A great way to bridge the gap in a remote world.
May 26, 2022

A great way to bridge the gap in a remote world.

Anonymous | TrustRadius Reviewer
Score 9 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User

Overall Satisfaction with Miro

With the pandemic making remote work the new norm, Miro has played a critical role in my team's efforts to continue to collaborate and brainstorm together, in order to record new ideas and map out our process. I love the ability to work with my team in real-time, all the features Miro offers make collaborating a very smooth process. For example, during brainstorming sessions, I am able to set a timer for participants to let their imagination run wild and post whatever comes to their minds. When the timer is up, we can switch to presenter mode and go through each of the team's ideas, and set up polls to vote on our favorite ones.
  • Intuitive, I've had numerous people jump on for the first time and have no problem figuring out the basic concept of posting notes on a board.
  • Being able to follow presenters, and collaborate in real-time.
  • Scalability, I've used Miro for multiple exercises, from brainstorming sessions, to presentations, and even for creating site maps
  • I once created a board while logged into the wrong team, so having a way to move that board/project to the correct team would have been nice.
  • When you create a text box, it extends out well beyond the actual text, I would like to be able to resize the text "box", without changing the size of the actual text.
  • More quick selections for colors for sticky notes, without having to create a new color.
  • Bypasses physical restrictions, I work on a global design team, so we have members halfway across the world we need to collaborate with, Miro has been the go-to tool for sharing designs, and running through design exercises because of its ability to work in real-time.
  • Reduced friction, I often have to present designs and ideas to stakeholders who often don't have an account set up, so the ability for them to follow a link and not have to create an account has been a huge selling point for the design team, as it greatly reduced the friction for all team members, regardless of their department, to participate.
  • Savings on resources, because Miro's features are so robust, I am able to compile and share just about everything from one board. E.g. I can display and showcase my results from a workshop, a site map, my timeline, and all of my designs, on a single board, with no need to switch between several different software tools.
I love that you don't need to have an account to join a board, that was a huge selling point to me, as having to log in or create an account is one of the biggest headaches in most workflows.
I haven't heard any complaints from those who I've shared links with, or from those on my team, most of the designers use Miro for at least one part of the design thinking process, typically the brainstorming or research phase.
Miro has played a pivotal role in my team's method of collaborating on projects. I started working for this company during the height of the pandemic as a remote worker, and haven't actually met most of the members of my team, but I have had zero issues using Miro to collaborate with them during brainstorming sessions, working through a workshop or showcasing a design.

Do you think Miro delivers good value for the price?

Yes

Are you happy with Miro's feature set?

Yes

Did Miro live up to sales and marketing promises?

Yes

Did implementation of Miro go as expected?

Yes

Would you buy Miro again?

Yes

I think Miro is the most robust of all these tools, some may be more specialized and be better suited for a specific scenario, but oftentimes you would need to use several different tools to accomplish what you could do with just one board using Miro.
Figma, Lucidchart, Adobe XD, Microsoft 365 (formerly Office 365)
I use Miro almost exclusively when it comes to brainstorming or running workshops, it's extremely intuitive so I feel comfortable inviting anyone, even if they don't consider themselves tech-savvy, and most of the time they are able to figure out the post-it notes idea fairly quickly. I know there are templates for things like site maps or workflows, I've even used a couple, but I haven't seen it being utilized in the industry as often, so I wonder if you couldn't push that idea more.