Movable Type Reviews

16 Ratings
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Score 8.1 out of 101

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Sophia Ahn profile photo
Score 7 out of 10
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Pros and Cons

  • Easy to use straight out of the box, very user friendly with an intuitive interface.
  • Great for team use where there are multiple editors and writers fixing and editing each other's works. It's easy to track who last made the latest edits.
  • Stellar support team and system. I've found that Moveable Type's support system is generally more responsive and helpful than WordPress.
  • Very difficult to tamper with back-end coding, which is why we had a separate CMS for our bigger articles and interactive content.
  • Limited number of plug-ins compared to other popular CMS like WordPress or Drupal.
  • Not as media friendly as I would like. Movable Type was VERY finicky with embedding video and images. Constantly had to resize images and mess with video size to make sure it would display at the right size on the website.
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Dennis Dewey profile photo
Score 7 out of 10
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Pros and Cons

  • Renders one or more static pages per node/content item. Static pages are better for high traffic sites because dynamic sites do not always properly implement caching and are more likely to fail from needing a constant database connection.
  • Out of the box, the custom fields in Movable Type are much more intuitive to work with than Wordpress and other blogging platforms. The custom fields even work better than some dedicated content management systems such as Joomla. Custom fields can be defined for several different entity types such as content and taxonomy. The fields show up in the new content form and are easy to find and use.
  • The templating language in Movable Type is extremely rich and has many nice features built in. There is less of a need to extend for further templating functionality and you can also add some of your own PHP to the mix to add more features.
  • The installation of Movable Type still needs improvement. I've had to learn quite a bit about setting up my own apache servers in the past, but most of the needed modules for Movable Type come preinstalled nowadays with many server stacks.
  • The customization of the backend is much more complicated in comparison to Wordpress or other content management systems. It is difficult to rebrand the backend interface without hacking core files.
  • The licensing of Movable Type is confusing, keeps changing and now you're unable to get an open source version of MT6.x.
  • Movable Type could use its own command line utility like Drush for Drupal.
Read Dennis Dewey's full review
Jean Louis profile photo
Score 6 out of 10
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Pros and Cons

  • User-friendly interface which makes it very easy to navigate.
  • It allows you to easily create multiple blogs in one installation.
  • I like the long list of plugins that are available to use.
  • Better gallery plugin
  • Publishing
  • Template tools
Read Jean Louis's full review
Kurtis Amundson profile photo
Score 8 out of 10
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Pros and Cons

  • Movable type seamlessly integrates multiple websites in one installation which allows easy access to the content and design.
  • Template tags and coding is well documented by Movable Type to provide developers like me the tools required to make completely custom designs.
  • The more recent versions of Movable Type have really upped the ante on how broadly the platform can be used (such as for blogs, forums, e-commerce, etc.)
  • Especially on the older versions, the limited number of well-developed third-party plugins is problematic for efficiently developing a well-functioning website.
  • Versions of movable type which didn't allow pages to be constructed were difficult to create continuity in design and easily editable pages for our editors.
  • The installation process could be simplified to make it easier for those new to a CMS to install.
Read Kurtis Amundson's full review
Michelle Belmont profile photo
Score 3 out of 10
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Pros and Cons

  • Once you understood how the MT language and framework worked, customization wasn't too difficult.
  • Allowed for levels of user access.
  • Ease of creating RSS feeds.
  • Very clunky and out dated product compared to WordPress or Blogger.
  • Not user friendly. Required a lot of training.
  • Difficult for users to layout their blog entries as expected.
  • Difficult to upload images in a consistent format.
  • Features that never worked consistently: password protection.
  • Blog frequently went down.
Read Michelle Belmont's full review
Joffroi Holcombe profile photo
Score 6 out of 10
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Pros and Cons

  • Very easy to theme.
  • The control panel is simple enough for the basic user to figure out
  • Very easy to add plugins and more complex code.
  • The actual plugin website seems out of date and not well maintained.
  • The system seemed to crash for much larger sites (800+ entries).
Read Joffroi Holcombe's full review
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April 22, 2014

GTD: Gets Things Done

Score 7 out of 10
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Pros and Cons

  • It provided easy management of blog postings. I was able to set up content early and schedule my posts for a later date.
  • The interface was user friendly so you don't need to spend a lot of time in training. I was able to figure out a lot of the product on my own.
  • You could assign different administrative privileges to certain people. This means that certain people could only post to certain modules.
  • While it's beneficial to be able to assign administrative rights to a user so they can only post to certain places of a website, I can recall that Movable Type did not inform general users of the types of privileges they had. So, for example, when I knew I needed to make a posting to a certain area, and was unable to do so, I was not informed that I did not have access to make that posting. It would have been helpful for Movable Type to post a message on the screen, saying that I needed more permissions. This was very frustrating, especially when I was on deadline for a newspaper story.
  • Unfortunately, (or fortunately), I do not recall other negative experiences. I thought it was a pretty clean, friendly interface.
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Score 8 out of 10
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Pros and Cons

  • I like that there is a quick post option-- in the event that I ever need to post a blog quickly, I can do so.
  • There is an autosave function! One time, I mistakenly worked on a draft and did not save it but the server (thankfully) auto-saved my work and placed it in my draft box for me to return to later.
  • The preview tool truly comes in handy with assessing formatting issues, spelling errors and other proofreading necessities.
  • I would love to see more streamlined features for my writing-- like a smoother toolbar for bolding, underlining and italicizing things.
  • The work screen can often be very bland, I would enjoy seeing different ways of customizing my screen.
  • I would appreciate having a sidebar that shows me quick options (how to insert images, how to reformat lines, etc.) because it would make my writing process go a bit faster.
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Feature Scorecard Summary

Role-based user permissions (1)
5
API (1)
6
WYSIWYG editor (1)
9
Code quality / cleanliness (1)
6
Admin section (1)
8
Page templates (1)
5
Library of website themes (1)
3
Mobile optimization / responsive design (1)
8
Publishing workflow (1)
9
Form generator (1)
3
Content taxonomy (1)
9
SEO support (1)
6
Bulk management (1)
3
Availability / breadth of extensions (1)
3
Community / comment management (1)
7

About Movable Type

Movable Type is a Perl-based CMS from Six Apart, featuring the capability to host multiple weblogs and standalone content pages, manage files and user roles, templates, tags, categories and trackback links. Six Apart was formed in 2001 as a blog solution provider in the US. In 2003 the company founded Six Apart KK, a Japanese legal entity. In November 2010, Six Apart joined forces with VideoEgg to create a new company called SAY Media. In January 2011, Six Apart KK was wholly acquired by Infocom, a Japanese IT company listed on the Tokyo Stock Exchange. Six Apart KK has assumed responsibility over all intellectual property and business operations of Movable Type, as well as trademark rights of Six Apart. The new Six Apart, a Japanese corporation formerly known as Six Apart KK, currently develops, markets and supports Movable Type for a global user base.

Movable Type touts a template markup system near in complexity to HTML. It is designed to support unlimited users and expanding without degrading site experience or increasing page load times. Custom fields, themes, plugins and the data API support great configurability. Its decoupled architecture supports flexible deployment for multichannel delivery. It is proprietary software.
Categories:  Blogging,  Content Management

Movable Type Technical Details

Operating Systems: Unspecified
Mobile Application:No