Every developer should be using Git
Nate Dillon | TrustRadius Reviewer
January 18, 2020

Every developer should be using Git

Score 10 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source

Overall Satisfaction with Git

We use Git as source control for all our projects across our entire department. I know there are other departments in our organization that use it as well. I also use Git for all my personal projects and side projects. Git enables all of our developers to collaborate and contribute code to our projects simultaneously, preventing conflicts.
  • Source control
  • Collaboration
  • Difficult for people who aren't used to the command line (but there are apps for that).
  • Some specific situations where it's difficult to figure out the right way to do things.
  • It's free, so really nothing to lose there.
  • Code is distributed, so we are able to work offline.
The two main alternatives to Git that I know about are Mercurial and Subversion. I've never used either one, but I know a bit about Subversion. From what I remember, Subversion requires a server. I don't anyone using any other source control other than Git, it seems to have pretty much taken over as the primary source control software.
I am not sure what the official Git support channels are like as I have never needed to use any official support. Because Git is so popular among all developers now, it is pretty easy to find the answer to almost any Git question with a quick Google search. I've never had trouble finding what I'm looking for.

Do you think Git delivers good value for the price?

Yes

Are you happy with Git's feature set?

Yes

Did Git live up to sales and marketing promises?

Yes

Did implementation of Git go as expected?

Yes

Would you buy Git again?

Yes

Git is great for pretty much any coding project, whether working on a team or with a single developer. For teams, it enables multiple developers to contribute without getting in each other's way. Git also keeps a history of all code changes, which is why I would also recommend using it on projects with a single developer. The only real scenario where I would maybe not use it is when working with non-tech people. But even then, I might recommend getting them set up with a Git client app and teaching them how to use it.