TrustRadius
https://media.trustradius.com/product-logos/VW/gd/DN0EUOTT0D1R.pngVirtualization is made simple with Hyper-VWe use Hyper-V across our whole organization. We have multiple Windows and Linux servers running as virtual machines on Hyper-V. Almost all servers are run as virtual machines. It allows us to easily spin up new servers as needed, and easily decommission older servers.,Hyper-V is very easy to administer. Day-to-day operations are done through the Hyper-V Manager, which is simple and intuitive to use. It allows complete servers to be easily be backed up to either local storage or cloud storage (or both). You can restore whole virtual machines as well as individual files if needed. It is simple to create a checkpoint of a virtual machine before any changes are made or updates applied and changes can be easily rolled back if needed. Hyper-V does require adequate CPU and memory and should be used with fast storage, so plan ahead.,It would be nice if there was a way to upgrade virtual machines from generation 1 to generation 2. Also, better support for older operating systems.,9,Again, greatly reduced hardware costs. Simplified and unified backup and disaster recovery across both Windows and Linux servers. Much easier scale-ability.,VMware Workstation Player (formerly VMware Player),Windows ServerHyper-VWe chose Hyper-V to create our virtual infrastructure for our on premise servers. Our current hardware was at end of life and had the opportunity to upgrade to newer hardware and have enough space for more servers.,Virtual Environment Scale-ability Ease of use,None that I have noticed.,10,Hardware Costs Support Costs Future needs,VMware ESXi,VMware Fusion, Parallels Desktop,3,2,Scalability Hardware Costs Licensing,We use as designed,We use as designed.,10,No,Price Product Features Product Usability Product Reputation Existing Relationship with the Vendor,None.,Third-party professional services,No,Change management was minimal,None,10,No,We had issues with the initial deployment and Microsoft support had experience with the issue before and was able to resolve quickly.,10,creating a virtual machine adding different OS versions Updating virtual machine hardware requirements,None,10Hyper-V: Free with DatacenterHyper-V was used across the enterprise at my previous job. It consisted of a three-host cluster with over 1TB ram and 200TB of production storage. It also included over 200 VMs running Windows Server 2016 RD Datacenter.,Hyper-V is better than having a lot of physical boxes and hardware. Hyper-V is priced well; meaning if you buy a Datacenter center license its free for unlimited, the standard is up to 3 VMs. You can buy single VM licenses to add to standard in lieu of Datacenter license. I think the cost equals out after 8 single VM purchases, so if you plan on running more than 8-10 VMs you may want to look at Datacenter.,Hyper-V is behind the curve in terms of live migration. I feel that the winner for this is VMWare. This is a Microsoft based program, so getting support on it can prove more difficult than others. More than likely you'll get quicker support from your reseller. Hyper-V was awful in 2008, it started getting better in 2012 and was pretty good in 2016, but still inferior to VMWare.,7,We have had Hyper-V crap out and we could not find out why it happened. There are a lot of unknowns. To a company with a limited budget that is looking to P2V to save on hardware and electrical cost, while lowering their datacenter footprint, this is a good option. Cheaper than VMWare and hyper-converged.,VMware ESXi,VMware ESXi, Todoist, LastPassHyper-V is the happy middle pointWe're a small IT operation in the higher education industry. We use Hyper-V as our primary production-grade virtualization tool. While it may not be as feature-packed as other options, it does what we need. At the end of the day we're just trying to virtualize infrastructure, and do not even need fancy high availability tools or near-real time replication. Just run more servers on less physical hardware.,Windows Server Virtualization Windows Server Configuring Uptime,Microsoft Licensing is Complicated Harder to configure real-time migration Focus on Microsoft products, support is weak for non-Microsoft systems,8,Hyper-V has been cost effective for us. It is wrapped into our existing licenses. We've been allowed to deploy new VM's faster because we already have the core server in place. On the negative side, with all the off the shelf VM's for VMware, we have to deal with imports/conversions.,VMware ESXi and Oracle VM VirtualBox,Oracle VM VirtualBox, SentinelOne, Zoom, Google Data Studio, Google Cloud SQLHyper-V built into Windows for freeWe have configured stand-alone Hyper-V servers and failover Hyper-V clusters. All of our servers are currently running under Hyper-V. From a cost perspective, all servers running windows under the Hyper-V node are free as long as you have a Windows datacenter license. This helps us keep costs down, and allows us to spin up new servers without additional licensing costs for the OS.,Live migration. High availability. Easily create new VMS. Dynamically adjust RAM.,Troubleshooting can be difficult. Occasional live migration failures are causing all other VM's to fail. A fair bit of setup is needed to get a cluster configured and up.,8,No cost for VM OS's when running Windows data center on the Hyper-V Node. Windows standard comes with 2 VM guest OS licenses. Allows you to run an entirely Microsoft environment, no VMware or other training required.,,Windows Server, Microsoft Exchange, Microsoft System Center Configuration ManagerGreat Hypervisor for IT and MoreHyper-V is our bare-metal hypervisors. Anything that we run on-premise resides on a Hyper-V virtual machine. Our Hyper-V implementation is simple, with local storage on the servers and no failover clustering.,Hyper-V is free. Totally free. No feature limits aside from the lack of a GUI on the server itself, but so long as you have a Windows workstation, you can manage it remotely. Remote management is excellent, and the default way to interact with the hypervisor. PowerShell is extensively supported and very powerful. If you have complex needs or like to get your hands dirty, the tools are very powerful. It's a very stable platform. Our hypervisors require so little maintenance it's a dream. And the virtual machines are also stable and fast.,There are some options not present in the GUI tools. It seems features are implemented with PowerShell commands before being brought to the GUI. Hyper-V will sometimes be a bit slower to pick up new virtualization technologies like GPU sharing, as compared with VMware or even Microsoft's own Azure.,9,We haven't spent a penny on Hyper-V, but Microsoft still makes their nut from the other products you inevitably purchase to use with Hyper-V, like the Windows Server. We've been able to very cheaply provide on-premise virtual machines for developers without having to pay a cloud provider.,,Windows Server, Microsoft Azure, Druva inSyncHyperV The Hypervisor SolutionHyperV became the Virtualization choice to replace or migrate as many systems to a Virtual Environment. This decision spanned the entire company. The largest business problem it solved was the physical space and requirements needed to continue to use physical servers. It also addressed the increasing complexity of server management. High Density computing offers many advantage and can deliver a substantial cost savings when compared.,Virtual Machine Management and Resource Management is very good. You can adjust many resources while the VM is running and take Advantage of reducing impact to production. For example you can grow a virtual hard drive "hot", even when its larger than 2TB. Cluster Management is very easy to set up and allows you to "live migrate resources" while in use not affecting production, minimizing downtime. This allows for many events such as maintenance tasks (software updates or firmware) or performance troubleshooting issues that need addressed. Also enables you to perform rolling upgrades on your cluster nodes to upgrade you operating systems (ex 2012R2 to 2016). Backup Strategies have the opportunity to leverage the Hypervisor vs agent based backups. This allows for you to avoid overtaxing individual VMs during backup operations. And removing agent based backups from your environment is going to lessen the software footprint that has the possibility to create contention on resources.,HyperV could use better native tools for user to look into VM performance and health. Tools do exist but need improved to be competitive. Errors and Warning could be more visible in the Management View. Things like High CPU, Network peaks and Memory should be able to pop to the front when there is an issue.,10,There was an extreme positivity to migrating our environment to HyperV. The Hardware cost savings are exponential and Microsoft Licensing can also be a cost savings depending on how you license your hosts (Enterprise vs Data Center Licenses).,Veeam Backup & Replication, Windows ServerHyper-V is powerful and well integrated with Windows, albeit not the easiest or fastest virtualization software out there.I currently use Hyper-V with two clients to virtualize a number of different functions. Specifically, I have VMs acting as domain controllers, Linux servers, and a QuickBooks server. Using Hyper-V to virtualize these machines allows for more easy management, especially if a restart is required, as that can be done remotely without worry of the machine not turning back on. In addition, the entire VM can be backed up and restored in the case of a catastrophic failure. Finally, using Hyper-V allows me to have multiple single purposes machines running on a single higher powered physical machine.,Hyper-V is deeply integrated with Windows Server, and works with the built-in Windows Server backup software, as such a 3rd party backup solution is not required. In general, Hyper-V is easy to set up. There are a number of different options to choose from, but they are laid out in a logical manner and explained fairly well within the Hyper-V interface. Hyper-V's virtual disks (.vhdx) are extremely flexible and robust. They support dynamic resizing, i.e. you can create a 1TB disk that will show up as 1TB within the VM, but on the real machine the vhdx will only be as big as the amount of data within the VM. Microsoft provides a plethora of support documents for Hyper-V usage.,Hyper-V's support for non-Windows based OS' (i.e. Linux) is only OK. You can certainly virtualize a Linux machine, but it's integration with the rest of Windows is limited, and it's performance is only OK. Adding an external hard drive (USB or otherwise) to a VM is clunky at best, as it requires the physical to be set to offline via the Disk Management snap-in before it can be added to the VM. Backing up a VM can be lesson in frustration at times. While a VM can be easily backed up using Windows Server backup - when an issue arises with the backup, it can be very difficult tracking down exactly what the issue is.,7,Being able to use one higher powered machine to then virtualize a multitude of other machines has definitely saved on hardware costs. The exact amount, however, is difficult to calculate. Initial setup of Hyper-V can be time consuming, and setting up individual VM's is more time consuming than setting up a real machine. However, once the initial setup is done, overall time costs are lowered.,Parallels Desktop, VMware Fusion, VMware Workstation and VMware ESXi,Parallels Desktop, Dropbox Business, QuickBooks Enterprise Solutions, Adobe Acrobat DC, Microsoft Office 2016, TeamViewer, Code42 (formerly CrashPlan), BackblazeHyper-V Review from a Technical ConsultantHyper-V is being used by consultants like myself in our organization. Consultants often work for multiple different clients, each of which has different parameters for connecting to their systems. Some use VPNs or VMware, but others have their own VMs that we can manage locally with Hyper-V. This way we can conform to whatever standards the client requires with an image that they provide.,Switch Manager. Once you get your Hyper-V Manager set up, it is pretty easy to use the Virtual Switch Manager to toggle between different connection types for different VMs. It even allows you to change that switch configuration on a running instance without rebooting. Multiple VMs. It is very easy to maintain multiple VMs, hence the name "Manager" in Hyper-V Manager. Metrics. It is very easy to see the metrics for any specific instance. For example, the allocated memory, checkpoints, security settings, etc.,Initial Setup. Adding in new VMs is not an intuitive process. Going through the boot file, the ISO, and figuring out how to get that initial configuration right can be challenging. Stability. Overall, it's pretty stable, but I have had my VM crash unexpectedly more times than I expected. It's caused me to take certain precautions in how I handle the data that I keep on there. Connectivity. Although the Switch Manager is easy to use, establishing that initial connectivity within the VM can be tough. In a few instances, I had to do a number of resets and reboots in order to get it to work properly.,7,Positive: It saved my client money because they didn't have to provide an entire laptop for me. Instead, they just gave me a USB stick with an ISO file, which I used to load their image on my Hyper-V. Negative: Downtime. I have spent a lot of time troubleshooting connectivity and stability issues within Hyper-V. So although it saved them the initial money of not having to provide a separate laptop, a lot of money was spent in man-hours trying to troubleshoot other issues. Positive: Interfacing with the local system. How a VM interfaces with a local system can often be hit or miss. As an example, I'm referring to how easily it can copy/paste between the two systems. Hyper-V does this remarkably well, and it also handles screen sizing with ease.,VMware Horizon (formerly VMware View),Microsoft Power BI, Microsoft Access, Microsoft PowerApps, Microsoft SQL ServerA Great VMware AlternativeWe use Hyper-V as our preferred virtual machine solution. It got our organization off of physical servers and onto a modern format. The ease of conversion and use made Hyper-V the best program available to us. I never have had any problems with the software and have been very pleased with it overall.,Make changes on the go Easy to migrate to Great technical support,More in-depth options for further control of VMs Cost Clearer outline of future goals,8,It has lessened the need for physical servers It has provided us with a clearer layout of our environment It has simplified our backup environment,,JIRA Service Desk, Graylog, NagiosHyper-V is friend to CFO and SysAdmin alikeWe use Hyper-V in production as well as for testing. Hyper-V is handy because it's available on all Windows servers and it's free. Microsoft has created a pretty competitive product in the virtualization space. Its major competitor being VMware's ESXi. Hyper-V can be managed via SCVMM or individually on each host system. It has the native Windows look and feel to it, which is a real advantage for shortening learning curves and adoption. It's easy to implement, to use, and to manage. Microsoft has taken the financial sting out of virtualization by making it part of its server product. Hyper-V, like all virtualization technologies, makes business sense because it leverages hardware resources that would otherwise go wasted. For example, a standard database server might cost $8,000, but only might be utilized in the range of 30 to 40 percent. Virtualization takes that same $8,000 server and hosts many types of systems including the database system, which saves a lot of money on hardware infrastructure.,Hyper-V is native Windows, so it's optimized for the Windows platform. Virtual machines are very well behaved in this environment, which is a great benefit for administrators. Hyper-V is very easy to implement and to use. A short learning curve is essential for maintaining a high level of productivity in a business. Even the newest of administrators can become proficient almost immediately with Hyper-V. Hyper-V is flexible in which type of hardware you can use for host systems. This is especially cost-effective in businesses where IT budgets are already stretched. Being able to use a wide range of hardware systems as hosts helps maximize hardware utilization while keeping costs down because small shops don't have to go out and spend tens of thousands of dollars on the latest and greatest hardware. You can pretty much use what you have on hand, with few exceptions.,Hyper-V doesn't support some of the more cost-effective storage systems such as GlusterFS. It's unfortunate because while Hyper-V is certainly cost-effective, good leveraged storage solutions to support it are not. I wish Hyper-V had the capability similar to VMware's DRS so that VMs could move about to balance utilization without having to use SCVMM and SCOM to get similar capabilities. SCVMM and SCOM are really too expensive and heavy for smaller shops that need DRS without the overhead.,9,Although navigating Microsoft's licensing labyrinth is unpleasant, dealing with VMware's very high cost is a bigger problem. Choosing Hyper-V has saved us a lot of money that is better spent on software and support. Because Hyper-V is readily available, easy to implement, and easy to manage, it has saved us a lot of money on training. Just about any Windows administrator can use Hyper-V. After a few sessions, a competent administrator can be an expert. Some virtualization solutions require multiple expensive classes to gain that same level of knowledge. Hyper-V's lack of cost has allowed us to build an entire test environment for free. We can test migrations, test new software, and build VMs at will all in an environment that was essentially free. We used hardware that we had on hand and we already had Windows server licenses.,VMware ESXi and Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization,Splunk Enterprise, KnowBe4, Oracle VM VirtualBox, OpenVZHyper-V is the place to be for Virtualization if you are an SMBHyper-V has been our hypervisor of choice because of its fairly seamless integration with the rest of the Windows stack and its great price. We used it to consolidate our server farm into just a handful of actual physical servers. It is being used by our whole organization in that almost every piece of server infrastructure, except the hosts themselves, is hosted on a hyper-v server. Some are in clusters and some are standalone. It solves the need for additional hardware expense, space needed to house the servers and saves money when it comes to power consumption. In conjunction with Windows clustering, it also gives us an in-house live backup in that the virtual servers can run on any of our clustered hosts.,Hyper-V is both fairly easy to learn while being robust in its capability of taking one physical server and turning it into multiple functioning systems for user consumption. One of the gigantic strengths of Hyper-V is the fact that it is included with Windows Server. When used in conjunction with Windows Clustering, Hyper-V goes from just being a virtualization product to also being a Disaster Recovery product. Setting up multiple hosts in a cluster, if all of them have the capability of hosting all machines at once, allows one to know that if one host goes off line the other hosts will pick up the slack and keep the virtual instances running. Since Hyper-V is free and a MS product there is copious free support for it on the web. Most issues and questions can be dealt with just by doing some searching.,Hyper-V's snapshot feature can sometimes be a little clunky and cause issues removing the snapshots. Most problems are easily rectified but it is a weak point of the software. Host Servers that have Hyper-V installed on them, if there are a lot of servers, becoming fairly useless when it comes to being used for other functions...both in a literal sense and licensing sense. Despite the product being free with MS server, the new licensing scheme MS has available makes it more costly to host Hyper-V instances when one wants more than two per physical host.,10,Hyper-V has allowed us to take a small IT room and have it server up dozens of servers despite the lack of space available for hardware. Since it is basically free, any return from its use is a positive return on investment and the lessened power usage is a great way to show this when considering Hyper-v. We have had many instances of host machines blue screening or rebooting on their own and the clustering capability of Hyper-V, when used with Windows systems, has allowed these issues to be invisible to users.,VMware ESXi,Windows Server Failover Clustering, Sage 300 ERP, Procore, PlanGrid, Windows Server, Mimecast Enterprise Information Archiving, Symantec Endpoint ProtectionAll your Machines at one place.I use Hyper-V for my personal needs. I use it for the virtual environment of solving possible issues that can happen inside this virtual network. Such as DNS, IP conflict, sharing, and permissions. I had around 7 machines and one of them was a server machine. Hyper-V helps me to easily toggle between those machines and pinpoint the issue without any trouble.,Remote Connection works perfectly. It's easy to set up, control and maintain. Organizing your environment is really easy. You can label every machine and leave notes next to them so you don't get confused. Doesn't waste any necessary resources. It manages RAM and CPU usage pretty well, sleep option works like a charm.,It should be able to provide end user with a more convenient first setup of Virtual or remote Machine. It should be able to do this with machines on the local network. Some automatization is needed on the maintenance level, there is a lot of things that you have to do manually instead automatically.,8,There cannot be any negative impact, Hyper-V is a free tool that comes alongside Windows OS, be it a windows 7, 8 or 10. If you invest in coaching your staff to handle Hyper-V it could be a great return on investment.,VMware Player,VMware Player, VMware Workstation, Oracle Virtual Desktop InfrastructureEnterprise Level VirtualizationWe use Hyper-V (Windows Server 2016) to host our internal virtual server infrastructure. At the moment we use 4 Servers in a cluster to serve all our internal workloads. In addition, we consult our partners and customers in planning and implementation for Hyper-V as the virtualization platform. With Windows Server 2016 especially in combination with hyper-converged infrastructure with Storage Spaces Direct.,fast and easy deployment clustering with live migration direct integration in the OS,manageability (Windows Admin Center will solve this in future releases) monitoring of virtual machines performance,10,licensing physical server with Windows Server Datacenter also includes Windows Server licenses for virtual machines (unlimited),VMware ESXi,VMware Workstation, Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Acrobat DC,windows GUI Integration integration into Windows Admin Center full Powershell support for managing the infrastructure,no wizard based selection of vCPU Cores no default monitoring overview for virtual machines (without Windows Admin Center),No,8Hyper-V - Microsoft's virtualization productHyper-V is being used at remote locations to run multiple server instances on one physical box. This is being used across the organization at all remote locations. The business problem it addresses is providing a FREE (without system center) way to virtualize your environment.,FREE way to run multiple servers on one box Easy to use - Just copy/paste a virtual machine to the box, and get to configuring Integrates with other Microsoft products such as Active Directory,Like most other Microsoft products - having to find support can sometimes be challenging Wish there were more ways to interface with the host - i.e. using Hyper-V to see the computer as it boots up Backups are sometimes a challenge - either the virtual machine works....or it doesn't,8,Cost - We've been able to save money by deploying Hyper-V Speed - We've been able to quickly deploy servers at multiple locations Reliability - While the systems have been stable, a concern still exists that if something goes wrong we may have to turn to Google. Or contact Microsoft which isn't always as direct with their support.,VMware ESXi,VMware ESXi, VMware vCenter Server, AvamarHyperV Pro and ConsHyper-V is used for a part of our development environment. It is built into Microsoft Server and easy to use. Also used in a branch office. It gives us the ease of use with both installation/configuration and managing the VMs including taking backups.,Create VMs, move VMs around all with PowerShell. Creating snapshots is very easy, especially for our developers. Hyper-V is in itself a free product, which makes it also a good product to use it in studying from home to extend my own knowledge and experience,The license costs can go fast when using it in a failover environment. The virtual switch build into the product could have a better GUI for configuration I would a direct build in backup function,7,On the plus side, when having a datacenter license, you can very quickly create a virtual Microsoft environment. When you want to run SQL databases on it and have multiple Hyper-Vs you pay double which makes it less interesting from a ROI point of view Our dev department was helped by setting up a rather cost-saving solution to test their work on before using it in production.,Oracle VM VirtualBox, VMware ESXi and vSphere,PRTG Network Monitor, VMware ESXi, QualysguardHyper V working well!We use it to present multiple OSs on a single desktop, or on the network which is accessible to the entire company and employees. This is extremely useful to be able to use all platforms and all pieces of software we might need in order to customize scripts and coding the way we need to.,Running old software versions Multiple operating systems Testing and troubleshooting software apps Virtual networking,The digital virtualization platform could certainly use some work Bulk licensing Discounts,8,Consolidation Availability Reliability Agility,VMware,Dell Asset Manager, VMware EVO:RAIL, VMware NSX, Nutanix Acropolis, Nutanix Prism, NetApp All Flash FAS, NetApp FAS series, Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL), Red Hat Enterprise VirtualizationHyper-V, it doesn't give software testers time to go get a brew while things roll backWe use Hyper-V for production servers and virtualising test environments across the organisation. Testing For testing it allows us to quickly roll back a machine to a 'clean' environment, enabling us to guarantee testing from a known point. This is something that is done very regularly in our business as we are a software development house and need that guarantee that the test environment is not spoiled by a previous build of our software, or an operating system update. Servers Almost all of our servers are now virtualised, this helps us manage our physical environment by reducing the hardware requirements. It also allows virtualised machines to be ported with ease if a problem arises on the host server.,Checkpoints - used on a daily basis many times, we would be lost without this functionality. Flexibility - Hyper-V manages its hardware demands seamlessly distributing memory across the guest machines without compromising the guests or the host. Ease of administration - Tied into the Windows OS (Server and 10 now) it is very easy to get a virtual environment running.,Hyper-V Manager - our main Hyper-v server (for test VMs) has many virtual machines on it, and we find managing more than a handful of machines in the Hyper-V manager can become a little cumbersome.,10,Before Hyper-V, I had a computer under my desk and a version of Norton Ghost. To test a new release of our software involved me re-imaging that machine. This took about half a day and was just ONE machine. Hyper-V I have many developers connected to our Hyper-V server rolling machines back on-demand, with almost instant results. The impact of this has been huge on the level of testing our products get. We don't need to have a room full of servers, this has not only made our server room look a lot tidier, but has reduced our power requirements by not having to run many different 'real' servers.,Oracle VM VirtualBox, VMware Workstation and VMware Player,Windows Server, AutoCAD, Microsoft Dynamics CRMHyperactive Hyper-V Hyper-ReviewWe use Hyper-V across the entire organization. Everything that requires a server is virtualized, and Hyper-V makes it easy to configure a fault-tolerant cluster for a very low price. With replication, we also don’t worry as much about downtime or data loss.,Easy to configure. Free with every copy of Windows Server Dynamically adjustable memory on the VMs,Clustering can be tricky to configure Replication sometimes fails and needs to be reconfigured. Easy to lose track of VMs created. Built-in backup tools inadequate.,9,Minimized hardware costs Maximized availabilityHyper-V... fast and easyOur customers use Hyper-V for scenarios where the cost associated with VMWare solutions is simply not advantageous. It is a simple to use hypervisor packed with enterprise functionality.,Easy to use Easy to deploy Cloud consistent Fully integrated with Microsoft management tooling,Overall memory management is still not as advanced as VMware ESX. The virtual thread model used by the hypervisor has improved but does not maximize the true power of the host CPU. The model for over-contention of CPU allows for significant overutilization leading to bad performance.,9,ROI has been amazing for server consolidation projects.,VMware ESXi, XenServer, Kernel-based Virtual Machine, Oracle VM VirtualBox and VMware Fusion,Microsoft Azure, Sophos Endpoint Protection, Sophos UTMHyper-V ReviewWe use Hyper-V to support our private cloud for development and consulting purposes. Using Hyper-V provides us tremendous flexibility. We're able to run many VMs on a single host and use it to replicate many different environments for testing.,I like the snapshot feature where you can take a snapshot of the VM and later apply that snapshot if you want to roll back your changes. The dynamic memory is a very nice feature. This allows the host computer to allocate memory to a VM as it is needed. It is nice being able to use PowerShell to manage the hyper-v service and the VM management process.,There is nothing that I'd like to see done differently. It is simply a great product.,10,We were able to build environments that we used for software development. These environments could then be customized, turned off, and saved for later use. Months could then go by and when the environment was restarted it was great to know that the software would be in exactly the same state as when we last used it. We use VMs for demo purposes. These environments too are configured, backed up, and then shut down. When we need to do a demo we can easily spin up an environment and be confident that the demo will run smoothly.,,Azure SQL Database, Axure, BalsamiqHyper-V, the bestHyper-V is used across our whole organization as well as across the organizations of our main big customers. It is obviously used for virtualizing the servers. It makes sure we can easily set up redundancy and fail-over. tI also enables us to easily backup and restore in case of DR, even to different hardware.,using single jbods attached to several physical servers fail-over legacy OS snapshots,attach USB devices,9,The ROI is mainly felt when you recover from hardware failure which requires a new server. You also get great profit when you need several servers. If you use the fully licensed version you also make good returns on the OSs which don't need further licensing.,VMWare,Eset Smart Security, Symantec Backup Exec, Symantec Endpoint ProtectionHyper-V is not ready for prime time, but has merits in SMB or small workload scenariosWe began to make an entire conversion to Hyper-V over the last 2 years for our new DC and also our remote locations. The problem it was supposed to solve was the increasing cost of VMware.,Lower cost if you are a MS Windows shop. You have to license Windows anyway so if you have a data-center license you get the rights to use unlimited Hyper-V on that host.,Third party support is lacking. It is easy to get third party tools and support for VMware, but not so with Hyper-V. Uses too many resources. Unless you run 2016 nano it is still to bloaty and consumes too much of the available host resources. Typically 4-8GB compared to less than 1GB for VMware. Requires third party plugins to get good monitoring of resources. VMM is the equivalent to vCenter and it pales in comparison. It is for more complex to use and is extremely bloated and slow. Nothing is intuitive and the complexity means you are more likely going to make mistakes or have issues. Backing up VMs is difficult unless you have a fully supported guest and properly running integration services. Hyper-V does not support crash consistent snaps like VMware does and will often pause the running VM it it can not get a clean snap. This is clearly unacceptable in a mission critical environment.,3,The allure of Hyper-V is its initial cost, but the real TCO is not as clear as the skills required are hard to come by and the overall reliability due to complexity wind up being less. For simple single server installations the ROI may be valid, but you must look at all aspects of supportablility and possibly having split trained staff.,VMware ESXi,VMware ESXi, CommVault, HP 3PAR StoreServ Flash StorageWhy Hyper-V might be for youWe use Hyper-V for development VMs as well as for production VMs. I run, manage and help developers use our 600+ development VMs including all the underlying infrastructure.,Use of scripting to create and automate VM creation and management. Powershell is one of the best scripting languages there is and Hyper-V like all Microsoft products supports it out of the box. Integration via Virtual Machine Manager. The real power of Hyper-V is when you pair it with VMM. You then get easy templating and a lot of other more advanced features. Since Windows Server 2016, Hyper-V clusters support automatic load balancing between nodes.,Hyper-V clusters are really not reliable enough if you need 24/7 operation. We encountered a lot of hardware failure which resulted in the cluster restarting all the nodes (even the nodes which were OK) which is kind of the opposite goal of clusters. Poor support for less popular Linux OS like Arch Linux. Practically no features when used without Virtual Machine Manager. No templates, no user management, no balancing (Except on Windows Server 2016), etc.,6,We experienced a lot of hardware problems which resulted in restart of all the nodes which is the exact opposite of what I think a cluster should do. Thanks to Hyper-V, we are able to fully utilize our hardware and therefore cram our 600+ VMs on our 10 hosts. Thanks to Microsoft developer program we can run most of our developer VMs for a really competitive price.,VMware,VMmanager, Slack, Microsoft SQL ServerNative virtualization which saves your time and moneyI have been using Hyper-V for about half a year for creating clusters on Linux (RedHat, Ubuntu).,Very satisfied with the results: simplicity, reliability and its speed of work.,But found several cons: absence of drag-and-drop, clipboard also does not work, therefore there is no possibility to copy-paste files from my PC to Hyper-V. Can do this only via RDP but it takes some work: install XRDP, open ports. So, per my point of view it needs refinement to make such things easier.,8,Sometimes the live backup fails with an error and I am forced to shut down the server to make the offline backup with its downtime. It is not critical for a cluster, but very critical when you have only one working server.,,VMware ESXi, Oracle VM VirtualBox, Vagrant
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May 24, 2019

Virtualization is made simple with Hyper-V

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We use Hyper-V across our whole organization. We have multiple Windows and Linux servers running as virtual machines on Hyper-V. Almost all servers are run as virtual machines. It allows us to easily spin up new servers as needed, and easily decommission older servers.
  • Hyper-V is very easy to administer. Day-to-day operations are done through the Hyper-V Manager, which is simple and intuitive to use.
  • It allows complete servers to be easily be backed up to either local storage or cloud storage (or both). You can restore whole virtual machines as well as individual files if needed.
  • It is simple to create a checkpoint of a virtual machine before any changes are made or updates applied and changes can be easily rolled back if needed.
  • Hyper-V does require adequate CPU and memory and should be used with fast storage, so plan ahead.
  • It would be nice if there was a way to upgrade virtual machines from generation 1 to generation 2.
  • Also, better support for older operating systems.
It has been a superb environment for the virtualization of our infrastructure. We have gone from many separate, stand-alone servers to primarily virtual machine based servers without any problems. We have reduced hardware costs, allowed much easier scale-ability, and provided more comprehensive backup and disaster recovery plans with few hindrances.
Read Al Oomens's full review
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May 10, 2019

Hyper-V

Score 10 out of 10
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We chose Hyper-V to create our virtual infrastructure for our on premise servers. Our current hardware was at end of life and had the opportunity to upgrade to newer hardware and have enough space for more servers.
  • Virtual Environment
  • Scale-ability
  • Ease of use
  • None that I have noticed.
We had limited space for physical servers and the hardware space needed for the virtual environment only utilized half of the space the on premise servers used.
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March 07, 2019

Hyper-V: Free with Datacenter

Score 7 out of 10
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Hyper-V was used across the enterprise at my previous job. It consisted of a three-host cluster with over 1TB ram and 200TB of production storage. It also included over 200 VMs running Windows Server 2016 RD Datacenter.
  • Hyper-V is better than having a lot of physical boxes and hardware.
  • Hyper-V is priced well; meaning if you buy a Datacenter center license its free for unlimited, the standard is up to 3 VMs.
  • You can buy single VM licenses to add to standard in lieu of Datacenter license. I think the cost equals out after 8 single VM purchases, so if you plan on running more than 8-10 VMs you may want to look at Datacenter.
  • Hyper-V is behind the curve in terms of live migration. I feel that the winner for this is VMWare.
  • This is a Microsoft based program, so getting support on it can prove more difficult than others. More than likely you'll get quicker support from your reseller.
  • Hyper-V was awful in 2008, it started getting better in 2012 and was pretty good in 2016, but still inferior to VMWare.
If you have a limited budget, this will be a tossup with KVM Open Source Hypervisor.
Read Michael Haberkern's full review
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May 17, 2019

Hyper-V is the happy middle point

Score 8 out of 10
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We're a small IT operation in the higher education industry. We use Hyper-V as our primary production-grade virtualization tool. While it may not be as feature-packed as other options, it does what we need. At the end of the day we're just trying to virtualize infrastructure, and do not even need fancy high availability tools or near-real time replication. Just run more servers on less physical hardware.
  • Windows Server Virtualization
  • Windows Server Configuring
  • Uptime
  • Microsoft Licensing is Complicated
  • Harder to configure real-time migration
  • Focus on Microsoft products, support is weak for non-Microsoft systems
In education Hyper-V is still the best bet. In our case, it's included in our regular Microsoft licenses. VMware is a whole different issue when it comes to licensing and adds significant cost in our situation. The hardware requirements are also different for VMware. The big question is what you need versus what the virtualization software company wants to make you think you need.
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May 22, 2019

Hyper-V built into Windows for free

Score 8 out of 10
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We have configured stand-alone Hyper-V servers and failover Hyper-V clusters. All of our servers are currently running under Hyper-V. From a cost perspective, all servers running windows under the Hyper-V node are free as long as you have a Windows datacenter license. This helps us keep costs down, and allows us to spin up new servers without additional licensing costs for the OS.
  • Live migration.
  • High availability.
  • Easily create new VMS.
  • Dynamically adjust RAM.
  • Troubleshooting can be difficult.
  • Occasional live migration failures are causing all other VM's to fail.
  • A fair bit of setup is needed to get a cluster configured and up.
I've always had good success with Hyper-V. Since we moved to Windows 2016, we have had issues with Windows updates taking hours to install. The server will sit at "please wait," while updates are installed for hours. It used to be minutes with Windows 2012R2. As a result, updating our Hyper-V servers takes an entire day instead of hours. Hopefully, this issue will be resolved with Windows 2019 Hyper-V.
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April 04, 2019

Great Hypervisor for IT and More

Score 9 out of 10
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Hyper-V is our bare-metal hypervisors. Anything that we run on-premise resides on a Hyper-V virtual machine. Our Hyper-V implementation is simple, with local storage on the servers and no failover clustering.
  • Hyper-V is free. Totally free. No feature limits aside from the lack of a GUI on the server itself, but so long as you have a Windows workstation, you can manage it remotely.
  • Remote management is excellent, and the default way to interact with the hypervisor.
  • PowerShell is extensively supported and very powerful. If you have complex needs or like to get your hands dirty, the tools are very powerful.
  • It's a very stable platform. Our hypervisors require so little maintenance it's a dream. And the virtual machines are also stable and fast.
  • There are some options not present in the GUI tools. It seems features are implemented with PowerShell commands before being brought to the GUI.
  • Hyper-V will sometimes be a bit slower to pick up new virtualization technologies like GPU sharing, as compared with VMware or even Microsoft's own Azure.
Hyper-V has been a very reliable hypervisor for use in an IT organization. It's free, well documented, and powerful. Where it may fall short is in a Linux shop, where existing tools and skills would be better spent on a nix hypervisor. Virtual networking support on Hyper-V is also not as advanced as something like VMware, potentially important for web hosting projects.
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November 30, 2018

HyperV The Hypervisor Solution

Score 10 out of 10
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HyperV became the Virtualization choice to replace or migrate as many systems to a Virtual Environment. This decision spanned the entire company. The largest business problem it solved was the physical space and requirements needed to continue to use physical servers. It also addressed the increasing complexity of server management. High Density computing offers many advantage and can deliver a substantial cost savings when compared.
  • Virtual Machine Management and Resource Management is very good. You can adjust many resources while the VM is running and take Advantage of reducing impact to production. For example you can grow a virtual hard drive "hot", even when its larger than 2TB.
  • Cluster Management is very easy to set up and allows you to "live migrate resources" while in use not affecting production, minimizing downtime. This allows for many events such as maintenance tasks (software updates or firmware) or performance troubleshooting issues that need addressed.
  • Also enables you to perform rolling upgrades on your cluster nodes to upgrade you operating systems (ex 2012R2 to 2016).
  • Backup Strategies have the opportunity to leverage the Hypervisor vs agent based backups. This allows for you to avoid overtaxing individual VMs during backup operations. And removing agent based backups from your environment is going to lessen the software footprint that has the possibility to create contention on resources.
  • HyperV could use better native tools for user to look into VM performance and health. Tools do exist but need improved to be competitive.
  • Errors and Warning could be more visible in the Management View. Things like High CPU, Network peaks and Memory should be able to pop to the front when there is an issue.
HyperV is well suited for most environments. Most system engineers or business owners can take advantage of the quick learning cycle with the product. There are a lot of online resources available. It is a great functional, low cost and viable solution. Small Business or Enterprise can adopt this technology without much concern. If your Virtual Machines have a requirement to be hosted on a Linux based host then perhaps you should use a competitor software versus HyperV, but I have not seen this as an issue very frequently.
Read Michael Jipping's full review
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November 29, 2018

Hyper-V is powerful and well integrated with Windows, albeit not the easiest or fastest virtualization software out there.

Score 7 out of 10
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I currently use Hyper-V with two clients to virtualize a number of different functions. Specifically, I have VMs acting as domain controllers, Linux servers, and a QuickBooks server. Using Hyper-V to virtualize these machines allows for more easy management, especially if a restart is required, as that can be done remotely without worry of the machine not turning back on. In addition, the entire VM can be backed up and restored in the case of a catastrophic failure. Finally, using Hyper-V allows me to have multiple single purposes machines running on a single higher powered physical machine.
  • Hyper-V is deeply integrated with Windows Server, and works with the built-in Windows Server backup software, as such a 3rd party backup solution is not required.
  • In general, Hyper-V is easy to set up. There are a number of different options to choose from, but they are laid out in a logical manner and explained fairly well within the Hyper-V interface.
  • Hyper-V's virtual disks (.vhdx) are extremely flexible and robust. They support dynamic resizing, i.e. you can create a 1TB disk that will show up as 1TB within the VM, but on the real machine the vhdx will only be as big as the amount of data within the VM.
  • Microsoft provides a plethora of support documents for Hyper-V usage.
  • Hyper-V's support for non-Windows based OS' (i.e. Linux) is only OK. You can certainly virtualize a Linux machine, but it's integration with the rest of Windows is limited, and it's performance is only OK.
  • Adding an external hard drive (USB or otherwise) to a VM is clunky at best, as it requires the physical to be set to offline via the Disk Management snap-in before it can be added to the VM.
  • Backing up a VM can be lesson in frustration at times. While a VM can be easily backed up using Windows Server backup - when an issue arises with the backup, it can be very difficult tracking down exactly what the issue is.
Virtualizing a Windows Server via Hyper-V works really well. I especially like using it to virtualize a domain controller that requires 100% up time. While you can use Hyper-V on a regular non-server version of Windows Pro, it isn't as tightly integrated and some features aren't available (such as being able to be backed up using built-in software). Finally, I would NOT recommend using Hyper-V to virtualize a non-Windows OS machine.
Read Aaron Pinsker's full review
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January 18, 2019

Hyper-V Review from a Technical Consultant

Score 7 out of 10
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Hyper-V is being used by consultants like myself in our organization. Consultants often work for multiple different clients, each of which has different parameters for connecting to their systems. Some use VPNs or VMware, but others have their own VMs that we can manage locally with Hyper-V. This way we can conform to whatever standards the client requires with an image that they provide.
  • Switch Manager. Once you get your Hyper-V Manager set up, it is pretty easy to use the Virtual Switch Manager to toggle between different connection types for different VMs. It even allows you to change that switch configuration on a running instance without rebooting.
  • Multiple VMs. It is very easy to maintain multiple VMs, hence the name "Manager" in Hyper-V Manager.
  • Metrics. It is very easy to see the metrics for any specific instance. For example, the allocated memory, checkpoints, security settings, etc.
  • Initial Setup. Adding in new VMs is not an intuitive process. Going through the boot file, the ISO, and figuring out how to get that initial configuration right can be challenging.
  • Stability. Overall, it's pretty stable, but I have had my VM crash unexpectedly more times than I expected. It's caused me to take certain precautions in how I handle the data that I keep on there.
  • Connectivity. Although the Switch Manager is easy to use, establishing that initial connectivity within the VM can be tough. In a few instances, I had to do a number of resets and reboots in order to get it to work properly.
Well-Suited
1) Multiple VMs to manage. It works well if you have multiple VMs to manage, and don't have external software to connect to them (and would rather maintain them locally).
2) Specific images required. In the consulting world, if a client requires a specific OS image for their work, Hyper-V is perfect for maintaining that image.

Less Appropriate
1) No image required. If the work that you do doesn't require a specific image, but rather just access to propriety data and systems, online portals might be a better option.
2) High levels of security. If you have a setup that requires token authentication, MFA, etc., maintaining all of that through an instance on Hyper-V can be challenging.
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November 21, 2018

A Great VMware Alternative

Score 8 out of 10
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We use Hyper-V as our preferred virtual machine solution. It got our organization off of physical servers and onto a modern format. The ease of conversion and use made Hyper-V the best program available to us. I never have had any problems with the software and have been very pleased with it overall.
  • Make changes on the go
  • Easy to migrate to
  • Great technical support
  • More in-depth options for further control of VMs
  • Cost
  • Clearer outline of future goals
It is a great application if you are looking for an alternative to VMware. I honestly do prefer VMware but Hyper-V does a good job of getting the job done.
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August 09, 2018

Hyper-V is friend to CFO and SysAdmin alike

Score 9 out of 10
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We use Hyper-V in production as well as for testing. Hyper-V is handy because it's available on all Windows servers and it's free. Microsoft has created a pretty competitive product in the virtualization space. Its major competitor being VMware's ESXi. Hyper-V can be managed via SCVMM or individually on each host system. It has the native Windows look and feel to it, which is a real advantage for shortening learning curves and adoption. It's easy to implement, to use, and to manage. Microsoft has taken the financial sting out of virtualization by making it part of its server product. Hyper-V, like all virtualization technologies, makes business sense because it leverages hardware resources that would otherwise go wasted. For example, a standard database server might cost $8,000, but only might be utilized in the range of 30 to 40 percent. Virtualization takes that same $8,000 server and hosts many types of systems including the database system, which saves a lot of money on hardware infrastructure.
  • Hyper-V is native Windows, so it's optimized for the Windows platform. Virtual machines are very well behaved in this environment, which is a great benefit for administrators.
  • Hyper-V is very easy to implement and to use. A short learning curve is essential for maintaining a high level of productivity in a business. Even the newest of administrators can become proficient almost immediately with Hyper-V.
  • Hyper-V is flexible in which type of hardware you can use for host systems. This is especially cost-effective in businesses where IT budgets are already stretched. Being able to use a wide range of hardware systems as hosts helps maximize hardware utilization while keeping costs down because small shops don't have to go out and spend tens of thousands of dollars on the latest and greatest hardware. You can pretty much use what you have on hand, with few exceptions.
  • Hyper-V doesn't support some of the more cost-effective storage systems such as GlusterFS. It's unfortunate because while Hyper-V is certainly cost-effective, good leveraged storage solutions to support it are not.
  • I wish Hyper-V had the capability similar to VMware's DRS so that VMs could move about to balance utilization without having to use SCVMM and SCOM to get similar capabilities. SCVMM and SCOM are really too expensive and heavy for smaller shops that need DRS without the overhead.
Hyper-V is well-suited to smaller environments and those that have budgetary constraints. It's also very good for those businesses that need an inexpensive virtualization solution but also doesn't want to go open source. There are a few limitations with using Hyper-V but careful planning and good administration can overcome most of them. If I were asked to build a large (>100 systems) mission-critical environment, I wouldn't use Hyper-V. It's good for smaller installations, but VMware is really more scalable and better suited to large environments. Some might disagree that Hyper-V falls short but for my money, VMware is the better choice in those situations. I really like Hyper-V, but you have to be ready to make some concessions for its shortcomings.
Read Kenneth Hess's full review
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March 15, 2018

Hyper-V is the place to be for Virtualization if you are an SMB

Score 10 out of 10
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Hyper-V has been our hypervisor of choice because of its fairly seamless integration with the rest of the Windows stack and its great price. We used it to consolidate our server farm into just a handful of actual physical servers. It is being used by our whole organization in that almost every piece of server infrastructure, except the hosts themselves, is hosted on a hyper-v server. Some are in clusters and some are standalone. It solves the need for additional hardware expense, space needed to house the servers and saves money when it comes to power consumption. In conjunction with Windows clustering, it also gives us an in-house live backup in that the virtual servers can run on any of our clustered hosts.
  • Hyper-V is both fairly easy to learn while being robust in its capability of taking one physical server and turning it into multiple functioning systems for user consumption.
  • One of the gigantic strengths of Hyper-V is the fact that it is included with Windows Server.
  • When used in conjunction with Windows Clustering, Hyper-V goes from just being a virtualization product to also being a Disaster Recovery product. Setting up multiple hosts in a cluster, if all of them have the capability of hosting all machines at once, allows one to know that if one host goes off line the other hosts will pick up the slack and keep the virtual instances running.
  • Since Hyper-V is free and a MS product there is copious free support for it on the web. Most issues and questions can be dealt with just by doing some searching.
  • Hyper-V's snapshot feature can sometimes be a little clunky and cause issues removing the snapshots. Most problems are easily rectified but it is a weak point of the software.
  • Host Servers that have Hyper-V installed on them, if there are a lot of servers, becoming fairly useless when it comes to being used for other functions...both in a literal sense and licensing sense.
  • Despite the product being free with MS server, the new licensing scheme MS has available makes it more costly to host Hyper-V instances when one wants more than two per physical host.
Hyper-V is well suited for shops that are not completely sold into using VMWare for its virtualization needs. There is some limitation on using some hardware with Hyper-V but when it comes to every day server user, the Hyper-V technology is so mature that almost any in house scenario can benefit from its use. Whether it is for space, power or DR reasons.

The only time I can think it would be less appropriate is the case where someone wants a server to have full, un limited access to a hardware based disc system and does not want any competition for the use of the system.
Read Jeffrey Rudacille's full review
Stefan Trbojevic profile photo
August 16, 2018

All your Machines at one place.

Score 8 out of 10
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I use Hyper-V for my personal needs. I use it for the virtual environment of solving possible issues that can happen inside this virtual network. Such as DNS, IP conflict, sharing, and permissions. I had around 7 machines and one of them was a server machine. Hyper-V helps me to easily toggle between those machines and pinpoint the issue without any trouble.
  • Remote Connection works perfectly. It's easy to set up, control and maintain.
  • Organizing your environment is really easy. You can label every machine and leave notes next to them so you don't get confused.
  • Doesn't waste any necessary resources. It manages RAM and CPU usage pretty well, sleep option works like a charm.
  • It should be able to provide end user with a more convenient first setup of Virtual or remote Machine. It should be able to do this with machines on the local network.
  • Some automatization is needed on the maintenance level, there is a lot of things that you have to do manually instead automatically.
Hyper-V is well suited for some larger scale networks and projects. It shouldn't be used in any case as a Virtual player for one single virtual machine. So the downside of Hyper-V would be its lack of awareness for a single Virtual machine but better usage overall for a great number of machines.

Hyper-V is good for maintaining real networks and connecting to the servers.
Read Stefan Trbojevic's full review
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June 05, 2018

Enterprise Level Virtualization

Score 10 out of 10
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We use Hyper-V (Windows Server 2016) to host our internal virtual server infrastructure. At the moment we use 4 Servers in a cluster to serve all our internal workloads. In addition, we consult our partners and customers in planning and implementation for Hyper-V as the virtualization platform. With Windows Server 2016 especially in combination with hyper-converged infrastructure with Storage Spaces Direct.
  • fast and easy deployment
  • clustering with live migration
  • direct integration in the OS
  • manageability (Windows Admin Center will solve this in future releases)
  • monitoring of virtual machines performance
Well suited:
  • Virtualization of internal infrastructure
  • Virtualizing Windows OS
  • SQL Server hosting

Less appropriate:
  • Hosting Linux web server farms
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April 30, 2018

Hyper-V - Microsoft's virtualization product

Score 8 out of 10
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Hyper-V is being used at remote locations to run multiple server instances on one physical box. This is being used across the organization at all remote locations. The business problem it addresses is providing a FREE (without system center) way to virtualize your environment.
  • FREE way to run multiple servers on one box
  • Easy to use - Just copy/paste a virtual machine to the box, and get to configuring
  • Integrates with other Microsoft products such as Active Directory
  • Like most other Microsoft products - having to find support can sometimes be challenging
  • Wish there were more ways to interface with the host - i.e. using Hyper-V to see the computer as it boots up
  • Backups are sometimes a challenge - either the virtual machine works....or it doesn't
If your in-house talent is very good with Microsoft products, and comfortable with dealing with problems that come up themselves, and have a tight budget - Microsoft Hyper-V works well. If your company would prefer to have a more reliable support contact - then VMWare may be a better option.
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April 26, 2018

HyperV Pro and Cons

Score 7 out of 10
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Hyper-V is used for a part of our development environment. It is built into Microsoft Server and easy to use. Also used in a branch office. It gives us the ease of use with both installation/configuration and managing the VMs including taking backups.
  • Create VMs, move VMs around all with PowerShell.
  • Creating snapshots is very easy, especially for our developers.
  • Hyper-V is in itself a free product, which makes it also a good product to use it in studying from home to extend my own knowledge and experience
  • The license costs can go fast when using it in a failover environment.
  • The virtual switch build into the product could have a better GUI for configuration
  • I would a direct build in backup function
Hyper-V is easy to use as a solution for a DTAP environment. For a small business, it is also suited well to run multiple VMs on just one server. In that case, it can function as an infrastructure solution. It is less suited to work in an environment with different hypervisors; it is not easy to migrate from VMWare to Hyper-V and vice versa.
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April 09, 2018

Hyper V working well!

Score 8 out of 10
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We use it to present multiple OSs on a single desktop, or on the network which is accessible to the entire company and employees. This is extremely useful to be able to use all platforms and all pieces of software we might need in order to customize scripts and coding the way we need to.
  • Running old software versions
  • Multiple operating systems
  • Testing and troubleshooting software apps
  • Virtual networking
  • The digital virtualization platform could certainly use some work
  • Bulk licensing
  • Discounts
Since Hypervisor technology is software on which multiple virtual machines can run, we use this very effectively for resource allocation to our virtual machines and our virtual desktop infrastructure platform, which is run on Nutanix, with Hyper V performing the sizing and allocation of compute, storage, and manual laborers that are needed.
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September 18, 2017

Hyper-V, it doesn't give software testers time to go get a brew while things roll back

Score 10 out of 10
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We use Hyper-V for production servers and virtualising test environments across the organisation.

Testing
For testing it allows us to quickly roll back a machine to a 'clean' environment, enabling us to guarantee testing from a known point. This is something that is done very regularly in our business as we are a software development house and need that guarantee that the test environment is not spoiled by a previous build of our software, or an operating system update.

Servers
Almost all of our servers are now virtualised, this helps us manage our physical environment by reducing the hardware requirements. It also allows virtualised machines to be ported with ease if a problem arises on the host server.
  • Checkpoints - used on a daily basis many times, we would be lost without this functionality.
  • Flexibility - Hyper-V manages its hardware demands seamlessly distributing memory across the guest machines without compromising the guests or the host.
  • Ease of administration - Tied into the Windows OS (Server and 10 now) it is very easy to get a virtual environment running.
  • Hyper-V Manager - our main Hyper-v server (for test VMs) has many virtual machines on it, and we find managing more than a handful of machines in the Hyper-V manager can become a little cumbersome.
Hyper-V works really well when you have a machine that you want to roll back on a regular basis, for purposes such as testing software. In some situations, such as hosting graphics-intensive applications, Hyper-V (while having RemoteFX available in some environments) can be an unnecessary piece of the puzzle where a 'real' machine would be more appropriate.
Read Peter Anderson BEng MCSA's full review
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October 10, 2017

Hyperactive Hyper-V Hyper-Review

Score 9 out of 10
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We use Hyper-V across the entire organization. Everything that requires a server is virtualized, and Hyper-V makes it easy to configure a fault-tolerant cluster for a very low price. With replication, we also don’t worry as much about downtime or data loss.
  • Easy to configure.
  • Free with every copy of Windows Server
  • Dynamically adjustable memory on the VMs
  • Clustering can be tricky to configure
  • Replication sometimes fails and needs to be reconfigured.
  • Easy to lose track of VMs created.
  • Built-in backup tools inadequate.
Great for small to medium-sized offices with modest needs. Once you get to large businesses, managing and configuring your VMs requires dedicated staff.
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September 22, 2017

Hyper-V... fast and easy

Score 9 out of 10
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Our customers use Hyper-V for scenarios where the cost associated with VMWare solutions is simply not advantageous. It is a simple to use hypervisor packed with enterprise functionality.
  • Easy to use
  • Easy to deploy
  • Cloud consistent
  • Fully integrated with Microsoft management tooling
  • Overall memory management is still not as advanced as VMware ESX.
  • The virtual thread model used by the hypervisor has improved but does not maximize the true power of the host CPU.
  • The model for over-contention of CPU allows for significant overutilization leading to bad performance.
Hyper-V is incredibly well suited for proof of concepts, mixed hardware clusters, and low-cost server consolidation. It is not well suited for scenarios requiring high-speed memory access.
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September 18, 2017

Hyper-V Review

Score 10 out of 10
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We use Hyper-V to support our private cloud for development and consulting purposes. Using Hyper-V provides us tremendous flexibility. We're able to run many VMs on a single host and use it to replicate many different environments for testing.
  • I like the snapshot feature where you can take a snapshot of the VM and later apply that snapshot if you want to roll back your changes.
  • The dynamic memory is a very nice feature. This allows the host computer to allocate memory to a VM as it is needed.
  • It is nice being able to use PowerShell to manage the hyper-v service and the VM management process.
  • There is nothing that I'd like to see done differently. It is simply a great product.
Hyper-V is well suited for development. One is able to stand up VMs to replicate an environment using a single host computer. You can then shut the VMs down, back them up, snapshot them, and roll them back to a previous snapshot. The entire process can be automated using PowerShell as well.
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November 21, 2017

Hyper-V, the best

Score 9 out of 10
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Hyper-V is used across our whole organization as well as across the organizations of our main big customers. It is obviously used for virtualizing the servers. It makes sure we can easily set up redundancy and fail-over. tI also enables us to easily backup and restore in case of DR, even to different hardware.
  • using single jbods attached to several physical servers
  • fail-over
  • legacy OS
  • snapshots
  • attach USB devices
Any organization big enough to use AD should install it on top of Hyper-V in my opinion to streamline Disaster Recovery scenarios. Also when several server roles are needed it should be used to install then across different (virtual) instances. It is also great for test environments as you can install, or even re-image pre-installed, OSs
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May 02, 2017

Hyper-V is not ready for prime time, but has merits in SMB or small workload scenarios

Score 3 out of 10
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We began to make an entire conversion to Hyper-V over the last 2 years for our new DC and also our remote locations. The problem it was supposed to solve was the increasing cost of VMware.
  • Lower cost if you are a MS Windows shop. You have to license Windows anyway so if you have a data-center license you get the rights to use unlimited Hyper-V on that host.
  • Third party support is lacking. It is easy to get third party tools and support for VMware, but not so with Hyper-V.
  • Uses too many resources. Unless you run 2016 nano it is still to bloaty and consumes too much of the available host resources. Typically 4-8GB compared to less than 1GB for VMware.
  • Requires third party plugins to get good monitoring of resources.
  • VMM is the equivalent to vCenter and it pales in comparison. It is for more complex to use and is extremely bloated and slow. Nothing is intuitive and the complexity means you are more likely going to make mistakes or have issues.
  • Backing up VMs is difficult unless you have a fully supported guest and properly running integration services. Hyper-V does not support crash consistent snaps like VMware does and will often pause the running VM it it can not get a clean snap. This is clearly unacceptable in a mission critical environment.
Hyper-V is best used in an SMB or remote office scenario where you have a standalone server. Clustering Hyper-V is not as intuitive as VMware and thus a single server install is far easier to set up and support. If you run a lean staff Hyper-V may not be for you because finding people that are decent with Hyper-V is difficult. The future is more cloud oriented and thus people will be focused on that vs. Hyper-V.
Read Keith Luken's full review
Marc-Olivier Turgeon-Ferland profile photo
July 24, 2017

Why Hyper-V might be for you

Score 6 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
We use Hyper-V for development VMs as well as for production VMs. I run, manage and help developers use our 600+ development VMs including all the underlying infrastructure.
  • Use of scripting to create and automate VM creation and management. Powershell is one of the best scripting languages there is and Hyper-V like all Microsoft products supports it out of the box.
  • Integration via Virtual Machine Manager. The real power of Hyper-V is when you pair it with VMM. You then get easy templating and a lot of other more advanced features.
  • Since Windows Server 2016, Hyper-V clusters support automatic load balancing between nodes.
  • Hyper-V clusters are really not reliable enough if you need 24/7 operation. We encountered a lot of hardware failure which resulted in the cluster restarting all the nodes (even the nodes which were OK) which is kind of the opposite goal of clusters.
  • Poor support for less popular Linux OS like Arch Linux.
  • Practically no features when used without Virtual Machine Manager. No templates, no user management, no balancing (Except on Windows Server 2016), etc.
If you need a cheap hypervisor for development purposes or production which does not require 24/7 operation and are running mostly Windows VMs, Hyper-V is hard to beat but if you need reliability and performance, Hyper-V is not the right choice for you.
Read Marc-Olivier Turgeon-Ferland's full review
Kostyantyn Khomko profile photo
July 21, 2017

Native virtualization which saves your time and money

Score 8 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
I have been using Hyper-V for about half a year for creating clusters on Linux (RedHat, Ubuntu).
  • Very satisfied with the results: simplicity, reliability and its speed of work.
  • But found several cons: absence of drag-and-drop, clipboard also does not work, therefore there is no possibility to copy-paste files from my PC to Hyper-V. Can do this only via RDP but it takes some work: install XRDP, open ports. So, per my point of view it needs refinement to make such things easier.
Well suited for managing Windows Servers and also for Linux. Less appropriate for FreeBSD and MacOS.
Read Kostyantyn Khomko's full review

Feature Scorecard Summary

Virtual machine automated provisioning (32)
7.6
Management console (37)
7.8
Live virtual machine backup (33)
8.2
Live virtual machine migration (36)
8.2
Hypervisor-level security (34)
8.0

About Hyper-V

Categories:  Server Virtualization

Hyper-V Integrations

Hyper-V Technical Details

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Mobile Application:No