Jenkins Reviews

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Score 8.3 out of 101

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Reviews (1-25 of 51)

Dodd Weisenberger profile photo
Score 8 out of 10
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Jenkins helps the flow of build from the development team to the QA team. Can be really helpful in doing continuous builds, but when this feature is turned on the development team must have great communication otherwise the risk of broken builds become very high. In the long run, we found it made things easier when we just pushed the build manually and appointed a team member the build master.
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Richard Rout profile photo
Score 2 out of 10
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If you have a very complex set-up and want full control of your build and test servers, then Jenkins will work for you. It's free and allows you to deploy it on your own machines and set up everything exactly how you want it. You need to invest a lot of time and work. It's not good if you just want a simple build and any other cloud service will do it for you, cheap or free.
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Erlon Sousa Pinheiro profile photo
Score 7 out of 10
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Jenkins has been serving us efficiently for a long time. It is quite reliable. Whether supporting developers work, DevOps work or staging/production deployment processing, Jenkins is a good choice. However, I believe there are some things that could be improved. When we need to execute parametrized builds, Jenkins could be more flexible in delivering us better screens (maybe something customizable) where we would insert variables to be used during the pipeline.
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trang nguyen profile photo
Score 9 out of 10
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Jenkins is well suited when you need a CICD server to handle your compilation, building and deployment process, as Jenkins has many plugins and supports most script languages so it could handle almost any kind of project. In my department, before we start on a project, we define a clear strategy to use Jenkins, which task needs to be automated with Jenkins, which branch, and which module needs to be built with Jenkins and when we need to push a new version to Artifact and deploy to the server.
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October 17, 2019

Jenkins CI/CD

Score 8 out of 10
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Jenkins is well suited for large and/or distributed teams where synchronization of production releases is critical. Jenkins allows us to reduce risk of a bad release by gatekeeping deployment with a variety of useful checks and verifications. Jenkins also has a huge amount of community support, as well as a large variety of plugins and integrations. Integrations with GitHub and Slack are extremely useful for our team.
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Score 9 out of 10
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  • It is an open-source tool with great community support.
  • It has 1000+ plugins to ease your work. If a plugin does not exist, you can code it and share it with the community.
  • It is built with Java and hence, it is portable to all the major platforms.
  • Makes developers life easy.
  • Automate the build pipeline process.
  • Used for scheduling tasks and CRON jobs.
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October 16, 2019

Excellent CI/CD tool

Score 10 out of 10
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Jenkins is the best CI/CD tool, it integrates with most other tools. it has lots of support for various plugins. Jenkins with DSLs and Jenkinsfile it can be extremely configurable. We can automate the whole build from a Git push to prod deployments.

For microservices we have a bit better tools then Jenkins.
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Dylan Cauwels profile photo
Score 9 out of 10
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Well suited for any environment that needs to be as automated as possible and is built around the DevOps philosophy. Also, perfect on any cloud infrastructure system as it allows for considerable customization for any type of setup. It allows for applications to be developed in a fast, reliable manner by cutting out the tedious process of integration or basic QA testing. I legitimately cannot think of a scenario where Jenkins would not be useful in improving your software workflow.
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Hung Vu profile photo
Score 9 out of 10
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Jenkins works well for centralizing CICD server in almost any scenario, from simple to complex systems, but you will need a dedicated server for it.
Jenkins is simple to learn so you could start without experience and it is free
If your organization already uses Gitlab, GitHub or Bitbucket you could use their CICD pipelined instead of Jenkins.
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Gabriel Samaroo profile photo
Score 10 out of 10
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Jenkins is a great tool for teams looking to build automation and continuous integration into their development workflow. It is very easy to setup and works of all the major Operating Systems. Anyone can learn to use Jenkins because the software is quite intuitive. There is also a huge community surrounding Jenkins, which makes learning resources very easy to find.
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No photo available
Score 8 out of 10
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Jenkins is open source, thus has a large number of plugins rolled out already. All major VCS, SCM, Git, and Maven applications support Jenkins. They even support Docker which is trending in DevOps nowadays. It has more than 50 APIs and plugins to work on. Thus, it is always appropriate to have Jenkins when you have a distributed workforce and to sync with everyone. To avoid synchronization problems in the distributed workforce and development, we use Jenkins. Code pushed to VCS can be built over another system so as to deploy in the production/release.
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Score 8 out of 10
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Suited for integration with GitHub, pulling on your master branch, wrapping it up into a deployment package, pushing that package out to an endpoint, and using scripting to update files. This process is primarily what we use Jenkins for, and it does this work well.
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Ramendra Sahu profile photo
Score 7 out of 10
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It supports a rich set of plugins. The job configuration history plugin, for example, allows you to see history of past builds. Features are constantly getting enhanced with each release. Great active community support, which can help you if you are trying to do something new. Better than a lot of peers available in market. GitHub integration and pull request and support for automatic code review are truly great features.
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Sagiv Frankel profile photo
Score 8 out of 10
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If you haven't used Jenkins before and have a relatively simple and straightforward deployment setup I would not use my resources on Jenkins and go for a simpler, more SaaS-based solution. If you expect to have a lot of security demands and need control of your CI/CD pipeline I would use Jenkins for the get-go.
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Score 10 out of 10
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Jenkins is a good tool to automate anything and everything. It has plugins to integrate with any other systems.
Earlier Jenkins was more like a CI tool. But now it has evolved to cater for continuous delivery and deployment as well.

Jenkins can be used to download code from a source code versioning system, build code, run tests, upload to artifact repositories and finally deploy to the required environments via shell scripts, Chef, Ansible etc.

Apart from this, Jenkins can be used to run any kind of automation required, for example, operations scheduled activities like cleaning up disk space, rotating logs etc.
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July 05, 2018

Jenkins at a glance

Score 8 out of 10
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Jenkins is well suited for a continuous integration and continuous deployment process. Jenkins file creates deployment automated as a code through docker.
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Kevin Van Heusen profile photo
Score 8 out of 10
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Jenkins is very well suited for someone in need of a Continuous Integration and Continuous Delivery solution. It does well for people with Unix/Mac based projects, it does handle Microsoft builds fine as well, however the setup of it and configuration may feel a bit more complicated for those coming from a Microsoft background.
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Neale Foulds profile photo
April 02, 2018

Jenkins CI/CD

Score 10 out of 10
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Likelihood to Recommend

It is well suited to build, continuous integration and continuous deployment. A less common use case, the tool is also good for scheduling, offline tasks, environment maintenance such as log rotation etc.
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Jonathan Yu profile photo
Score 8 out of 10
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Jenkins works pretty well for what it does, is easy to use, and aggregates logs as you would expect. For simple builds (especially Java builds), Jenkins works fairly well. It can run on full systems or headless systems, so tests requiring a graphical interface (such as those driven by Selenium and the WebDriver API) have no issues running. It can be used to manage systems to some extent (installing and managing software across a cluster by SSHing into slave machines) but its ecosystem is not geared for that; for a general automation solution, look to Ansible instead.
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Aiman Najjar profile photo
January 19, 2018

Unparalleled Flexibility

Score 8 out of 10
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Even though Jenkins was designed primarily for CI/CD, I wouldn't say that CI/CD is its greatest strengths at this time and age. Many modern CI/CD tools have emerged recently which specifically target CI/CD problems in lean, code-driven and containerized approach.

Ironically, that makes Jenkins ahead of those CI/CD-focused tools in solving non-traditional problems. I would still think of Jenkins as first choice for following use cases:
  • Automating Standard Operating Procedures - e.g. when you want to give your T1 support team a UI with single-click button to perform a routine SOP.
  • Scheduled test and validations that are not tied to releases - e.g. I've used Jenkins to automate data consistency tests across two layers of data stores and generate a nice HTML report of detected discrepancies, and also notify when any are found!
  • Workloads that require generating custom reports
  • Any other custom operations automation

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Deva Veluchamy profile photo
Score 8 out of 10
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Jenkins suite is well where we need to implement continuous integration and continuous deployment is needed. In test automation, it is possible to trigger executions automatically whenever we have new build generated or automation script changes committed. This is helpful to get quicker feedback about product quality. As plugins are available for leading test automation tools, it is also possible to easily integrate.
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Rene Enriquez profile photo
November 14, 2017

Go for jenkins

Score 10 out of 10
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Likelihood to Recommend

Jenkins is good when:
- You want to automate your build pipelines
- Implementing continuous delivery process
- Automate manual tasks

Jenkins is not good when:
- You have your code in GitHub, I will rather use travis instead which is already included and well integrated
- You want to see in a graphic representation of your pipeline, in this cases another tools like GoCD would be a fit
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Score 9 out of 10
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Jenkins is wonderful for technically proficient users to setup continuous integration quickly. In addition, if you have processes that are currently only available via command-line utilities - you can setup Jenkins jobs to run these and this now makes those jobs accessible for users who cannot or will not use command-line. In addition, the easy to use interface allows more than the tech team to utilize jobs after they are set up allowing you to spread the workload for manually triggered jobs.
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About Jenkins

Jenkins is an open source continuous integration tool.
Categories:  Build Automation

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