Rider Reviews

7 Ratings
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Score 8.6 out of 101

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Reviews (1-3 of 3)

Anthony Aziz profile photo
Score 10 out of 10
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All five of our engineers have adopted Rider as our primary IDE for .NET development, which is our main project. We develop an online, web-based service with components in .NET Framework, .NET Core, and Xamarin. Rider has been a successful alternative to Visual Studio to improve developer experience and productivity.
  • Provides a smooth, efficient IDE for developing .NET applications. Performance has been much better than Visual Studio in my experience.
  • Integrated refactoring tools are really comprehensive and useful.
  • Integrates with other JetBrains products such as TeamCity, Upsource, dotTrace, etc.
  • The debugger tools are still lacking compared to Visual Studio, especially when you consider plugins such as OzCode.
  • I still keep Visual Studio installed. Sometimes the project won't build correctly, or exhibit strange behaviour. Usually clean, restart, and rebuild addresses actual issues, but I always double check with Visual Studio in such cases.
  • Versioning can be a bit of a nightmare. There is an official updater, but they tend to leave old versions hanging around and I have found myself accidentally using a previously installed version without intending to.
Rider can pretty much be a drop-in replacement for Visual Studio in most scenarios. The development experience is wonderful, and I have rarely had problems with building, running tests, and debugging applications. You might need to keep around Visual Studio to publish or build installers, but the Rider team is constantly adding feature parity and new features, so the future looks even stronger.
Read Anthony Aziz's full review
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Score 8 out of 10
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All .NET developers in our company have freedom of choice regarding the IDE they want to use, however, we are only using 2 products: JetBrains Rider and Visual Studio. JetBrains Rider is mainly used for rapid application development and for building prototypes. It is used both by developers, but also by QA testers in their daily work.
  • Runs on multiple platforms including Windows 10, Linux distros and macOS.
  • Very intuitive UI especially for developers with Java background.
  • It includes all the coolest ReSharper features.
  • We feel that C# support could be a bit better.
  • Performance on low-end machines is not the best.
If working with legacy code, then Rider includes a really good debugger that works with .NET Framework and Mono. It also has built-in support for JavaScript, TypeScript, HTML, and CSS, which is very useful if your project is front-end technologies related. In case of a project that is very heavy on SQL and databases, then better tools exist on the market.
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Aaron Smith profile photo
Score 9 out of 10
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I personally use Rider daily instead of Visual Studio Enterprise when I am working on our back end web API that is written in ASP.Net Core. I've also started using Rider instead of Visual Studio for our deployment and upgrade applications, and all the utilities that we write to deploy our applications into Azure and AWS. Since I prefer to use Linux as my desktop, instead of Windows, it was an easy choice to start using Rider. However, after using it, I am now hooked on it and also use it on my Windows desktop when I need to work with Windows applications.

If you've ever used Resharper in Visual Studio, you will find that the refactorings and code suggestions that it gives you are very well thought out, make your code cleaner and easier to read, and help you write better code. The only problem with this is that it can sometimes negatively affect the performance of Visual Studio, sometimes so much that you have to turn it off if it's a very large project. Rider gives you back those nice refactorings without the performance hit.

It's smooth, works well, is highly stable, and gets out of my way.
  • Helps you refactor your code into more readable and more efficient code.
  • Highly customizable UI, including color themes, shortcut key remappings, and the ability to put any Window, Toolbar, or Docked tab anywhere you want, even on second screens. Additionally, this functionality can be customized per project, not just globally for the whole machine.
  • More control over Git. Visual Studio just has the basics, but mostly all that is needed is for git repositories. It gets the job done., but Rider takes it one step further and gives you most of what you can do on the command line's simple, easy to access menu options.
  • If you use TeamCity, then you have complete and full integration into your TeamCity build server!
  • You can double tap your control key and get a quick pop up to instantly run any command. Double tap shift and you can search your entire project, filenames, AND text and filter that search!
  • If you are on Linux, it still uses Mono for a few things, such as the interactive C# window. This can be a slight issue if you are in Dotnet Core. While you can get the Dotnet script to work, there is a bug currently in the Dotnet script that doesn't allow the interactive window to work. However, you can run the Dotnet script in a terminal and get the same functionality, just not as easily.
  • Their built-in performance tools do not work on Linux.
Rider works great for all .Net development. For what I am using it for, it's way more performant and stable than full visual studio. It has support for Xamarin (Android and iOS) as well as VB.Net and F#. While I have not done any desktop development, it does support it. However, if you are using some 3rd party UI controls, you may run into some issues getting those control references into the project, and you may still have to use Visual Studio to add them.
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About Rider

JetBrains supports .NET development with Rider, a .NET IDE based on the IntelliJ platform and ReSharper.

Rider Technical Details

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