TrustRadius
Redis is an open source in-memory data structure server and NoSQL database.https://dudodiprj2sv7.cloudfront.net/product-logos/jG/Kt/P5M6TS4T2XVL.pngRedis - memory is the new diskI used Redis in the context of an Airline company middleware implementation. At that time, we were looking for an efficient caching solution with the possibility to distribute data across nodes (i.e. sort of data grid without the complexity of a data grid). Redis allowed us to build very fast a small cluster of nodes (4) serving as a cache for storing web sessions. Because of additional features of Redis (pub/sub, in memory Keystore), Redis was also identified as non-critical storage for some data.,Redis is easy to learn and concepts are very simple. It's an in-memory storage with regular snapshots for data resiliency. Redis offers the possibility to act as a cache with limited but strong eviction set policies. LRU is the most common one. The pub/sub feature of Redis is an interesting alternative for efficient and fast data distribution when we don't need a central broker such as JMS. Obviously, it requires some analysis before choosing between the bunch of providers (JMS, Kafka, MQTT, AMQP, Redis, etc),Redis is sponsored by Redislab which limit its functionalities. This is normal but they should push for a graphical tool for Redis monitoring. This tool is available for the enterprise edition, it would be nice to have a core version for the community I don't know if Redis is available in containers, this might be interesting to have such capability,8,Redis has a fast learning curve for developers and operations teams. Community edition allows touching a small part of Redis capabilities. In case we need support and additional features, we can decide to buy the enterprise edition which offers many additional features.,Hazelcast, memcached and TIBCO ActiveSpaces,Vagrant, Docker, OpenShift,9,15,5,The main use case was for caching data in a distributed context. Redis is really powerful while dealing with data sharding and heavy traffic load Another use case of Redis was the capacity to server faster data compare to physical databases. It was used for non-critical systems. The last use case (minor) was to explore the pub/sub capability of Redis in the context of the multi-tenant application,To be honest, we were not really innovating with Redis, we were using common features.,I'm not anymore working for the company, but I remember that LUA script was explored. They were also trying to build bigger cluster (~100/150 nodes)Redis on high scalability worldWe use redis and recommend for our clients. The key areas Redis outsteps all others are: 1) Scalability 2) Unique and flexible key value db structure 3) They use Ssd Flash for their instances They also provide session management capabilities to be implemented in any huge projects without much headache. Their db instance also provides a high number of read write per second, which makes it a leader.,Session Management Key value pair DB structure High scalability Flash instances,Failover Replicas Data Consistency,I will be delighted to answer this particular question. Redis has a unique geo spatial records handling product that makes me sort millions of records according to user location, that may vary from user to user. This helped me to scale the speed of 3 minutes to just 20 seconds when combined with google cloud capabilities.,10,It increased my speed of meshing. It increased my user experience by stream-less rendering. It created huge impact in my metasearch, my basic income has increased by 120% in last 45 days.,Cassandra, MongoDB and Aerospike Database,Google Cloud SQL,10Trust Redis: A Review on TrustRadiusRedis was used internally by software development teams as part of a web application stack. Each development team was free to use alternate technologies, including none at all, but for teams with performance requirements, Redis was chosen to provide an in memory cache layer buffering web requests from directly hitting the database.,In memory caching Fast read and write access Data structure based API,Clustering and sharding Self managing for high availability Failover,Redis' in memory implementation makes it particularly well suited as an application cache. For Web tier stacks, it can be used for session management. In addition to its in memory implementation, its core API is based around data structures, not just Key-Value Pairs, making it far more versatile for caching database responses.,9,Redis has reduced the hardware requirement cost for our RDMS machines, by offloading work to redis servers There is increased complexity which translates to development time, in order to build an application to leverage Redis The increased complexity in application design has a net benefit of increasing fault tolerance,Memcached and MongoDB,Evernote, G Suite, Stripe,9A good key-value\no SQL productWe have tried using Redis to move from a relational DB to a key-value logic. In view of the use of a DB not SQL, it is certainly performant even if unlike other SQLs, it requires a little more reasoning about the proper analysis of the key value to be used and the way in which they are then interrogated.,key - value logic no SQL structure really speedy queries,need an initial implementation without a correct key - value queries do not perform need a change of the actual application to move from SQL to Redis,Redis is definitely a good solution (in the best case) if you are willing to change your SQL structure to a no-SQL structure, but only if you know what you want to get and what kind of application you want to access the data, otherwise the performance can be very degraded.,8,SQL server freed from workload less effort to clean up unnecessary data,MongoDB,8Redis: Awesome in-memory key-value distributed CAP compliant storeWe use Redis for low latency repetitive point queries. To break it down: Low latency: As it is in memory, saves on I/ORepetitive: As part of ETL we use it to address resolution, .i.e. given an address, find a representative lat long for it. As millions of rows are ETLed every day, there is high chance that they repeat. Having in-memory helps againPoint queries: WHERE age BETWEEN 10 and 30 is a range query and WHERE age = 15 is a point query. We use it only for point queries,When dataset is small enough to fit in-memory and get full benefits of reduced I/O Need of rich data structures for complex querying Speed of in-memory store and durability by disk at the same time,Declarative querying like SQL Tools for monitoring and identifying performance bottlenecks Key schema design can be tricky and heavily impacts the performance (leading to key scans),Redis ModulesAbility to extend Redis is a huge power using its robust backend pipelineRedis Enterprise has smart support for FlashRedis (e) smartly decides, based on usage, which keys to put in RAM and what to put in SSD, opening up whole new possibilities of storing more data and not needing to create subsets for RedisOptimistic concurrency control support An educated developer knows better on what objects to obtain lock and avoid concurrency and dead lock problems which other databases run into. Redis gives the flexibility to either create a critical section or obtain optimistic locks on certain variables,10,We use it all the time for point queries and it worked well Though it is in-memory it is distributed and durable We need high availability for ETL and low read latency accelerates even further,MemSQL,React,10
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Redis
54 Ratings
Score 8.8 out of 101
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Redis Reviews

Redis
54 Ratings
Score 8.8 out of 101
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Hugo Romani Cortes profile photo
March 30, 2018

User Review: "Redis - memory is the new disk"

Score 8 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
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I used Redis in the context of an Airline company middleware implementation. At that time, we were looking for an efficient caching solution with the possibility to distribute data across nodes (i.e. sort of data grid without the complexity of a data grid).
Redis allowed us to build very fast a small cluster of nodes (4) serving as a cache for storing web sessions.
Because of additional features of Redis (pub/sub, in memory Keystore), Redis was also identified as non-critical storage for some data.
  • Redis is easy to learn and concepts are very simple. It's an in-memory storage with regular snapshots for data resiliency.
  • Redis offers the possibility to act as a cache with limited but strong eviction set policies. LRU is the most common one.
  • The pub/sub feature of Redis is an interesting alternative for efficient and fast data distribution when we don't need a central broker such as JMS. Obviously, it requires some analysis before choosing between the bunch of providers (JMS, Kafka, MQTT, AMQP, Redis, etc)
  • Redis is sponsored by Redislab which limit its functionalities. This is normal but they should push for a graphical tool for Redis monitoring. This tool is available for the enterprise edition, it would be nice to have a core version for the community
  • I don't know if Redis is available in containers, this might be interesting to have such capability
Redis fits perfectly when the cache is required or when fast data access is a criterion. With the community edition, we can build very fast and efficient cluster of data nodes with adequate persistent policy.

I don't recommend Redis if you are looking for something else than a key/value store. Even if Redis claims to be a "data structure server", you might face limitations while dealing with other data structures.
Read Hugo Romani Cortes's full review
prakash ps profile photo
January 31, 2018

User Review: "Redis on high scalability world"

Score 10 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
We use redis and recommend for our clients. The key areas Redis outsteps all others are:
1) Scalability
2) Unique and flexible key value db structure
3) They use Ssd Flash for their instances

They also provide session management capabilities to be implemented in any huge projects without much headache. Their db instance also provides a high number of read write per second, which makes it a leader.
  • Session Management
  • Key value pair DB structure
  • High scalability
  • Flash instances
  • Failover Replicas
  • Data Consistency
Redis is particularly suited when you want to mesh millions of data and get a unique statistics or a child dataset out of it. Then Redis is the only viable product with the highest number of read and write per second. It increases my speed drastically so that I am able to put 10k records per second and successfully retrieve at same speed.
Read prakash ps's full review
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March 16, 2018

"Trust Redis: A Review on TrustRadius"

Score 9 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
Redis was used internally by software development teams as part of a web application stack. Each development team was free to use alternate technologies, including none at all, but for teams with performance requirements, Redis was chosen to provide an in memory cache layer buffering web requests from directly hitting the database.
  • In memory caching
  • Fast read and write access
  • Data structure based API
  • Clustering and sharding
  • Self managing for high availability
  • Failover
Redis is great for application cache, internet cache, sharing sessions across stateless web servers. It also works well as a serializing channel for stream data. It has a pub-sub layer as well, which can be used to facilitate peer to peer data sharing. Because it's built as an in-memory store, it is not suitable for data durability.
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February 06, 2018

Redis Review: "A good key-value\no SQL product"

Score 8 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
We have tried using Redis to move from a relational DB to a key-value logic. In view of the use of a DB not SQL, it is certainly performant even if unlike other SQLs, it requires a little more reasoning about the proper analysis of the key value to be used and the way in which they are then interrogated.
  • key - value logic
  • no SQL structure
  • really speedy queries
  • need an initial implementation
  • without a correct key - value queries do not perform
  • need a change of the actual application to move from SQL to Redis
If you want to increase your database queries changing from SQL to Redis probably you can optimize your performance using in-memory cached by Redis, doing this you can have a better workload on SQL servers but you have to configure correctly your complete infrastructure. Furthermore, you need a little bit of time to test your calls with a stress test.
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Nitin Pasumarthy profile photo
October 09, 2017

Review: "Redis: Awesome in-memory key-value distributed CAP compliant store"

Score 10 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
We use Redis for low latency repetitive point queries. To break it down:
  • Low latency: As it is in memory, saves on I/O
  • Repetitive: As part of ETL we use it to address resolution, .i.e. given an address, find a representative lat long for it. As millions of rows are ETLed every day, there is high chance that they repeat. Having in-memory helps again
  • Point queries: WHERE age BETWEEN 10 and 30 is a range query and WHERE age = 15 is a point query. We use it only for point queries
  • When dataset is small enough to fit in-memory and get full benefits of reduced I/O
  • Need of rich data structures for complex querying
  • Speed of in-memory store and durability by disk at the same time
  • Declarative querying like SQL
  • Tools for monitoring and identifying performance bottlenecks
  • Key schema design can be tricky and heavily impacts the performance (leading to key scans)
Good for:
  • Low latency queries are a must
  • Frequent point queries as it is a key-value store
  • Use awesome Redis Modules (Redis Search, Redis Neural Net, Redis ML, Redis-Secondary, Redis Graph)
Not suitable for (as far as I know):
  • When values are complex objects and not simple data structures. Document stores are better for those work loads
  • Huge data and not feasible (due to budget constraints) to scale up RAM
Read Nitin Pasumarthy's full review
Anson Abraham profile photo
October 25, 2017

User Review: "REDIS great as K/V cache"

Score 8 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
[It's being used as a] Caching service for quick key lookups.
  • Quick key lookups.
  • Distribution of data is easy and reliable.
  • Almost HA.
  • HA automatic failover for master and promoting slave on own.
  • Doesn't handle 1M r/s sadly.
  • Cross DC replication not so great.
If you're doing caching, it's perfect. Especially when doing key-value store lookups. However, if you have a hardware load balancer, then setting up multiple slaves would be good. One slave is not so great for 1 million reads per sec. Transactions to the master can be slow at times depending on how much written to it Not as afast as say cassandra for writes.
Read Anson Abraham's full review
No photo available
March 16, 2017

Review: "Redis is great, and your application can be great too!"

Score 10 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
We mostly use Redis as a cache for data flowing through a data processing pipeline. When we have surges of activity, we rely on redis to alleviate the stress on our pipeline and ensure that no messages are lost. We also use some of the features in Redis to synchronize our services across several servers.
  • Caching - that's what it's built to do, and it does it well.
  • Performance - pretty much everything happens in memory, so it's blazing fast.
  • Atomic operations - when you need a distributed counter, Redis is a great option for avoiding race conditions across services/servers.
  • Blocking calls - polling for changes kinda stinks, and Redis gives you the option to perform blocking calls that immediately return when data is ready.
  • Complex querying - Redis is not a relational database, and should not be used as one.
  • Clustering - this is always a complicated topic, but it could be made more simple.
For anything that requires a cache, redis has been a great option for me for several years. It can easily handle a huge volume of requests, making it a fantastic way to speed up a popular web application, for example. Being able to automatically expire entries after a certain amount of time helps reduce load caused by complex calculations or queries that use other data sources. It's simply fantastic.
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March 27, 2017

Redis Review: "gets your job done fast, smooth and fast."

Score 10 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
We have a range of sensors that transmit data to our server and this data is stored in a MongoDB database; while it's stored we needed a way to transmit the data to our web application to generate live charts on the fly; to accomplish this we used redis coupled with socket.io since the application storing the data and the application generating the charts are seperate entities. Though there are other ways to accomplish this, redis has been really useful is helping us accomplish this.

Another place where we are using redis is for our caching, since we deal with high volumes of data, we use redis as a caching mechanism and it has done wonders for us.
  • Speed. The very fact that it is used for caching systems should verify that it must be really fast.
  • Pubsub. Though there might be alternatives that solve this problem as well, in our case redis did it accurately and without any data loss.
  • Redis has a couple of data types that aren't available in other systems. The most useful one according to me is lists; I haven't been able to take full advantage of this feature yet though.
  • Redis may not be for you if you want to deploy a cluster but don't have at least 5 different devices since it requires at least 3 masters and 2 slaves for the configuration to work.
  • The reason redis is really fast is because it resides in your RAM hence it might be a problem when you have an application that needs a lot of RAM and it has to share that with redis. This will depend on the size of your application, users using the applications and obviously the amount of RAM you have.
If you are dealing with an application that needs to serve high volumes of redundant data or feel that memcached isn't doing enough for you, then it's time to consider redis. Also, redis can be a great tool to communicate between different applications without creating interfaces that might take a lot of time build.
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Adam Lauer profile photo
May 24, 2016

User Review: "Redis: A Caching Database on Steroids"

Score 9 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
We use redis as a cheap, available, quick storage option. Think of it as a cache on steroids. It lets us store mass amounts of data and access it quickly. The best part is the access cost is not per demand, you are just paying what is hosting the redis clusters.
  • Quick lookup/interaction with data
  • Excellent key-value storage where everything is treated as a hashtable
  • Cheap alternative to other storage solutions
  • Mass amounts of storage is supported
  • The backup and recovery solutions are not ideal; recommend backing it with a more durable option
  • The spin up to find an optimal setup for performance takes time and testing
  • No super user friendly GUI application to interact with the data
This is best for needing to access data at a high volume quickly at a low cost. This is not the best option if you need high durability of the data and cannot suffer any data loss. Redis is perfect for key-value situations of data including a key being a hash and the value being a huge json object. It is not good when you need a more relational schema.
Read Adam Lauer's full review

Feature Scorecard Summary

Performance (1)
7.3
Availability (1)
7.3
Concurrency (1)
6.4
Security (1)
6.4
Scalability (1)
8.2
Data model flexibility (1)
4.5
Deployment model flexibility (1)
5.5

About Redis

Redis is an open source in-memory data structure server and NoSQL database.

Redis Technical Details

Operating Systems: Unspecified
Mobile Application:No