Do you deploy a lot of content daily? Do you have strong technical resources? Drupal 8 might be a fit!
Kyle Reichelt | TrustRadius Reviewer
December 26, 2018

Do you deploy a lot of content daily? Do you have strong technical resources? Drupal 8 might be a fit!

Score 8 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source

Overall Satisfaction with Drupal

My company was recently hired to build out a fully integrated digital ecosystem for a large endurance brand; inclusive of a CMS, E-commerce Platform, Data warehousing, and a data normalization engine to tie it all together. For this, we selected Drupal 8, Magento, and AWS (Redshift and Lambdas).

Being a global brand, Drupal 8 was the CMS (built by developers for developers) that provided the most extensible launchpad with localization and language support, as well as great workflow and collaboration tools for content creators.

Drupal 8 is utilized by brand ambassadors to submit content for review, internal editors to review content, race directors to manage events and venues, as well as marketers to post landing pages. It ensures consistent branding across the board.
  • Content Types... these are amazing. Whereas a more simplistic CMS like WordPress will basically allow you to make posts and build pages, Drupal 8 gives you the ability to define different types of content that behave differently, and are served up differently in different areas of the website.
  • Extensibility... it scales, ohhhh does it scale. They've really figured out server-side caching, and it makes all the difference. Once a page has been cached, it's available instantly to all users worldwide; and when coupled with AWS, global redundancy and localization mean that no matter where you're accessing the site, it always loads fast and crisp.
  • Workflows... you have the ability to define very specific roles and/or user-based editorial workflows, allowing for as many touchpoints and reviews between content creation and publication as you'll require.
  • This is NOT the most intuitive CMS. You really need to take the time to understand how Drupal 8 works--how content is served up--if you're going to administer a site. Whereas WordPress is very "flat" and simple, Drupal 8 is much more dynamic. You utilize Views to access your content/data and "blocks" to build out beautiful landing pages (similar to widgets in WordPress). I had to prepare a TON of documentation for the client--so many user guides.
  • It is not very friendly to engineers. It probably took 3 to 4 times longer to build out a Drupal 8 site as opposed to had we built it as a static site with perhaps a WordPress back-end (though you would have required multiple WordPress instances to manage localization and other things, which is what we were replacing).
  • It seems that the Drupal 8 consortium (or whatever) is trying to push the ball forward a little too far, rather than consistently maintaining a solid foundation. There were many times when my engineers had to build entirely custom modules to compensate for known bugs in Drupal 8. I have good engineers and we still lost weeks to deploy a workaround. Your organization might not be so lucky as to have an appropriate caliber of engineers, though I hope it is!
  • The client was very happy with the website, and with the work we put into bringing it to life. I hope that it's had a positive impact on their core business, but this isn't something I have visibility into.
Drupal is certainly a more complex animal, comparatively. But its power lies in its flexibility, extensibility, and stability. And the API is fantastic. There's really nothing else like it.
It is great if you're a medium to large-scale operation that is heavily reliant on always having fresh content deployed to your web properties. It is particularly great if you need to localize your website in different countries (landing pages, languages, etc). It can save you a lot of time that would otherwise be spent maintaining separate websites, and deploying often redundant content to the different websites. Every human touchpoint has the potential for error.

It is not great if you just need a static website, and you aren't deploying more than just a simple blog. It's not great if you don't have senior-level developers to maintain the site. If you're the type of company that needs your website to be "done" then you've come to the wrong place. A Drupal 8 website is itself a living organism that requires an ongoing commitment.

Drupal Feature Ratings

WYSIWYG editor
8
Code quality / cleanliness
7
Admin section
8
Page templates
10
Library of website themes
5
Mobile optimization / responsive design
9
Publishing workflow
10
Form generator
9
Content taxonomy
9
SEO support
9
Bulk management
9
Availability / breadth of extensions
9
Community / comment management
7
API
10
Internationalization / multi-language
10
Role-based user permissions
9