Great for Higher Ed
September 08, 2021

Great for Higher Ed

Anonymous | TrustRadius Reviewer
Score 9 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User

Overall Satisfaction with Miro

I am a professor at a large university, teaching design studios (interior architecture), professional practice, and structures. I use Miro as a primary student engagement platform--progress pin-ups, collaborative team spaces, digital presentation boards, etc. Miro helps keep us engaged in a visual platform, allows for collaborative learning and feedback, and helps my students stay accountable (since they can revisit work that would otherwise have been taken down).
  • A digitally accessible graphic platform that can host a variety of content.
  • Manage multiple users (with engagement tracking) and teams.
  • Clean presentation mode when tools are no longer needed--great for virtual engagement.
  • The limits on the educational license are very challenging. Students can create boards and the only workflow for the professor to delete them is to remove the student from the team, reassign the board, re-invite the student, and manually delete the board.
  • Only having one workspace for educators is challenging. Managing multiple "teams" (aka classes) within the workspace is confusing when there are multiple courses, and possibly breakout teams within each course. It would be great to have a workspace per course, or the ability to filter the team's list. Scrolling can be overwhelming, and naming for filtering becomes long and cumbersome.
  • Filtering the boards can be challenging when there are dozens to sort through.
  • Establishing templates could be a more straightforward process. Creating a board > saving as a template > applying a template isn't always intuitive.
  • Exporting a board can be incredibly challenging when the board contains quite a bit of content.
  • In March 2019 our university cancelled in-person learning on the Thursday of spring break. I was able to adapt to online learning in a matter of days (three classes, 125 students) and was up and running by the following Monday.
  • During class presentations, I open up the floor for comments and questions using digital tagging and notifications. Miro has enabled us to create a more collaborative community of learning, which I have learned from and continue to implement today.
  • Improved accountability--when my students can see everyone's work, and I can see whose work is missing--it is easier for me to take a snapshot, track who submitted deliverables on time and follow up with students who may be falling behind.
The management of multiple users and multiple courses in an education application is challenging. It is fairly easy for my students to jump in and work, though.
Team management is a challenge. The more complex functionality is relatively easy to figure out, and the base interface is fairly straightforward for my students. When multiple students are uploading at once, it is difficult because work can upload on top of others' complete work. Sometimes things are inadvertently moved before they can be locked down.

Do you think Miro delivers good value for the price?

Not sure

Are you happy with Miro's feature set?

Yes

Did Miro live up to sales and marketing promises?

I wasn't involved with the selection/purchase process

Did implementation of Miro go as expected?

I wasn't involved with the implementation phase

Would you buy Miro again?

Yes

Google Slides integrates well with our university account system, but it forces linear presentation/content, which is not always appropriate. I had challenges managing Prezi as an individual and never used it to collaborate with multiple people, much less a full team. The zoomy navigation can also be off-putting at times.
This is a phenomenal resource for an educational environment, allowing graphic-based content collaboration. I can see the potential for design teams or client presentations where feedback is necessary. I would probably still create the presentation in another program (INDD) and upload images to Miro. Then use Miro for the presentation and feedback loop.