What users are saying about
23 Ratings

WordPress

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Top Rated
1957 Ratings
23 Ratings
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Score 6 out of 101

WordPress

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Top Rated
1957 Ratings
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Score 8.3 out of 101

Add comparison

Likelihood to Recommend

1ShoppingCart

It's really user preference. Some people have been told by other colleagues that it's a great system to use so they want to go with that. There are other systems that do exactly the same thing. I have not found that 1ShoppingCart has any unique features that would lead me to persuade a client to use it over another one. I usually have clients look at two or three options and give feedback. Sometimes it comes down to monthly prices.
No photo available

WordPress

If you need a website, WordPress should be on your list. The only exception to that would be a large ecommerce site. I wouldn't recommend WordPress to someone who does hundreds of sales per day via their ecommerce platform. Yes, there are add-ons and plugins that can do it, but you can also mop your floor with your cat. Why do that? There are other platforms that specialize in ecommerce and do it so much better.But if you need a social blog, B2B or B2C lead gen, a non-profit, a membership site, a community bulletin board, news site, arts and music or just a simple about me type of website, WordPress is the perfect platform for you. It's so very popular, that it's not going anywhere. It is a platform that will be supported as long there are websites on the internet! You really can't go wrong. Even if you wanted to do an ecommerce site on WordPress, you can. I just would urge you to look at another solution.
Dave Moll profile photo

Feature Rating Comparison

Online Storefront

1ShoppingCart
7.9
WordPress
Product catalog & listings
1ShoppingCart
7.5
WordPress
Product management
1ShoppingCart
8.0
WordPress
Bulk product upload
1ShoppingCart
9.0
WordPress
Branding
1ShoppingCart
7.5
WordPress
Mobile storefront
1ShoppingCart
9.0
WordPress
Product variations
1ShoppingCart
9.0
WordPress
Website integration
1ShoppingCart
7.0
WordPress
Visual customization
1ShoppingCart
7.0
WordPress
CMS
1ShoppingCart
7.0
WordPress

Online Shopping Cart

1ShoppingCart
8.0
WordPress
Abandoned cart recovery
1ShoppingCart
9.0
WordPress
Checkout user experience
1ShoppingCart
7.0
WordPress

Online Payment System

1ShoppingCart
7.5
WordPress
eCommerce security
1ShoppingCart
7.5
WordPress

eCommerce Marketing

1ShoppingCart
7.5
WordPress
Promotions & discounts
1ShoppingCart
8.0
WordPress
Personalized recommendations
1ShoppingCart
7.5
WordPress
SEO
1ShoppingCart
7.0
WordPress

eCommerce Business Management

1ShoppingCart
9.0
WordPress
Multi-site management
1ShoppingCart
9.0
WordPress
Order processing
1ShoppingCart
9.0
WordPress
Inventory management
1ShoppingCart
9.0
WordPress
Shipping
1ShoppingCart
9.0
WordPress
Custom functionality
1ShoppingCart
9.0
WordPress

Security

1ShoppingCart
WordPress
8.5
Role-based user permissions
1ShoppingCart
WordPress
8.5

Platform & Infrastructure

1ShoppingCart
WordPress
8.5
API
1ShoppingCart
WordPress
8.5
Internationalization / multi-language
1ShoppingCart
WordPress
8.4

Web Content Creation

1ShoppingCart
WordPress
8.2
WYSIWYG editor
1ShoppingCart
WordPress
7.8
Code quality / cleanliness
1ShoppingCart
WordPress
8.1
Admin section
1ShoppingCart
WordPress
8.3
Page templates
1ShoppingCart
WordPress
7.8
Library of website themes
1ShoppingCart
WordPress
8.6
Mobile optimization / responsive design
1ShoppingCart
WordPress
8.6
Publishing workflow
1ShoppingCart
WordPress
8.4
Form generator
1ShoppingCart
WordPress
8.0

Web Content Management

1ShoppingCart
WordPress
8.7
Content taxonomy
1ShoppingCart
WordPress
8.4
SEO support
1ShoppingCart
WordPress
8.5
Bulk management
1ShoppingCart
WordPress
8.3
Availability / breadth of extensions
1ShoppingCart
WordPress
9.2
Community / comment management
1ShoppingCart
WordPress
9.0

Pros

  • Email Marketing - Easy to use templates but you can also use your custom html template.
  • Managing your list - It is easy to set up separate lists and create opt in forms for each one. It allows multiple opt in forms with customized messages for all steps of the opt in process.
  • Ecommerce - Setup of your product or service is easy. You can use buy now type buttons on the 1ShoppingCart store. Integration with your merchant account or Paypal is offered.
  • Includes an affiliate management option. This module allows you to manage an affiliate with custom links and an area to post materials for affiliates to use - such as banners.
Karen Repoli profile photo
  • It is constantly being improved, with new features added, because of the community code-sourcing aspect.
  • Security vulnerabilities are continually being patched to keep it secure.
  • It has the best plugin repository, by far. So, anytime you have a needed new feature for your website, there is usually a plugin that already exists to allow you to do what you're wanting.
Ben Beck profile photo

Cons

  • Customer Service - You have to pay in order to speak to a live customer service rep.
Karen Repoli profile photo
  • Because it is the most-used CMS, there are a lot of hackers targeting it. As such, you need to make sure you're always updating the software and patching plugins to the latest version. Not hard to do, but something you need to be vigilant about.
  • Plugins are hit and miss. If it is a new plugin without many existing users and reviews, it is truly hard to know if the software package is any good.
  • Sometimes there are too many options. For example, there are a dozen or so plugins for any given functionality and so you have to sift through to find the right thing.
Ben Beck profile photo

Likelihood to Renew

1ShoppingCart5.5
Based on 2 answers
If I were in charge of the renewal decision I would really take a look at 1SC vs. Infusionsoft. There are many ways each are great and many ways they are different. I would look at what was best for my company and make the choice accordingly. I find that Infusionsoft has many more ways to intuitively market, segment and cultivate new leads and grow the business as a whole than 1SC currently has.
Eliza Hammesfahr Ceci profile photo
WordPress9.3
Based on 35 answers
As we become ever more proficient and thorough with our primary CMS — Hannon Hill's Cascade Server — we may begin to consider bringing these satellite blogs into the single product fold. Should that day come, we would no longer need WordPress. Of course, the switch would mean massive SEO problems and a steep learning curve for many users. A staff our size — one designer / developer, one administrative content manager, one content writer, and a former jack-of-all trades oldhead web guy who now fancies himself an expert at digital marketing — might not be able to handle that migration.Having our blogs separate and distinct from our primary web server has proved successful to date. Their separation makes good sense for the niche audiences each academic program requires. And their shared relationships (via links, social media crossovers and XML feeds) only strengthens our brand by showing just how diverse our offerings are.
Christopher Davis profile photo

Usability

No score
No answers yet
No answers on this topic
WordPress9.0
Based on 13 answers
It's a sophisticated but easy to use piece of software. Many of the content addition pieces are familiar from other pieces of software so there isn't a huge learning curve. And for new areas, there is a lot of info on WordPress.org as well as other WordPress help sites.
Sharon Hurley Hall profile photo

Reliability and Availability

No score
No answers yet
No answers on this topic
WordPress9.5
Based on 3 answers
Anyone can visit WordPress.org and download a fully functional copy of WordPress free of charge. Additionally, WordPress is offered to users as open-source software, which means that anyone can customize the code to create new applications and make these available to other WordPress users.
Martin Aranovitch profile photo

Performance

No score
No answers yet
No answers on this topic
WordPress8.6
Based on 2 answers
Mostly, any performance issues have to do with using too many plugins and these can sometimes slow down the overall performance of your site. It is very tempting to start adding lots of plugins to your WordPress site, however, as there are thousands of great plugins to choose from and so many of them help you do amazing things on your site.If you begin to notice performance issues with your WordPress site (e.g. pages being slow to load), there are ways to optimize the performance of your site, but this requires learning the process. WordPress users can learn how to optimize their WordPress sites by downloading the WPTrainMe WordPress training plugin (WPTrainMe.com) and going through the detailed step-by-step WordPress optimization tutorials.
Martin Aranovitch profile photo

Support

No score
No answers yet
No answers on this topic
WordPress8.0
Based on 10 answers
With WordPress, it's important to differentiate between support for the application itself, and support for third-party components that integrate with WordPress like "plugins" (functionality) and "themes" (web design templates).The WordPress application provides free support via an online community of general users and technical experts (e.g. developers). This support is mostly related to reporting bug fixes, security vulnerabilities, etc., which then get reviewed by the core development team for possible implementation and resolution in the next or a future version upgrade.Most of the problems users experience with WordPress, however, tend to come from third-party plugins and themes causing conflicts or errors. These are developed by a range of different providers, developers, designers, amateur coders, etc. and so the level of support varies. Just like "apps" for mobile devices, there are developers who create robust solutions that play well with everything else on your device and they provide excellent support to users, and there are "fly by the seat of their pants" developers and/or marketers who rush out software that is really "buggy", or they don't have a great customer support structure in place to handle issues and provide solutions quickly (or at all).I gave the rating of 8/10 in this case, because if you focus on the support you can expect to receive for "core" WordPress-related issues only (e.g. bugs or vulnerabilities in the software), there is no dedicated WordPress support "representative" that will directly assist you or manage your case - it's an open source community. And if you focus on the support you can expect to receive for third-party plugins and themes, then that varies greatly depending on who the plugin or theme developer is, and whether you are using a free or premium plugin or theme
Martin Aranovitch profile photo

Online Training

No score
No answers yet
No answers on this topic
WordPress10.0
Based on 1 answer
It is very easy to find online resources to learn how to do just about anything with WordPress.
Lori Berkowitz profile photo

Implementation

No score
No answers yet
No answers on this topic
WordPress6.7
Based on 9 answers
You can create custom RSS and XML to export content from previous CMS' and import this into Wordpress.
Adrian Fraguela profile photo

Alternatives Considered

Again, it's the client that usually selects the system they want to use. I think 1ShoppingCart has lower monthly payment options so that makes it more appealing. Infusionsoft has a $2k payment that must be made in order to use their product
No photo available
The two other open source tools, Joomla! and Drupal, were at one time comparable to WordPress but have since been left behind as WP has more developers working on it. Wix, Weebly, and Squarespace are all great platforms for small companies who don't want to spend any attention on their website... but they are much more limited in extendability than WordPress is.
Ben Beck profile photo

Scalability

No score
No answers yet
No answers on this topic
WordPress10.0
Based on 1 answer
WordPress is completely scalable. You can get started immediately with a very simple "out-of-the box" WordPress installation and then add whatever functionality you need as and when you need it, and continue expanding. Often we will create various WordPress sites on the same domain to handle different aspects of our strategy (e.g. one site for the sales pages, product information and/or a marketing blog, another for delivering products securely through a private membership site, and another for running an affiliate program or other application), and then ties all of these sites together using a common theme and links on each of the site's menus.Additionally, WordPress offers a multisite function that allows organizations and institutions to manage networks of sites managed by separate individual site owners, but centrally administered by the parent organization. You can also expand WordPress into a social networking or community site, forums, etc.The same scalability applies to web design. You can start with a simple design and then scale things up to display sites with amazing visual features, including animations and video effects, sliding images and animated product image galleries, elements that appear and fade from visitor browsers, etc.The scaling possibilities of WordPress are truly endless.
Martin Aranovitch profile photo

Return on Investment

  • Faster lead conversion, definitely
No photo available
  • WordPress has allowed my company to quickly get into content marketing (blog posts, ebooks, case studies, etc.) without any support from the developers, as marketing owns the delivery mechanism (WordPress)!
  • One negative aspect of our WordPress usage is that, because it is so easy-to-use and we've made it apparent we don't need developer help to support it, when we actually do need developers for a non-WordPress related project, we can't get the help!
  • WordPress-hosted forms/landing pages bring in the majority of our leads, which end up in sales demos and eventually new revenue.
Ben Beck profile photo

Pricing Details

1ShoppingCart

General
Free Trial
Yes
Free/Freemium Version
Premium Consulting/Integration Services
Entry-level set up fee?
No
Additional Pricing Details

WordPress

General
Free Trial
Free/Freemium Version
Premium Consulting/Integration Services
Entry-level set up fee?
No
Additional Pricing Details