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https://dudodiprj2sv7.cloudfront.net/product-logos/VW/gd/DN0EUOTT0D1R.pngHyperV The Hypervisor SolutionHyperV became the Virtualization choice to replace or migrate as many systems to a Virtual Environment. This decision spanned the entire company. The largest business problem it solved was the physical space and requirements needed to continue to use physical servers. It also addressed the increasing complexity of server management. High Density computing offers many advantage and can deliver a substantial cost savings when compared.,Virtual Machine Management and Resource Management is very good. You can adjust many resources while the VM is running and take Advantage of reducing impact to production. For example you can grow a virtual hard drive "hot", even when its larger than 2TB. Cluster Management is very easy to set up and allows you to "live migrate resources" while in use not affecting production, minimizing downtime. This allows for many events such as maintenance tasks (software updates or firmware) or performance troubleshooting issues that need addressed. Also enables you to perform rolling upgrades on your cluster nodes to upgrade you operating systems (ex 2012R2 to 2016). Backup Strategies have the opportunity to leverage the Hypervisor vs agent based backups. This allows for you to avoid overtaxing individual VMs during backup operations. And removing agent based backups from your environment is going to lessen the software footprint that has the possibility to create contention on resources.,HyperV could use better native tools for user to look into VM performance and health. Tools do exist but need improved to be competitive. Errors and Warning could be more visible in the Management View. Things like High CPU, Network peaks and Memory should be able to pop to the front when there is an issue.,10,There was an extreme positivity to migrating our environment to HyperV. The Hardware cost savings are exponential and Microsoft Licensing can also be a cost savings depending on how you license your hosts (Enterprise vs Data Center Licenses).,Veeam Backup & Replication, Windows ServerHyper-V is powerful and well integrated with Windows, albeit not the easiest or fastest virtualization software out there.I currently use Hyper-V with two clients to virtualize a number of different functions. Specifically, I have VMs acting as domain controllers, Linux servers, and a QuickBooks server. Using Hyper-V to virtualize these machines allows for more easy management, especially if a restart is required, as that can be done remotely without worry of the machine not turning back on. In addition, the entire VM can be backed up and restored in the case of a catastrophic failure. Finally, using Hyper-V allows me to have multiple single purposes machines running on a single higher powered physical machine.,Hyper-V is deeply integrated with Windows Server, and works with the built-in Windows Server backup software, as such a 3rd party backup solution is not required. In general, Hyper-V is easy to set up. There are a number of different options to choose from, but they are laid out in a logical manner and explained fairly well within the Hyper-V interface. Hyper-V's virtual disks (.vhdx) are extremely flexible and robust. They support dynamic resizing, i.e. you can create a 1TB disk that will show up as 1TB within the VM, but on the real machine the vhdx will only be as big as the amount of data within the VM. Microsoft provides a plethora of support documents for Hyper-V usage.,Hyper-V's support for non-Windows based OS' (i.e. Linux) is only OK. You can certainly virtualize a Linux machine, but it's integration with the rest of Windows is limited, and it's performance is only OK. Adding an external hard drive (USB or otherwise) to a VM is clunky at best, as it requires the physical to be set to offline via the Disk Management snap-in before it can be added to the VM. Backing up a VM can be lesson in frustration at times. While a VM can be easily backed up using Windows Server backup - when an issue arises with the backup, it can be very difficult tracking down exactly what the issue is.,7,Being able to use one higher powered machine to then virtualize a multitude of other machines has definitely saved on hardware costs. The exact amount, however, is difficult to calculate. Initial setup of Hyper-V can be time consuming, and setting up individual VM's is more time consuming than setting up a real machine. However, once the initial setup is done, overall time costs are lowered.,Parallels Desktop, VMware Fusion, VMware Workstation and VMware ESXi,Parallels Desktop, Dropbox Business, QuickBooks Enterprise Solutions, Adobe Acrobat DC, Microsoft Office 2016, TeamViewer, Code42 (formerly CrashPlan), BackblazeHyper-V is friend to CFO and SysAdmin alikeWe use Hyper-V in production as well as for testing. Hyper-V is handy because it's available on all Windows servers and it's free. Microsoft has created a pretty competitive product in the virtualization space. Its major competitor being VMware's ESXi. Hyper-V can be managed via SCVMM or individually on each host system. It has the native Windows look and feel to it, which is a real advantage for shortening learning curves and adoption. It's easy to implement, to use, and to manage. Microsoft has taken the financial sting out of virtualization by making it part of its server product. Hyper-V, like all virtualization technologies, makes business sense because it leverages hardware resources that would otherwise go wasted. For example, a standard database server might cost $8,000, but only might be utilized in the range of 30 to 40 percent. Virtualization takes that same $8,000 server and hosts many types of systems including the database system, which saves a lot of money on hardware infrastructure.,Hyper-V is native Windows, so it's optimized for the Windows platform. Virtual machines are very well behaved in this environment, which is a great benefit for administrators. Hyper-V is very easy to implement and to use. A short learning curve is essential for maintaining a high level of productivity in a business. Even the newest of administrators can become proficient almost immediately with Hyper-V. Hyper-V is flexible in which type of hardware you can use for host systems. This is especially cost-effective in businesses where IT budgets are already stretched. Being able to use a wide range of hardware systems as hosts helps maximize hardware utilization while keeping costs down because small shops don't have to go out and spend tens of thousands of dollars on the latest and greatest hardware. You can pretty much use what you have on hand, with few exceptions.,Hyper-V doesn't support some of the more cost-effective storage systems such as GlusterFS. It's unfortunate because while Hyper-V is certainly cost-effective, good leveraged storage solutions to support it are not. I wish Hyper-V had the capability similar to VMware's DRS so that VMs could move about to balance utilization without having to use SCVMM and SCOM to get similar capabilities. SCVMM and SCOM are really too expensive and heavy for smaller shops that need DRS without the overhead.,9,Although navigating Microsoft's licensing labyrinth is unpleasant, dealing with VMware's very high cost is a bigger problem. Choosing Hyper-V has saved us a lot of money that is better spent on software and support. Because Hyper-V is readily available, easy to implement, and easy to manage, it has saved us a lot of money on training. Just about any Windows administrator can use Hyper-V. After a few sessions, a competent administrator can be an expert. Some virtualization solutions require multiple expensive classes to gain that same level of knowledge. Hyper-V's lack of cost has allowed us to build an entire test environment for free. We can test migrations, test new software, and build VMs at will all in an environment that was essentially free. We used hardware that we had on hand and we already had Windows server licenses.,VMware ESXi and Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization,Splunk Enterprise, KnowBe4, Oracle VM VirtualBox, OpenVZAll your Machines at one place.I use Hyper-V for my personal needs. I use it for the virtual environment of solving possible issues that can happen inside this virtual network. Such as DNS, IP conflict, sharing, and permissions. I had around 7 machines and one of them was a server machine. Hyper-V helps me to easily toggle between those machines and pinpoint the issue without any trouble.,Remote Connection works perfectly. It's easy to set up, control and maintain. Organizing your environment is really easy. You can label every machine and leave notes next to them so you don't get confused. Doesn't waste any necessary resources. It manages RAM and CPU usage pretty well, sleep option works like a charm.,It should be able to provide end user with a more convenient first setup of Virtual or remote Machine. It should be able to do this with machines on the local network. Some automatization is needed on the maintenance level, there is a lot of things that you have to do manually instead automatically.,8,There cannot be any negative impact, Hyper-V is a free tool that comes alongside Windows OS, be it a windows 7, 8 or 10. If you invest in coaching your staff to handle Hyper-V it could be a great return on investment.,VMware Player,VMware Player, VMware Workstation, Oracle Virtual Desktop InfrastructureA Great VMware AlternativeWe use Hyper-V as our preferred virtual machine solution. It got our organization off of physical servers and onto a modern format. The ease of conversion and use made Hyper-V the best program available to us. I never have had any problems with the software and have been very pleased with it overall.,Make changes on the go Easy to migrate to Great technical support,More in-depth options for further control of VMs Cost Clearer outline of future goals,8,It has lessened the need for physical servers It has provided us with a clearer layout of our environment It has simplified our backup environment,,JIRA Service Desk, Graylog, Nagios
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Score 8.4 out of 101
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Hyper-V
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Michael Jipping profile photo
November 30, 2018

Hyper-V Review: "HyperV The Hypervisor Solution"

Score 10 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
HyperV became the Virtualization choice to replace or migrate as many systems to a Virtual Environment. This decision spanned the entire company. The largest business problem it solved was the physical space and requirements needed to continue to use physical servers. It also addressed the increasing complexity of server management. High Density computing offers many advantage and can deliver a substantial cost savings when compared.
  • Virtual Machine Management and Resource Management is very good. You can adjust many resources while the VM is running and take Advantage of reducing impact to production. For example you can grow a virtual hard drive "hot", even when its larger than 2TB.
  • Cluster Management is very easy to set up and allows you to "live migrate resources" while in use not affecting production, minimizing downtime. This allows for many events such as maintenance tasks (software updates or firmware) or performance troubleshooting issues that need addressed.
  • Also enables you to perform rolling upgrades on your cluster nodes to upgrade you operating systems (ex 2012R2 to 2016).
  • Backup Strategies have the opportunity to leverage the Hypervisor vs agent based backups. This allows for you to avoid overtaxing individual VMs during backup operations. And removing agent based backups from your environment is going to lessen the software footprint that has the possibility to create contention on resources.
  • HyperV could use better native tools for user to look into VM performance and health. Tools do exist but need improved to be competitive.
  • Errors and Warning could be more visible in the Management View. Things like High CPU, Network peaks and Memory should be able to pop to the front when there is an issue.
HyperV is well suited for most environments. Most system engineers or business owners can take advantage of the quick learning cycle with the product. There are a lot of online resources available. It is a great functional, low cost and viable solution. Small Business or Enterprise can adopt this technology without much concern. If your Virtual Machines have a requirement to be hosted on a Linux based host then perhaps you should use a competitor software versus HyperV, but I have not seen this as an issue very frequently.
Read Michael Jipping's full review
Aaron Pinsker profile photo
November 29, 2018

"Hyper-V is powerful and well integrated with Windows, albeit not the easiest or fastest virtualization software out there."

Score 7 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
I currently use Hyper-V with two clients to virtualize a number of different functions. Specifically, I have VMs acting as domain controllers, Linux servers, and a QuickBooks server. Using Hyper-V to virtualize these machines allows for more easy management, especially if a restart is required, as that can be done remotely without worry of the machine not turning back on. In addition, the entire VM can be backed up and restored in the case of a catastrophic failure. Finally, using Hyper-V allows me to have multiple single purposes machines running on a single higher powered physical machine.
  • Hyper-V is deeply integrated with Windows Server, and works with the built-in Windows Server backup software, as such a 3rd party backup solution is not required.
  • In general, Hyper-V is easy to set up. There are a number of different options to choose from, but they are laid out in a logical manner and explained fairly well within the Hyper-V interface.
  • Hyper-V's virtual disks (.vhdx) are extremely flexible and robust. They support dynamic resizing, i.e. you can create a 1TB disk that will show up as 1TB within the VM, but on the real machine the vhdx will only be as big as the amount of data within the VM.
  • Microsoft provides a plethora of support documents for Hyper-V usage.
  • Hyper-V's support for non-Windows based OS' (i.e. Linux) is only OK. You can certainly virtualize a Linux machine, but it's integration with the rest of Windows is limited, and it's performance is only OK.
  • Adding an external hard drive (USB or otherwise) to a VM is clunky at best, as it requires the physical to be set to offline via the Disk Management snap-in before it can be added to the VM.
  • Backing up a VM can be lesson in frustration at times. While a VM can be easily backed up using Windows Server backup - when an issue arises with the backup, it can be very difficult tracking down exactly what the issue is.
Virtualizing a Windows Server via Hyper-V works really well. I especially like using it to virtualize a domain controller that requires 100% up time. While you can use Hyper-V on a regular non-server version of Windows Pro, it isn't as tightly integrated and some features aren't available (such as being able to be backed up using built-in software). Finally, I would NOT recommend using Hyper-V to virtualize a non-Windows OS machine.
Read Aaron Pinsker's full review
Kenneth Hess profile photo
August 09, 2018

Review: "Hyper-V is friend to CFO and SysAdmin alike"

Score 9 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
We use Hyper-V in production as well as for testing. Hyper-V is handy because it's available on all Windows servers and it's free. Microsoft has created a pretty competitive product in the virtualization space. Its major competitor being VMware's ESXi. Hyper-V can be managed via SCVMM or individually on each host system. It has the native Windows look and feel to it, which is a real advantage for shortening learning curves and adoption. It's easy to implement, to use, and to manage. Microsoft has taken the financial sting out of virtualization by making it part of its server product. Hyper-V, like all virtualization technologies, makes business sense because it leverages hardware resources that would otherwise go wasted. For example, a standard database server might cost $8,000, but only might be utilized in the range of 30 to 40 percent. Virtualization takes that same $8,000 server and hosts many types of systems including the database system, which saves a lot of money on hardware infrastructure.
  • Hyper-V is native Windows, so it's optimized for the Windows platform. Virtual machines are very well behaved in this environment, which is a great benefit for administrators.
  • Hyper-V is very easy to implement and to use. A short learning curve is essential for maintaining a high level of productivity in a business. Even the newest of administrators can become proficient almost immediately with Hyper-V.
  • Hyper-V is flexible in which type of hardware you can use for host systems. This is especially cost-effective in businesses where IT budgets are already stretched. Being able to use a wide range of hardware systems as hosts helps maximize hardware utilization while keeping costs down because small shops don't have to go out and spend tens of thousands of dollars on the latest and greatest hardware. You can pretty much use what you have on hand, with few exceptions.
  • Hyper-V doesn't support some of the more cost-effective storage systems such as GlusterFS. It's unfortunate because while Hyper-V is certainly cost-effective, good leveraged storage solutions to support it are not.
  • I wish Hyper-V had the capability similar to VMware's DRS so that VMs could move about to balance utilization without having to use SCVMM and SCOM to get similar capabilities. SCVMM and SCOM are really too expensive and heavy for smaller shops that need DRS without the overhead.
Hyper-V is well-suited to smaller environments and those that have budgetary constraints. It's also very good for those businesses that need an inexpensive virtualization solution but also doesn't want to go open source. There are a few limitations with using Hyper-V but careful planning and good administration can overcome most of them. If I were asked to build a large (>100 systems) mission-critical environment, I wouldn't use Hyper-V. It's good for smaller installations, but VMware is really more scalable and better suited to large environments. Some might disagree that Hyper-V falls short but for my money, VMware is the better choice in those situations. I really like Hyper-V, but you have to be ready to make some concessions for its shortcomings.
Read Kenneth Hess's full review
Stefan Trbojevic profile photo
August 16, 2018

Hyper-V Review: "All your Machines at one place."

Score 8 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
I use Hyper-V for my personal needs. I use it for the virtual environment of solving possible issues that can happen inside this virtual network. Such as DNS, IP conflict, sharing, and permissions. I had around 7 machines and one of them was a server machine. Hyper-V helps me to easily toggle between those machines and pinpoint the issue without any trouble.
  • Remote Connection works perfectly. It's easy to set up, control and maintain.
  • Organizing your environment is really easy. You can label every machine and leave notes next to them so you don't get confused.
  • Doesn't waste any necessary resources. It manages RAM and CPU usage pretty well, sleep option works like a charm.
  • It should be able to provide end user with a more convenient first setup of Virtual or remote Machine. It should be able to do this with machines on the local network.
  • Some automatization is needed on the maintenance level, there is a lot of things that you have to do manually instead automatically.
Hyper-V is well suited for some larger scale networks and projects. It shouldn't be used in any case as a Virtual player for one single virtual machine. So the downside of Hyper-V would be its lack of awareness for a single Virtual machine but better usage overall for a great number of machines.

Hyper-V is good for maintaining real networks and connecting to the servers.
Read Stefan Trbojevic's full review
No photo available
November 21, 2018

Hyper-V Review: "A Great VMware Alternative"

Score 8 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
We use Hyper-V as our preferred virtual machine solution. It got our organization off of physical servers and onto a modern format. The ease of conversion and use made Hyper-V the best program available to us. I never have had any problems with the software and have been very pleased with it overall.
  • Make changes on the go
  • Easy to migrate to
  • Great technical support
  • More in-depth options for further control of VMs
  • Cost
  • Clearer outline of future goals
It is a great application if you are looking for an alternative to VMware. I honestly do prefer VMware but Hyper-V does a good job of getting the job done.
Read this authenticated review
Jeffrey Rudacille profile photo
March 15, 2018

Review: "Hyper-V is the place to be for Virtualization if you are an SMB"

Score 10 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
Hyper-V has been our hypervisor of choice because of its fairly seamless integration with the rest of the Windows stack and its great price. We used it to consolidate our server farm into just a handful of actual physical servers. It is being used by our whole organization in that almost every piece of server infrastructure, except the hosts themselves, is hosted on a hyper-v server. Some are in clusters and some are standalone. It solves the need for additional hardware expense, space needed to house the servers and saves money when it comes to power consumption. In conjunction with Windows clustering, it also gives us an in-house live backup in that the virtual servers can run on any of our clustered hosts.
  • Hyper-V is both fairly easy to learn while being robust in its capability of taking one physical server and turning it into multiple functioning systems for user consumption.
  • One of the gigantic strengths of Hyper-V is the fact that it is included with Windows Server.
  • When used in conjunction with Windows Clustering, Hyper-V goes from just being a virtualization product to also being a Disaster Recovery product. Setting up multiple hosts in a cluster, if all of them have the capability of hosting all machines at once, allows one to know that if one host goes off line the other hosts will pick up the slack and keep the virtual instances running.
  • Since Hyper-V is free and a MS product there is copious free support for it on the web. Most issues and questions can be dealt with just by doing some searching.
  • Hyper-V's snapshot feature can sometimes be a little clunky and cause issues removing the snapshots. Most problems are easily rectified but it is a weak point of the software.
  • Host Servers that have Hyper-V installed on them, if there are a lot of servers, becoming fairly useless when it comes to being used for other functions...both in a literal sense and licensing sense.
  • Despite the product being free with MS server, the new licensing scheme MS has available makes it more costly to host Hyper-V instances when one wants more than two per physical host.
Hyper-V is well suited for shops that are not completely sold into using VMWare for its virtualization needs. There is some limitation on using some hardware with Hyper-V but when it comes to every day server user, the Hyper-V technology is so mature that almost any in house scenario can benefit from its use. Whether it is for space, power or DR reasons.

The only time I can think it would be less appropriate is the case where someone wants a server to have full, un limited access to a hardware based disc system and does not want any competition for the use of the system.
Read Jeffrey Rudacille's full review
No photo available
June 05, 2018

Hyper-V Review: "Enterprise Level Virtualization"

Score 10 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
We use Hyper-V (Windows Server 2016) to host our internal virtual server infrastructure. At the moment we use 4 Servers in a cluster to serve all our internal workloads. In addition, we consult our partners and customers in planning and implementation for Hyper-V as the virtualization platform. With Windows Server 2016 especially in combination with hyper-converged infrastructure with Storage Spaces Direct.
  • fast and easy deployment
  • clustering with live migration
  • direct integration in the OS
  • manageability (Windows Admin Center will solve this in future releases)
  • monitoring of virtual machines performance
Well suited:
  • Virtualization of internal infrastructure
  • Virtualizing Windows OS
  • SQL Server hosting

Less appropriate:
  • Hosting Linux web server farms
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No photo available
April 30, 2018

Review: "Hyper-V - Microsoft's virtualization product"

Score 8 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
Hyper-V is being used at remote locations to run multiple server instances on one physical box. This is being used across the organization at all remote locations. The business problem it addresses is providing a FREE (without system center) way to virtualize your environment.
  • FREE way to run multiple servers on one box
  • Easy to use - Just copy/paste a virtual machine to the box, and get to configuring
  • Integrates with other Microsoft products such as Active Directory
  • Like most other Microsoft products - having to find support can sometimes be challenging
  • Wish there were more ways to interface with the host - i.e. using Hyper-V to see the computer as it boots up
  • Backups are sometimes a challenge - either the virtual machine works....or it doesn't
If your in-house talent is very good with Microsoft products, and comfortable with dealing with problems that come up themselves, and have a tight budget - Microsoft Hyper-V works well. If your company would prefer to have a more reliable support contact - then VMWare may be a better option.
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No photo available
April 26, 2018

Hyper-V Review: "HyperV Pro and Cons"

Score 7 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
Hyper-V is used for a part of our development environment. It is built into Microsoft Server and easy to use. Also used in a branch office. It gives us the ease of use with both installation/configuration and managing the VMs including taking backups.
  • Create VMs, move VMs around all with PowerShell.
  • Creating snapshots is very easy, especially for our developers.
  • Hyper-V is in itself a free product, which makes it also a good product to use it in studying from home to extend my own knowledge and experience
  • The license costs can go fast when using it in a failover environment.
  • The virtual switch build into the product could have a better GUI for configuration
  • I would a direct build in backup function
Hyper-V is easy to use as a solution for a DTAP environment. For a small business, it is also suited well to run multiple VMs on just one server. In that case, it can function as an infrastructure solution. It is less suited to work in an environment with different hypervisors; it is not easy to migrate from VMWare to Hyper-V and vice versa.
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April 09, 2018

Hyper-V Review: "Hyper V working well!"

Score 8 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
We use it to present multiple OSs on a single desktop, or on the network which is accessible to the entire company and employees. This is extremely useful to be able to use all platforms and all pieces of software we might need in order to customize scripts and coding the way we need to.
  • Running old software versions
  • Multiple operating systems
  • Testing and troubleshooting software apps
  • Virtual networking
  • The digital virtualization platform could certainly use some work
  • Bulk licensing
  • Discounts
Since Hypervisor technology is software on which multiple virtual machines can run, we use this very effectively for resource allocation to our virtual machines and our virtual desktop infrastructure platform, which is run on Nutanix, with Hyper V performing the sizing and allocation of compute, storage, and manual laborers that are needed.
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Peter Anderson BEng MCSA profile photo
September 18, 2017

Review: "Hyper-V, it doesn't give software testers time to go get a brew while things roll back"

Score 10 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
We use Hyper-V for production servers and virtualising test environments across the organisation.

Testing
For testing it allows us to quickly roll back a machine to a 'clean' environment, enabling us to guarantee testing from a known point. This is something that is done very regularly in our business as we are a software development house and need that guarantee that the test environment is not spoiled by a previous build of our software, or an operating system update.

Servers
Almost all of our servers are now virtualised, this helps us manage our physical environment by reducing the hardware requirements. It also allows virtualised machines to be ported with ease if a problem arises on the host server.
  • Checkpoints - used on a daily basis many times, we would be lost without this functionality.
  • Flexibility - Hyper-V manages its hardware demands seamlessly distributing memory across the guest machines without compromising the guests or the host.
  • Ease of administration - Tied into the Windows OS (Server and 10 now) it is very easy to get a virtual environment running.
  • Hyper-V Manager - our main Hyper-v server (for test VMs) has many virtual machines on it, and we find managing more than a handful of machines in the Hyper-V manager can become a little cumbersome.
Hyper-V works really well when you have a machine that you want to roll back on a regular basis, for purposes such as testing software. In some situations, such as hosting graphics-intensive applications, Hyper-V (while having RemoteFX available in some environments) can be an unnecessary piece of the puzzle where a 'real' machine would be more appropriate.
Read Peter Anderson BEng MCSA's full review
Chris Gigliotti profile photo
October 10, 2017

"Hyperactive Hyper-V Hyper-Review"

Score 9 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
We use Hyper-V across the entire organization. Everything that requires a server is virtualized, and Hyper-V makes it easy to configure a fault-tolerant cluster for a very low price. With replication, we also don’t worry as much about downtime or data loss.
  • Easy to configure.
  • Free with every copy of Windows Server
  • Dynamically adjustable memory on the VMs
  • Clustering can be tricky to configure
  • Replication sometimes fails and needs to be reconfigured.
  • Easy to lose track of VMs created.
  • Built-in backup tools inadequate.
Great for small to medium-sized offices with modest needs. Once you get to large businesses, managing and configuring your VMs requires dedicated staff.
Read Chris Gigliotti's full review
Reginald Johnson profile photo
September 22, 2017

User Review: "Hyper-V... fast and easy"

Score 9 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
Our customers use Hyper-V for scenarios where the cost associated with VMWare solutions is simply not advantageous. It is a simple to use hypervisor packed with enterprise functionality.
  • Easy to use
  • Easy to deploy
  • Cloud consistent
  • Fully integrated with Microsoft management tooling
  • Overall memory management is still not as advanced as VMware ESX.
  • The virtual thread model used by the hypervisor has improved but does not maximize the true power of the host CPU.
  • The model for over-contention of CPU allows for significant overutilization leading to bad performance.
Hyper-V is incredibly well suited for proof of concepts, mixed hardware clusters, and low-cost server consolidation. It is not well suited for scenarios requiring high-speed memory access.
Read Reginald Johnson's full review
Eddie Brady profile photo
September 18, 2017

"Hyper-V Review"

Score 10 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
We use Hyper-V to support our private cloud for development and consulting purposes. Using Hyper-V provides us tremendous flexibility. We're able to run many VMs on a single host and use it to replicate many different environments for testing.
  • I like the snapshot feature where you can take a snapshot of the VM and later apply that snapshot if you want to roll back your changes.
  • The dynamic memory is a very nice feature. This allows the host computer to allocate memory to a VM as it is needed.
  • It is nice being able to use PowerShell to manage the hyper-v service and the VM management process.
  • There is nothing that I'd like to see done differently. It is simply a great product.
Hyper-V is well suited for development. One is able to stand up VMs to replicate an environment using a single host computer. You can then shut the VMs down, back them up, snapshot them, and roll them back to a previous snapshot. The entire process can be automated using PowerShell as well.
Read Eddie Brady's full review
Marc-Olivier Turgeon-Ferland profile photo
July 24, 2017

User Review: "Why Hyper-V might be for you"

Score 6 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
We use Hyper-V for development VMs as well as for production VMs. I run, manage and help developers use our 600+ development VMs including all the underlying infrastructure.
  • Use of scripting to create and automate VM creation and management. Powershell is one of the best scripting languages there is and Hyper-V like all Microsoft products supports it out of the box.
  • Integration via Virtual Machine Manager. The real power of Hyper-V is when you pair it with VMM. You then get easy templating and a lot of other more advanced features.
  • Since Windows Server 2016, Hyper-V clusters support automatic load balancing between nodes.
  • Hyper-V clusters are really not reliable enough if you need 24/7 operation. We encountered a lot of hardware failure which resulted in the cluster restarting all the nodes (even the nodes which were OK) which is kind of the opposite goal of clusters.
  • Poor support for less popular Linux OS like Arch Linux.
  • Practically no features when used without Virtual Machine Manager. No templates, no user management, no balancing (Except on Windows Server 2016), etc.
If you need a cheap hypervisor for development purposes or production which does not require 24/7 operation and are running mostly Windows VMs, Hyper-V is hard to beat but if you need reliability and performance, Hyper-V is not the right choice for you.
Read Marc-Olivier Turgeon-Ferland's full review
Kostyantyn Khomko profile photo
July 21, 2017

Hyper-V Review: "Native virtualization which saves your time and money"

Score 8 out of 10
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I have been using Hyper-V for about half a year for creating clusters on Linux (RedHat, Ubuntu).
  • Very satisfied with the results: simplicity, reliability and its speed of work.
  • But found several cons: absence of drag-and-drop, clipboard also does not work, therefore there is no possibility to copy-paste files from my PC to Hyper-V. Can do this only via RDP but it takes some work: install XRDP, open ports. So, per my point of view it needs refinement to make such things easier.
Well suited for managing Windows Servers and also for Linux. Less appropriate for FreeBSD and MacOS.
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November 21, 2017

User Review: "Hyper-V, the best"

Score 9 out of 10
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Hyper-V is used across our whole organization as well as across the organizations of our main big customers. It is obviously used for virtualizing the servers. It makes sure we can easily set up redundancy and fail-over. tI also enables us to easily backup and restore in case of DR, even to different hardware.
  • using single jbods attached to several physical servers
  • fail-over
  • legacy OS
  • snapshots
  • attach USB devices
Any organization big enough to use AD should install it on top of Hyper-V in my opinion to streamline Disaster Recovery scenarios. Also when several server roles are needed it should be used to install then across different (virtual) instances. It is also great for test environments as you can install, or even re-image pre-installed, OSs
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August 03, 2017

User Review: "Hyper-V--Not quite there yet."

Score 7 out of 10
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Hyper-v was used to host all Windows infrastructure (700+ servers) in the company. We migrated from VMware, which saved the company over 100K in licensing.
  • Built into Windows, and free!
  • It's getting better at having the same functionality as VMware.
  • Microsoft support is very active with assistance.
  • Continuing to integrate with Azure for hybrid deployments.
  • Installation, particularly networking, is difficult.
  • Need to improve upon cluster stability.
  • Several components are needed to manage from hardware to Hyper-V. Needs a single pane of glass.
It will work fine in smaller deployments (200 or less VMs), and all Microsoft shops.
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Keith Luken profile photo
May 02, 2017

Review: "Hyper-V is not ready for prime time, but has merits in SMB or small workload scenarios"

Score 3 out of 10
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We began to make an entire conversion to Hyper-V over the last 2 years for our new DC and also our remote locations. The problem it was supposed to solve was the increasing cost of VMware.
  • Lower cost if you are a MS Windows shop. You have to license Windows anyway so if you have a data-center license you get the rights to use unlimited Hyper-V on that host.
  • Third party support is lacking. It is easy to get third party tools and support for VMware, but not so with Hyper-V.
  • Uses too many resources. Unless you run 2016 nano it is still to bloaty and consumes too much of the available host resources. Typically 4-8GB compared to less than 1GB for VMware.
  • Requires third party plugins to get good monitoring of resources.
  • VMM is the equivalent to vCenter and it pales in comparison. It is for more complex to use and is extremely bloated and slow. Nothing is intuitive and the complexity means you are more likely going to make mistakes or have issues.
  • Backing up VMs is difficult unless you have a fully supported guest and properly running integration services. Hyper-V does not support crash consistent snaps like VMware does and will often pause the running VM it it can not get a clean snap. This is clearly unacceptable in a mission critical environment.
Hyper-V is best used in an SMB or remote office scenario where you have a standalone server. Clustering Hyper-V is not as intuitive as VMware and thus a single server install is far easier to set up and support. If you run a lean staff Hyper-V may not be for you because finding people that are decent with Hyper-V is difficult. The future is more cloud oriented and thus people will be focused on that vs. Hyper-V.
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Daniel Hereford profile photo
March 27, 2017

User Review: "Hyper-V Great for DR"

Score 8 out of 10
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Hyper-V is being used as our hypervisor platform to support our disaster recovery/secondary data center operation. VMware runs our other data center. Hyper-V was implemented in DR to save licensing costs over VMware and also as a way for the bank to assess its capabilities in a slightly less critical operation. It has been a very successful project.
  • Included in Windows Server licensing with Enterprise Agreements. Leveraging value from the EA and saving money over main competitors like VMware is a key business strength of the solution.
  • Hyper-V is relatively easy to manage if you have experienced Windows engineers on staff.
  • I have found the solution to be very reliable (not your typical reboot every couple weeks kind of solution).
  • Monitoring the performance and uptime of the solution is still best achieved with third party tools.
  • Hypervisor replication like Zerto or VMware Site Recovery Manager are still superior products for high availability.
  • Great for branch office deployments even if your DC is VMware or other.
  • Great for leveraging a server purchase since Hyper-V is included.
  • Larger more complex infrastructures are still overwhelmingly supported on VMware from a market share perspective.
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March 30, 2017

Review: "Hyper-V at Small Healthcare Organization"

Score 7 out of 10
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We use Hyper-V at an enterprise level to create and maintain all of our virtual machines. Currently, most of this resides on an IBM Blade Center with four blades and about 12 VMs.
  • Since Hyper-V is a Microsoft application it integrates seamlessly with the OS and other related tools.
  • Setup and Maintenance of VMs is straightforward.
  • As an established product, Hyper-V is supported by most other systems (e.g. Disaster Recovery).
  • We use Hyper-V in a Windows Server 2012 environment. As with many other features of this Server OS, certain aspects are less than intuitive.
  • I don't have experience directly with other products such as VMware. But I have the impression, from peers in other organizations, that Hyper-V is somewhat less powerful and feature-rich.
Hyper-V is an obvious option for organizations that employ Windows OS on servers. It makes sense for companies that have a relatively small number of virtual machines. Obviously, it would not be a logical consideration for Linux or mixed OS environments. Nor would it be the best selection for companies that intend to utilize a larger number of VMs.
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Bill Starling profile photo
April 13, 2016

"Hyper-V Review by a Database Administrator/Developer"

Score 9 out of 10
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Hyper-V is used across R&D, IT, and support. Each department has their own Hyper-V server but can use VMs from another department's server if need be. We create Virtual Machines in Hyper-V for testing and quality control purposes and to recreate issues from clients in order to track down the proper fix for that issue. The business problem it addresses is having to recreate so many different environments for testing, quality assurance and support. We can test upgrades, patches, configuration setting, etc., with little overhead costs.
  • Make creation of VMs simple with a wizard that will walk you through each step. A brand new user to Hyper-V should be able to open Hyper-V and create a VM in a matter of minutes. Creating and using the VM are different but creating the actual VM is simple.
  • Taking snapshots of VMs is simple. Just choose the VM and choose to create a snapshot. The snapshots are easy to manage and are shown in a graphical 'tree' to show how they are related and what the order of their creation is.
  • Changing VM setting and configurations are simple within Hyper-V settings. You can change everything from the amount of RAM to the size of the hard drive along with how many processors a VM is allocated from the Hyper-V host. You can also add network 'cards' and drives to mimic different RAID and networking setups.
  • Migrating files from one Hyper-V host to another can be tricky if the VM has snapshots. In testing environments most VMs will have snapshots and it can be a headache to move a VM from one host to another.
  • Export/Import process is a bit clunky. There are various options when exporting and Hyper-V doesn't do the best job describing them for new users. Once you have done this a few times it is easier but the first few times may be more difficult.
  • Cloning VMs causes issues. This is more of an issue with Windows and the system ID that Windows has but cloning a VM is not as easy as just copying the files and pasting them in another folder. The VM setting will clone just fine but the VM hard drive (VHD or VHDX) could cause issues.
Hyper-V is great for having low overhead as far as physical systems go. You can spin up or get rid of VMs as needed for various IT needs. Testing environments that can be spun up quickly at various application levels is great to reduce the time to get testing going or to be able to respond to client issues in a timely manner. It is less appropriate for a company who does data processing and needs people at desktops to just process applications or some form of data.
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Alan Matson, CCNA:S, MCP profile photo
June 06, 2016

Review: "The not so Hyper virtualization platform Hyper-V"

Score 7 out of 10
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We used Hyper-V to support virtual applications and additional virtual machines for production and development. The ability to spin up a virtual environment which could be backed up and re-stored quickly was critical for our infrastructure for development of new support for our client base. We tested several virtual environments during the time phase and Hyper-V was one of them.
  • Quick and easy deployment
  • Managing the environment was easy for anyone with Windows experience.
  • Well documented on the internet for self help.
  • Very resource intensive.
  • A learning curve coming from ESXi.
  • Some limitations such as promiscuous mode on a NIC.
Hyper-V is well suited for quick turn and burn VMs. One of the products we had a hard time with and could not virtualize with Hyper-V was the Websense Network Agent software which required promiscuous mode on the NIC to sniff all traffic from the physical and virtual networks.
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Igor Dobrogorskiy profile photo
April 13, 2016

User Review: "Hyper-V for growing company."

Score 8 out of 10
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We use Hyper-V as for production as for our internal needs. We have several Hyper-V clusters for different departments in our organization - Dev, QA, Ops and IT. First three use Hyper-V for development, testing and deployment. IT uses Hyper-V for internal projects. We also provide solutions hosted on Hyper-V for our customers. Hyper-V helps us to keep our clustered environments reliable, scalable and highly effective.
  • Hyper-V is available. It won't take you much time to create your own virtualized environment.
  • It's easily scalable. Not a big deal to add more nodes to cluster.
  • It's reliable. High Availability goes out-of-the-box.
  • Not informative. It's hard to find how much of sources used.
  • Logs not so great. It's hard to troubleshoot issues.
  • Hard to operate with templates.
  • It's a challenge to deploy big amount of VMs at one time.
It's much better to use Hyper-V in the big clustered environment, were you do not need to deploy or remove big amounts of VMs everyday. It's also good to use it for personal use on a workstation.
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Shane Trapp profile photo
March 29, 2016

Hyper-V: "HyperV Review"

Score 5 out of 10
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Hyper-V is used for very specific workloads within our organization, generally dev and test only. It helps solve the need to virtualize workloads within our environment.
  • Hyper-V is easy to manage and has a fairly quick learning curve for people who are used to other hypervisor management software.
  • Hyper-V's high availability options are on par with any other hypervisor solutions available, however they do tend to be a little more difficult to configure.
  • Storage management is easy to do and the high availability works well.
  • We have seen hiccups when losing connectivity to either storage or a network that require manual intervention.
  • Would love to see a more striped down version of windows that the Hyper-V hosts get installed on.
Hyper-V is a decent product I am just not sure that it is up to the same standard as some of its competitors.
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Feature Scorecard Summary

Virtual machine automated provisioning (26)
7.7
Management console (30)
7.7
Live virtual machine backup (26)
8.4
Live virtual machine migration (29)
8.7
Hypervisor-level security (27)
8.3

About Hyper-V

Categories:  Server Virtualization

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