Codeship supports integration with GitHub, GitLab and BitBucket. I've only used it briefly, but it seems to be a nice tool.
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Return on Investment
CircleCI
  • It has eased the burden of standardizing our testing and deployment, making onboarding new developers much faster, and having to fix deployment mistakes much less often.
  • It allows us to focus our process around the GitHub workflow, ignoring the details of whatever environment the thing we're working on is actually hosted in. This saves us time.
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Open Source
  • It's improved my ability to deliver working code, increasing my development velocity.
  • It increases confidence that your own work (and those of external contributors) does not have any obvious bugs, provided you have sufficient test coverage.
  • It helps to ensure consistent standards across a team (you can integrate process elements like "go lint" and other style checks as part of your build).
  • It's zero-cost for public/open source projects, so the only investment is a few minutes setting up a build configuration file (hence the return is very high).
  • The .travis.yml file is a great way for onboarding new developers, since it shows how to bootstrap a build environment and run a build "from scratch".
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ScreenShots