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Moodle is an open source Learning Management System used by educational institutions. The product is administered by the Moodle Project which is led by Moodle HQ in Australia.Learn and teach - wherever you are!I have been using Moodle mostly as a student at EuNC, but recently I have been helping the new teachers get the hang of the system and find out its opportunities. I love Moodle for having a web version as well as a mobile version because it helps me study wherever I am (especially during long commutes) and it's easy to use for the teachers as well because there are numerous features for various needs (for example, you can set other students' forum posts to show up only after you've created a post of your own as a student, therefore minimizing the temptation to read what others have written first and only then writing your own answer).,Numerous features that are useful for both teachers as well as students, for example, tests, forums, documents. Even tests themselves offer a lot of opportunities, for example, you can ask an open question or you can ask a question with a specific answer expected and students can see the results right after they hit "Submit" - students don't have to wait to find out how they did and teachers don't have to spend precious time grading :) Its drag-n-drop lesson creation is amazing and so easy to use. For a perfectionist, who wants everything to look nice and pretty, it's a good feature :D Its mobile app is great because it allows using the system even when you don't have access to your computer.,I enjoy Moodle and to be honest, I think the very few things I have stacked against Moodle are mostly related to how the system is configured for my university. Otherwise, it's a very useful tool and I love the opportunities Moodle presents for education.,10,Considering we have students from all over the world as well as teachers, Moodle has been perfect for our goals of uniting people from various countries in a seamless learning experience. Moodle has convenient features for teachers and students, which simplifies the educational process (for example, test grading is taken care of by the system). Moodle's mobile app makes it possible for people who don't have much dedicated free time other than commute, for example, to study anywhere and wherever they have time.,Typeform, Microsoft Dynamics 365 (formerly Microsoft Dynamics CRM), JIRA SoftwareChoose MoodleMoodle is the main LMS on campus. It is used as a landing board for instructional courses, storing online trainings, accessing job aid material, viewing panopto videos, etc.,Moodle is able to keep track of student data per course. Moodle is able to integrate outside programs such as Panopto that you can use within your course. Moodle is user friendly for the most part. Everything is self explanatory and it doesn’t take a lot of researching to find actions, activities, how to setup your course, etc. When editing your course, it’s very easy to add activities/resources to your course and Moodle explains, in detail, what each activity/resource is and how it will function within your course.,Sometimes Moodle has issues “communicating” with certain outside sources such as Lockdown Browser. When upgrading to the 3.4 version of Moodle, the campus is noticing that some activity plugins are not upgradable.,9,From my standpoint, I think Moodle has worked out very well on campus and has been well accepted by students, faculty & staff. Of course you have your good with the bad circumstances but that’s with any program you use.,Schoology and Blackboard,Wix, Microsoft Application VirtualizationMoodle on a Small College CampusMoodle is the learning management system for our entire campus of around 1300 students and 100 faculties. All courses taught are created within Moodle, and Moodle provides an online space for faculty to share content and expectations, communicate with students, engage students in online discussions, and provide grades and feedback to students.,Provides a space for faculty to share course content and feedback to students. Has an intuitive design, so new users don't face a steep learning curve. Facilitates students engagement and collaboration outside of the classroom. Helps students stay organized for multiple courses.,Moodle lags behind more sophisticated Learning Management Systems, such as Canvas and Sakai. Outside integrations are typically clunkier and less evolved than those for other LMS options. There is more unused white space in several of the most popular Moodle themes, such as SNAP and Boost than is necessary. This means there is a lot more scrolling and visual work demanded from the users than there should be. There isn't enough flexibility in course organization for several Moodle themes. The text editor is clunky, and the overall editing options are limited.,8,Our campus made the switch from another LMS to Moodle for financial reasons, and overall it has met our needs for a better price point that another LMS.,Canvas,Camtasia, Slack, Dropbox, BlueJeansFormer Moodle userAt our medium-size public university, we used it first as a secondary LMS in a pilot phase and then for 2 full years as our primary LMS. We have since migrated back to Blackboard. We used it to provide course shells for all courses on campus during the years it was our primary LMS.,It was extremely customizable. The layout, while not for everyone, was great for students - having everything clearly laid out. We were able to add photos to user profiles very easily - something that is not so easy on Blackboard.,The options were overwhelming to users sometimes. Grading was difficult to understand. Discussion forums were a step behind those of other LMS providers.,7,We had a negative return in that we spent a large amount of money converting courses to Moodle, then shortly after we moved back to Blackboard and had another large outlay of cash to convert them back (not very successfully). Operating costs are low once the courses are created and servers set up. LMSs in general are a great option for moving away from paper.,BlackboardMoodle vs everyone else - why it is time to embrace open-sourceMoodle is being used across the agency to develop and deliver education to all staff. In the coming months, with an ecommerce integration, we will be using Moodle to deliver education to volunteer staff and external partners.,Content management - Moodle has a strong database structure that allows for content to be stored locally and used in multiple instances without corruption of the data. Customizations - Moodle is highly customizable, with over 1000 plugins available, a very transparent API, and customizations available directly inside the platform, such as language, themes, and structure. Notifications and reminders - With the ability to customize who, when, and how notifications are sent and the ability to write custom notifications, students are always kept in the know.,Static pages - One area in which Moodle is not very strong is acting as a website, meaning not a CMS, but instead presenting static pages, such as faculty information or help documents. eCommerce - Although there are many add-ons and plugins available, many of which are inexpensive, Moodle does not come out of the box as a full fledge eCommerce site. Integration - Moodle has over 1000 plugins and you can write using their API relatively easily, however, Moodle does not, out of the box, integrate with other systems, such as how SharePoint LMS or Oracle does.,9,ROI - Using Moodle as our LMS platform has allowed us to cut over $100,000 out of our development budget as Moodle, as a platform, does not cost any money or require special development work to set up. Our in-house developer spun up a server farm, installed Moodle, and we were on our way. Credibility - Using Moodle as our LMS has allowed us to develop credibility with staff, vendors, and volunteers. Online learning has become the norm and without Moodle, we were not keeping up with the times. Efficiency - Because Moodle is mobile friendly, our theme is responsive, and all of our content is viewable on mobile devices (not flash based) we have been able to extend the learning environment, not only out of the typical classroom, but away from the computer as well.,Sharepoint LMS, Cornerstone OnDemand and Blackboard,MS SharePoint,2000
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Moodle
129 Ratings
Score 7.8 out of 101
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Moodle Reviews

Moodle
129 Ratings
Score 7.8 out of 101
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Zee Gimon profile photo
July 14, 2018

Moodle Review: "Learn and teach - wherever you are!"

Score 10 out of 10
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Verified User
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I have been using Moodle mostly as a student at EuNC, but recently I have been helping the new teachers get the hang of the system and find out its opportunities. I love Moodle for having a web version as well as a mobile version because it helps me study wherever I am (especially during long commutes) and it's easy to use for the teachers as well because there are numerous features for various needs (for example, you can set other students' forum posts to show up only after you've created a post of your own as a student, therefore minimizing the temptation to read what others have written first and only then writing your own answer).
  • Numerous features that are useful for both teachers as well as students, for example, tests, forums, documents. Even tests themselves offer a lot of opportunities, for example, you can ask an open question or you can ask a question with a specific answer expected and students can see the results right after they hit "Submit" - students don't have to wait to find out how they did and teachers don't have to spend precious time grading :)
  • Its drag-n-drop lesson creation is amazing and so easy to use. For a perfectionist, who wants everything to look nice and pretty, it's a good feature :D
  • Its mobile app is great because it allows using the system even when you don't have access to your computer.
  • I enjoy Moodle and to be honest, I think the very few things I have stacked against Moodle are mostly related to how the system is configured for my university. Otherwise, it's a very useful tool and I love the opportunities Moodle presents for education.
Moodle is great for universities and all educational opportunities other institutions might offer. It's convenient for both students as well as the teachers, which makes it a great tool to make learning easier. I really enjoy the fact that there are little things that make the experience more user-friendly, for example, when you post a forum reply, it shows you the number of words you've written. In cases when you need to write a specific number of words, this is a helpful thing for students as well as for teachers, who don't have to count the words using Microsoft Word or something.
Read Zee Gimon's full review
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May 21, 2018

User Review: "Choose Moodle"

Score 9 out of 10
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Moodle is the main LMS on campus. It is used as a landing board for instructional courses, storing online trainings, accessing job aid material, viewing panopto videos, etc.
  • Moodle is able to keep track of student data per course.
  • Moodle is able to integrate outside programs such as Panopto that you can use within your course.
  • Moodle is user friendly for the most part. Everything is self explanatory and it doesn’t take a lot of researching to find actions, activities, how to setup your course, etc. When editing your course, it’s very easy to add activities/resources to your course and Moodle explains, in detail, what each activity/resource is and how it will function within your course.
  • Sometimes Moodle has issues “communicating” with certain outside sources such as Lockdown Browser.
  • When upgrading to the 3.4 version of Moodle, the campus is noticing that some activity plugins are not upgradable.
Moodle is definitely helpful for instructors in any educational setting, but I would think Moodle wouldn’t be great in a corporate setting.
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May 16, 2018

User Review: "Moodle on a Small College Campus"

Score 8 out of 10
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Moodle is the learning management system for our entire campus of around 1300 students and 100 faculties. All courses taught are created within Moodle, and Moodle provides an online space for faculty to share content and expectations, communicate with students, engage students in online discussions, and provide grades and feedback to students.
  • Provides a space for faculty to share course content and feedback to students.
  • Has an intuitive design, so new users don't face a steep learning curve.
  • Facilitates students engagement and collaboration outside of the classroom.
  • Helps students stay organized for multiple courses.
  • Moodle lags behind more sophisticated Learning Management Systems, such as Canvas and Sakai. Outside integrations are typically clunkier and less evolved than those for other LMS options.
  • There is more unused white space in several of the most popular Moodle themes, such as SNAP and Boost than is necessary. This means there is a lot more scrolling and visual work demanded from the users than there should be.
  • There isn't enough flexibility in course organization for several Moodle themes. The text editor is clunky, and the overall editing options are limited.
Moodle is an open-source tool, so it is a great LMS for a tight budget; however, it isn't as developed or sleek as other LMS options. It's great as a basic tool for sharing course content and expectations, but I wouldn't recommend it for fully online courses or instruction that demands extensive online collaboration.
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Timothy Wenson profile photo
September 16, 2016

User Review: "Former Moodle user"

Score 7 out of 10
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At our medium-size public university, we used it first as a secondary LMS in a pilot phase and then for 2 full years as our primary LMS. We have since migrated back to Blackboard. We used it to provide course shells for all courses on campus during the years it was our primary LMS.
  • It was extremely customizable.
  • The layout, while not for everyone, was great for students - having everything clearly laid out.
  • We were able to add photos to user profiles very easily - something that is not so easy on Blackboard.
  • The options were overwhelming to users sometimes.
  • Grading was difficult to understand.
  • Discussion forums were a step behind those of other LMS providers.
Ideally, you'd have a group of people supporting Moodle that have knowledge of coding and can create custom modules. The code is 'free' so you can do whatever you want with it, but we had to hire a support team in order to help with the server management and creation of custom modules. I think it's great for an organization that has not implemented an LMS previously, it was very difficult for us to convert faculty to use it after they had spent many years getting comfortable with Blackboard.
Read Timothy Wenson's full review
Kevin David Swagler II profile photo
September 13, 2016

Review: "Moodle vs everyone else - why it is time to embrace open-source"

Score 9 out of 10
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Moodle is being used across the agency to develop and deliver education to all staff. In the coming months, with an ecommerce integration, we will be using Moodle to deliver education to volunteer staff and external partners.
  • Content management - Moodle has a strong database structure that allows for content to be stored locally and used in multiple instances without corruption of the data.
  • Customizations - Moodle is highly customizable, with over 1000 plugins available, a very transparent API, and customizations available directly inside the platform, such as language, themes, and structure.
  • Notifications and reminders - With the ability to customize who, when, and how notifications are sent and the ability to write custom notifications, students are always kept in the know.
  • Static pages - One area in which Moodle is not very strong is acting as a website, meaning not a CMS, but instead presenting static pages, such as faculty information or help documents.
  • eCommerce - Although there are many add-ons and plugins available, many of which are inexpensive, Moodle does not come out of the box as a full fledge eCommerce site.
  • Integration - Moodle has over 1000 plugins and you can write using their API relatively easily, however, Moodle does not, out of the box, integrate with other systems, such as how Sharepoint LMS or Oracle does.

Moodle is great for college and corporate settings alike. I have yet to see an instance where Moodle could not be customized to fit a particular need, all while not having the overhead of other LMS systems and still having the ability to be managed centrally by the agency deploying it (meaning you are not reliant on another company to manage). Moodle can be installed locally for testing, on a server farm, or in the cloud, depending on the need and scalability.

Moodle does require nesting of activities, which can be time consuming, however, this is by design to offer the most custom and specific learning and setup outcomes.

Read Kevin David Swagler II's full review
Helen Ware profile photo
September 30, 2015

User Review: "Moodle at McNeese"

Score 10 out of 10
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Moodle is being used across our university by all of our instructors. They are geared toward putting their syllabus up in each of their courses. We have approximately 2500 courses that run in the summer and in the fall. We also use it exclusively for our web courses for our adult learning programs. We do have the business problem of the budget that it addressed. It is an open-source management system which is basically free for our university to use. We were paying nearly $60,000 for the prior learning management system.
  • Moodle provides a vast variety of using technology in ways that the instructor or student with little experience with technology is able to use it. All of our instructors received beginning training in how to use Moodle before we switched over to it, so that they felt comfortable with the switch. They could come to the training more than one time if they chose to.
  • I give all of our instructors more advanced training when they choose to teach the fully online courses, and they also receive training in additional software. They also receive a webcam and they can also receive a document camera if they are a math or an accounting instructor.
  • They have also received Camtasia and Snagit which work well with Moodle. They may basically use any software and are able to upload their own videos, videos from the Internet, any sort of PowerPoints that they create with their own voice or video, extra technology, notes, etc. for the students.
  • The instructors use a variety of modules within Moodle. We have available for their use BigBlueButton, which is a webinar. It provides guests appearances and provides office hours for our instructors who have strictly web based courses. They also have Turnitin, which is the plagiarism tool, Turning Tech that is the linked in tool that provides a quiz taking that links to Moodle and to the gradebook. We also use Tegrity that delivers the instructors and the students with an additional tool that permits them to do a video, or a PowerPoint or allow the instructor to link to anything on the computer and to upload it into Moodle. We also have the Attendance module, which allows the instructors who take attendance in the classroom to give the students "points" for attendance. We are adding the Ebsco reading list for the library this summer, which lets individual instructors to add certain reading lists from the library for their individual classrooms.
  • Right now, our Moodle is not working with our Banner product in being able to bring our grades in from Banner directly into Moodle. This isn't a problem with Moodle, it is a problem with the integration with the product.
  • There are issues with the gradebook being difficult for the instructor to use because there are so many different ways to use it, however Moodle is working on a new gradebook component.
  • We make extensive use of MNet and there are many ways to use it, but again Moodle is in the process of improving it.
If they are able to self-host the Moodle product, I do recommend it. If they do not self-host it, I would not recommend having it hosted by someone else, because then it is no longer an open source.
Read Helen Ware's full review
Robin Sargent profile photo
September 15, 2015

"Moodle for the Corporate Noodle"

Score 9 out of 10
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Verified User
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At AmericanCybersystems we use Moodle as our training portal. We load all of our online training courses, our quick reference guides, our knowledge base articles, and our instructor led courses into the Moodle platform. Our training department is very small with only three members: the VP of HR, the Director of Training (me), and an Instructional Designer/Trainer. However, we are creating training at a fast clip and need a learning management system (LMS) that can keep up with the amount of content we want to put out, track the learners, and display the information in a clear and useful way.

American Cybersystems is an international staffing and solutions company. This means we have an accounting department, a billing department, vendor managers, recruiters, salespeople, customer service associates, and a solutions group. Our training department is responsible for the learning and development of the entire organization. There are many different skill sets that have to be taught and therefore there are several different mediums our training department likes to use in order to maximize the training effectiveness. Moodle has several different supports for all the different learning objects we like to use.
  • Reporting: Moodle does a great job of keeping track of all the users in the system. There are several different layers of reporting in Moodle. One can track user login time, interactions with course objects, activity logs, eLearning course (SCORM) scores, views of discussion boards, badges and more. Tracking in a training program is a chief concern for many reasons: ROI, engagement, improving future trainings, and insights.
  • SCORM packages: Loading a 1.2 SCORM package is easy and simple to do in Moodle. Also, the features for reports are really helpful if you have a course that needs to report variables. In many different LMSs it is nearly impossible to report variables (especially numeric ones) from a SCORM package. However, because Moodle reports "interactions" you can even create a survey and get the answers populated into Moodle for easy export to an Excel file. Not only is the reporting great, but all of the authoring tools that I have used are compatible with Moodle: Captivate, Articulate Storyline 1 & 2, and Lectora.
  • User Upload and Creation: In Moodle it is a snap to upload a ton of users. I have encountered other LMS programs that make user creation a burden. This is not the case with Moodle. All one needs is a username, password, first name, and last name in order to create a new user. A large group of users can be uploaded and created through a simple csv file. This has come in very handy when trying to load an entire department into the system. I just ask the department head to send me the csv file and press a couple of buttons and viola! Also, I can batch upload users to a cohort, so if it is a new department that is getting loaded because there is a new course created for them, I don't have to try to find each of the new users I just created and enroll them one by one. Instead, I can enroll the new cohort with the 'enroll cohort' button in the course. This has saved me so much time, so many times!
  • Support: Moodle is big and only getting bigger through the support and enthusiasm of the open source community. Anytime I have a question or an idea that I am not sure how to implement in Moodle I can always find an answer. There is the entire knowledge base of Moodle online, there are Moodle enthusiast sites, there are Moddle blogs, and there are instructional designers (corporate and higher education) who write, demonstrate, and talk about Moodle. There are also developers and tinkerers who create plugins, skins, and other applications to integrate specifically with Moodle. This means, if I have an idea and the function is not already in Moodle there is someone who has already created a solution and a plugin. There are even entire companies that are dedicated to making Moodle slick, like Moodlerooms.
  • Hosting: Hosting Moodle yourself is difficult. I wouldn't want to mess with all the things involved with hosting and maintaining Moodle on my own server. Hosting Moodle requires a web server with PHP and a database. However, this weakness is also a strength. Although it would be cumbersome to manage Moodle on one's own the fact that it can be done and freely really sets Moodle apart from all other LMSs.
  • Scheduling: The basic version of Moodle (no plugins) does not include a scheduling component. What I mean is there is not a way to schedule in person or webinar training sessions in the system and then track attendance. Unless of course it is all done manually and no one wants to do that. There is a face-to-face plugin that does just what I am talking about, but because of the way I have Moodle hosted plugins are not an option for me without going through a few hoops.
  • Cloning a Course: For one of my trainings there is a course that uses the local branch Director as the instructor. Therefore, I have to create the same course over an over again for each branch across the company. While there are a few ways to duplicate a course, there is only one way to duplicate the course and include all the badges, a backup file. This means I have to backup a course, create a new course, upload the backup, then go in and turn on all of badges. I want a magic wand button that clones a course exactly as it is; is that too much to ask?
  • Also, if I have to fix a typo in a SCORM package I have to reload that file to every single course that contains the file I fixed. My second wish is to have one place to load SCORM packages and then just point to them in the courses so there is only one place I have to go in order to upload a corrected file.
Moodle is great for both corporate and education (I have used it in both environments). Moodle is suited well for those who are willing to get their hands a little dirty. Not everything in Moodle is intuitive and you'll need to be curious and a problem solver in order to figure out which settings to use and how to perform certain functions. However, it is rewarding to learn Moodle because there is an entire community that is also using it and willing to help you out.

If you want an easy interface that is intuitive then Moodle might not be for you. When you are looking to use Moodle you should ask yourself a few questions about your needs.

Who is going to host your LMS? Is it going to be in-house or through a vendor? The answer to these two questions will answer several other capability questions for Moodle. For instance, if you will need to add a bunch of plugins in order to make Moodle customized to meet your needs, you will probably want to go in-house because several of the cost efficient Moodle hosts like mdlspot.net do not add plugins for you. Also, if the majority of your training is face-to-face, then you might want to consider the LMSs that cater to that type of instruction.
Read Robin Sargent's full review
Ted Burke profile photo
September 15, 2015

"Moodle 2.8 Review"

Score 10 out of 10
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Verified User
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Every course at the college receives a Moodle shell. Moodle is used extensively by 85%-90% of our faculty, and minimally by the rest. 100% of our student body uses Moodle for their courses. All new hires attend a workshop on using Moodle and the expectations of the college that everyone be at least a minimal user.
  • The new grade book is well received by our faculty. The new version is easy to set up and the improvements of viewing the grade book i.e names moving across the grade columns is a welcome improvement.
  • The attendance feature with the ability for teachers to comment on the reasons why a student is late, absent or sleeping is a bonus. The visibility of these things as part of the student grades view has reduced the number of "discussions" between teacher and student over attendance grades.
  • Our online faculty love the ease of use of the forums.
  • Our HR Dept uses Moodle for compliance training and makes use of the certificate module for proof of participation.
  • Faculty teaching cross-listed courses are able to link the multiple courses into one course for the ease of posting content.
  • The lesson module, while easier to use than previous versions, still causes our faculty to shy away from it.
The questions to ask when adopting Moodle lie more with the service provider than with Moodle itself. Questions around cloud based storage, ownership of content, data security (including student data) should be asked when vetting a hosting company. Our use of Moodle does not utilize all of the existing functionality, so Moodle is usually adequate to meet all of our LMS needs.
Read Ted Burke's full review
Stephen Lackey profile photo
September 15, 2015

Review: "Reflections on Moodle after returning to Blackboard"

Score 8 out of 10
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Verified User
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At my prior college, Moodle was used as the Course Management System, somewhat in conjunction with Campus Technology's CampusCruiser email/courseware offering. The two systems were not integrated, requiring a duplication of content. Both Moodle and Campus Technology offered online file storage and online calendar. CampusCruiser served also as email, in conjunction with the usual PIM stuff somewhat integrated (a calendar, tasks, email, contacts). Moodle had online file storage but only in connection with a specific class. Content shared between multiple sections of the same course required duplication, manually importing each file. This overlap typically caused confusion among students and instructors alike, creating even less consistency between courses and instructors than a typical LMS alone.

Many Moodle features were useful, including the ability to stage content with MultiMarkdown or plain text formatting. Other products often present either a MSWord-type interface or a raw HTML editor. AFAIK, Markdown content wasn't directly uploadable and converted, but had to be composed in (or cut/paste into) a text edit window.

Moodle has a number of open source modules that looked interesting, but I have not directly used them. These include integration with the content management system Drupal. Moodle's weakest point would seem to be the management of content, something which is readily solved with a CMS. In my opinion, a learning management system without adequate Content Management support somewhat defeats the purpose of a true LMS, since content can easily go stale without adequate management tools to update and leverage content across multiple courses.

Rubrics are present, but the management tools for rubrics are inadequate. Most grading criteria should be reusable across courses and instructors, for consistency. Using rubrics in Moodle seems to result in their being duplicated for each assignment, which became unmanageable across 4 classes with a couple dozen graded tasks per course. Rubric management for assessing instruction quality does not appear to be present in the default installation, but would be strongly encouraged. You do use consistent criteria for grading each assignment, right?

More advanced LMS features such as adaptive release for learning content, SCORM integration are present, but awkward to use. Moodle isn't a content creation or content management tool, and default integration is cut and paste. Adaptive release and SCORM content are very prohibitive without effective tools for creating content.

Like most open source projects, Moodle is free, as in the same sense as "free puppies". For a budget-strapped organization, free is very appealing. Keep in mind that the product doesn't run itself, so adequate staff skill is required to keep it running. The real value of Moodle would seem to be in customization to integrate with the organization's existing IT assets. If you don't mind learning an API and writing PHP code, there is an extensive amount of customization possible, that commercial products like Blackboard do not allow. If adopted, Moodle support and maintenance must still be budgeted.

For a non-education sector use, I believe Moodle is still a valuable asset, if used in conjunction with a content management system and adequate staff support. Alternative tools I've previewed seem to be excessive and less economical in terms of delivering instructional content. Internal training is necessary in all organizations, and an inch thick employee manual isn't always the best way to accomplish this. But, building useful learning content is a skill in itself, but a valuable one to develop.
  • Availability of third party open source modules to extend functionality. The stand-alone Moodle product is useful, but limited by the effort in setting up courses and content. The ability to integrate with Content Management systems (or possibly Document Management systems) is critical, and provides additional benefits to managing employee training and productivity.
  • Use of rubrics. These are external, explicit grading criteria to improve communication between instructor and learner regarding expectations and ways to improve performance. A management plan for rubrics is necessary, and not readily done internally within the Moodle default installation.
  • More complex learning schemes are supported, such as SCORM and other adaptive learning systems. However, for non-trivial course development, external tools for building this content is required.
  • Rubric Management. This may have been addressed in a plugin module.
  • Better tools for examining outcomes from exams and rubrics across a class, course, or organization. This may have been addressed in a plugin module.
  • Improved content management within the default installation. While there are modules that support products such as Drupal, building into the default product would ease adoption.
The most important one would be the resources available to support it. While this is true of any LMS product, the flip side of the flexibility and customization advantages is the cost and time to support the product.
Read Stephen Lackey's full review
Samantha Blevins profile photo
November 19, 2015

"A review of Moodle"

Score 6 out of 10
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Verified User
Review Source
Moodle is currently being used by our department to manage faculty development opportunities across campus. While we have not adopted it across the whole university it is a helpful, free tool to ensure our faculty have access to the opportunities they need in order to continue their own teaching and learning endeavors.
  • Organize information
  • Keep information secure
  • Disseminate information to others
  • Pages load slowly
  • Tool for more interaction
  • ePortfolio supported tool
Moodle is a great, free solution as an LMS. It has other application abilities as well. However, the lag time between pages can be frustrating.
Read Samantha Blevins's full review
Pamela Akins profile photo
October 02, 2015

User Review: "Moodle: Cheap and Easy to Use"

Score 7 out of 10
Vetted Review
Verified User
Review Source
We use it to manage the courses that we deploy through our website for professional development of our members, mostly librarians. It is used by a dozen divisions of our organization. It enables librarians to participate in professional development remotely.
  • It is Open Source, meaning the deployment is cheap, relative to other LMS systems considered.
  • There is a TON of documentation out there and support from a huge community of users from universities, corporate and other not-for-profits
  • There are later versions out (2.6) that solve problems and bugs of earlier versions and the interface changes are in favor of all users, (admin, facilitator and student)
  • Users can create their own profiles, and courses can be protected with an Enrollment Key set by the course creator.
  • It has a consistent interface that is fairly intuitive and easy to use.
  • Forums have been greatly improved in the later version. I am in hopeful anticipation of upgrading from 1.9 to 2.6 soon, for that feature alone.
  • Groups in 1.9 are clunky, but much improved, according to online users in later versions (2.2 and above).
  • Restore and Backup are sometimes irregular to the point that you may want to save a basic copy of a course in addition to depending on backing up a course to restore as a new course moving forward.
  • Not loving that we have to use a 3rd party for chat rooms (we use Flash Chat) and the chat history is stored in Moodle.
If you are limited in budget, this a great choice because the learning curb is small compared to an Adobe based LMS which is always expensive. If you don't have a lot of staff or money, Moodle is a good way to go because of all the support documents out there as well.
Read Pamela Akins's full review
Kristina Ierardi profile photo
September 25, 2015

"Moodle Review"

Score 7 out of 10
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Moodle is used across the entire organization. It is available to students for every course and available to faculty and staff for committees and group projects. It enables faculty to communicate with students online, post assignments, share notes and multimedia presentation, record grades, etc. It enables committees to share information in a protected environment.
  • It allows me to put my entire course calendar and syllabus onto a visual space that is accessible for all students. It enables linking to documents and multimedia.
  • It provides a protected system to store grades online.
  • It enables members of a group or course to communicate and share information in a protected environment.
  • It occasionally glitches when editing to add documents.
  • The grade book cannot be seen on one screen, you need to use two arrow buttons to scroll over and it is easy to lose track of the student's name/your place in that process.
  • Not everyone grasps the idea of Moodle and how to access it.
Moodle is well suited for creating a course calendar and visual experience with information links. Cost and ease of use are two questions I would ask during the selection process. I'd also ask about use on multiple platforms (PC, apple, tablet, phone, etc.)
Read Kristina Ierardi's full review
Patrick Wilson profile photo
September 25, 2015

Moodle Review: "Great for startup initiative."

Score 6 out of 10
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Moodle was used across the institution to support both online and traditional courses.
  • It is easier to customize when compared to other LMS options.
  • It is easier to integrate other products when compared to other LMS options.
  • It works well with video.
  • Moodle requires an advanced level of technical expertise to maintain.
  • Advanced support usually relies on peers. Lack of formal support when deployed as a low cost solution.
  • Benefit of low cost can be eclipsed by cost of maintenance in the long run.
Moodle can be a good option for startup programs not yet generating sufficient revenue.
Read Patrick Wilson's full review
Dan K. Carlsruh profile photo
September 25, 2015

User Review: "Moodle is Free (but there is a price)"

Score 6 out of 10
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Moodle is used to track the training delivery of state employees who are part of the Medicaid Team. It offers a onestop shop for online training modules, and reports scores to managers.
  • Easy to upload Captivate learning modules.
  • Reliable reports.
  • Good security.
  • Easy to upload user accounts.
  • Locked into a general appearance. Templates are available, but they are all basically variations on a theme.
  • Have to go through the back door to clean up European spellings, so you need to be comfortable editing database objects.
  • Moodle is generally built for academia. To make it more a corporate tool, you have to massage the product quite heavily. It's important to know HTML to do this.

Its academia background is very apparent, so corporations should know up front that there will have to be changes made to it so it fits their world. This will require a Moodle developer who is knows HTML and PHP.

Corporations are drawn to Moodle because it's "free." But they have to understand that downstream costs such as database personnel and HTML developers will add costs throughout the project.

They must also understand that there is no help desk. Moodle developers must be able to find answers through the Moodle community and other resources, then put the "fix" in place themselves.

Read Dan K. Carlsruh's full review
Lei Ye profile photo
September 24, 2015

User Review: "Moodle in Medical Education"

Score 9 out of 10
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Moodle is our university LMS and has been used across the whole institution for the past 6 years. In addition to being used to deliver student orientation, it is also used to support face to face class delivery and to manage students who are in various rotations across the Pacific Northwest. Moodle also facilitates student clubs and other learning activities outside the classroom.
  • Features like drag and drop and moving items around - these features make the course setup pretty easy.
  • Various types of activities and resources. We had faculty to use the Moodle "book" with video recording to meet the accommodation needs. "Page" could save space and help with content organization.
  • Customized course import. This makes the course import very simple. You can select the content you want to carry over to a new course.
  • Third party service. We work with a vendor to make Moodle communicate to different systems used in the institution.
  • Cohort admin. Creating cohorts for classes and faculty/staff groups helps with the admin side of the LMS usage.
  • "Log in as a user". This function reduces the burden of the trouble shooting process. Love it!
  • Planned upgrade. Instead of upgrading every month and having surprises, Moodle is in our hands.
  • Grade book. We encountered the problem of system locking student grades so the overall calculations were not accurate. Not sure if bulk edit has been implemented or not. We started to use another system to deliver grades to students.
  • Mobile app. Great try but still needs improvement.
  • Log file. We had hard time tracking course activities because the log file was not accurate.
We are a small institution and Moodle works fine for us, especially after we upgraded to 2.6 version.

  1. Moodle is pretty intuitive to use and the popup text helps explain functions well.
  2. There are lots of plugins that may improve Moodle's functionalities.
  3. Relatively low cost always makes Moodle an affordable option if your IT team is fairly robust.
Read Lei Ye's full review
Mike Brinkman profile photo
September 21, 2015

User Review: "Moodle, an LMS for the People"

Score 10 out of 10
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We use Moodle every day in a number of different ways. It functions as our Learning Management System campus-wide. We have a few different instances of Moodle set up for students and faculty, administrators and prospective students. It allows our faculty members to easily organize coursework and administer assessments online, which enables them to use their in class time more effectively, as well as reducing cost and waste associated with paper handouts. Another benefit is for our students, who have shown a strong preference to being able to access all of their content online, whether by computers on campus or on their own mobile devices.
  • Course organization - Moodle allows faculty members to organize their courses either by week or by topic so students can access their course materials in a logical chronological order. Additional blocks allow students to access content based on type, such as assignments, handouts, or quizzes.
  • Ease of use - Moodle 2.9 supports drag and drop features for many of its modules, making organizing/reorganizing a course, or building a course from scratch much quicker. It also has a fairly consistent set of controls across several content types which act in a consistent manner, so you can expect actions in one context to behave in the same manner as they do in other contexts.
  • Customization - Moodle allows a lot of customization with its plugin architecture, as well as custom themes, to help give Moodle the right look for your organization.
  • Restrictions - Restrictions allow you to powerfully manage who has access to what content and at what time. This is particularly useful for controlling the flow in which course materials are accessed. Content might be available only if a student receives a passing grade on a previous assessment, might only be able to see something if they are in a certain group, or might not be able to view some content before or after a set date.
  • Strong Community - Because Moodle is so widely used, it is fairly easy to find answers to most questions you may have.
  • Lack of drag and drop in some places - While drag and drop support is offered throughout, there are a few places where it is notably absent. The primary one is in the gradebook, and another is in the question bank. They make sense there, but have not been implemented yet.
  • Lack of support for some issues - Moodle's community is one of its greatest strengths as well as one of its greatest liabilities. While you can usually find an answer to questions you have on Moodle's community message boards, it is also possible that you have a more unconventional question that might not get answered at all. If you want to use Moodle for your organization, you will definitely need some tech savvy people to solve some of the trickier aspects of using Moodle. Likewise, support materials on the site don't cover all environmental variables and settings you might run across, so it requires some testing on your end to figure out what things do.
  • Modifying functionality can be difficult - Moodle is open source, which means that it can be modified by you. This is great, but as mentioned previously, the support materials and developer documentation can be lacking. It is very easy to shoot yourself in the foot if you make the wrong changes, so you should always make your modifications on a test server and make backups before deploying to your production servers. I know that's good advice for any kind of software, but it can be critical in Moodle, particularly if you use it for storing student grades.
Having had experience with two other Learning Management Systems, I can wholeheartedly endorse using Moodle in an educational environment. It is very well suited for the task at hand. It does an excellent job of allowing both teachers and learners do what they need to do without making things burdensome.

I have seen other institutions use Moodle as their Content Management System as well, but it seems less well suited for that task. I would not personally choose to use it as a portal for an educational site without some better integration for Student Information Systems. Better/easier SIS integration might change my opinion on this in the future.
Read Mike Brinkman's full review
Lein Shory profile photo
September 18, 2015

Moodle Review: "A Trusted LMS That Does (Almost) Everything"

Score 10 out of 10
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We use Moodle to deliver our professional development courses for K12 educators, both for online courses as well as face-to-face training. We've found that for us it offers the widest range of options for an LMS, and has been employed to serve a variety of needs, both for us and our clients.
  • In short, it's tried and true. Too many newer learning management systems look snazzy but many of their claimed features turn out to be "in development," i.e., vaporware. Moodle has been around and had time to learn what works and what doesn't, and make numerous improvements (and can be expected to continue to do so).
  • The extensive, active, and robust Moodle community is a huge point in Moodle's favor. You can count on plugins being tested, and if you realize you want to do a particular thing, chances are good that someone else has already thought of it.
  • Though we don't use it that often, the item analysis for quizzes is a terrific feature that isn't as readily available in many learning management systems.
  • We're believers in open-source products whenever possible.
  • There are so many features it can be easy to forget exactly where things are sometimes.
  • Newer learning management systems may have more elegant out-of-the-box UI. Moodle has extensive design capabilities, but extensive customization can prove complicated.
  • Like with any learning management system, there are always features you'd like to see, e.g., the ability to enroll cohorts in multiple courses at once.
We're a nonprofit focused on K12 educators, and it suits our needs quite well. No doubt there are simpler solutions that don't have as much of a learning curve. If your needs are very basic, you might want to look elsewhere. Moodle is, however, quite capable of scaling from the smallest job to the very large, and there are several hosts that provide terrific support.
Read Lein Shory's full review
Denny Hammond profile photo
September 15, 2015

User Review: "Moodle in Education"

Score 8 out of 10
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We used Moodle as our Learning Management System for kindergarten through twelfth grade at our school. We also used it as a professional development tool for our teachers. One great advantage of Moodle is it being open source. This allows for an organization to format their site just about any way they can dream if they have the right people helping. Not to mention it is a fairly cost effective solution.
  • Customizable - I have had the chance to explore many LMS providers and no provider seems to come close to the ability to customize as Moodle does. Since it is open source, anyone can build code to find solutions to challenges and share them with others. I am not sure there is a larger community working on any other LMS-type system.
  • Ease of use - the system is very easy to use for the end user. If organized properly, you can do just about anything that you might dream up.
  • Cost effective - Moodle is open-source and free. The only cost you might have is the cost of someone managing the administrative side and possibly add-ons that you purchase to enhance the experience of the end user.
  • Customer Service - If you would like customer service straight from Moodle, that is more challenging to receive. If you are ok with finding your own answers searching through Moodle forums and such, then this might be ok. It really helps to have an expert on staff that can manage the site and take care of the back-end logistics especially if you are a larger school/company. There will be questions and challenges that you would never imagine.
  • Starts as bare bones product- There are numerous ways to customize but you have to be willing to put in the time and effort to do it. The most basic product is not as dynamic as what other LMS options might be. However, given that, the upside can be greater.
  • Gradebook - One of the largest complaints we had from teachers was the way the Gradebook was set up. It is not user friendly and includes more technical pieces than it needs to share with an end user in most cases.
This is well suited for schools that have a strong Technology Director and technology plan in place. Moving to this or any product requires an evaluation period to determine if it will meet the needs of that organization specifically.

Questions you might ask include:
1) What are your needs as a school or organization?
2) Do you plan to build your own content or import content from elsewhere?
3) What professional development will I need to get everyone off to a smooth start?
4) Does it work with the systems that you might currently have in place?
5) What level of support do I need from an LMS provider?
Read Denny Hammond's full review
Mike Sebolt profile photo
August 19, 2015

Review: "Moodle - Free Learning Anytime and Anywhere"

Score 10 out of 10
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Our school system is using Moodle in two ways to address different issues. First, classroom teachers are using Moodle to extend their classroom beyond the four walls of the school building. Assignments, content and enrichment activities are available to students in an any time/any where environment. Second, the school system uses the Moodle environment to offer several courses during the summer months in a completely online environment. Students can take courses to meet requirements, get ahead or even graduate early. The Moodle environment is available to any faculty and staff wishing to utilize it.
  • Users have the ability to create a wide variety of question types. (Drag and Drop, Missing Words, Matching, Multiple Choice, etc.)
  • Because users are able to password protect their courses, copyrighted textbooks and other materials can be placed online. (unlike an open web page)
  • Moodle is easy to install and administer. Best of all, there are no real costs associated with Moodle other than IT time and space to host locally or in the cloud.
  • Because it is open source you need to be comfortable in a forum environment for help. Support also comes in the form of online help files.
  • Moodle releases several versions each year and makes it difficult at time to stay current. Not really a big issue however.
  • Moodle does require some IT expertise for the initial install and configuration if you choose to host your own instance.
Moodle is appropriate and has been utilized in the K-12 environment as well as higher education. I could also see it easily being used in the corporate world to house documentation and online training materials. I found it helpful to engage others who are using the product as sources of support and ideas.
Read Mike Sebolt's full review
Mitchell Baker profile photo
July 08, 2015

"Moodle Review: It keeps on truckin'"

Score 9 out of 10
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We are a private liberal arts college and use Moodle on campus and in our online program. Our instance of Moodle is hosted by MoodleRooms. I work primarily with the online education sector of the college and thus will respond from that perspective. We currently have over 600 students taking online courses and lead our tech support section for students and faculty. Moodle meets our needs for student engagement, tracking of activities, and of course grading.
  • I have found Moodle to be an easy LMS to learn, especially the basics. It only takes about an hour to get a faculty member to the place they feel comfortable with Moodle and to be able to engage the learner. The multiplicity of extra tools can be taught according the need of a course.
  • There is ease of administration for incorporating textbook publishers. Several publishers had detailed instructions for integrating course content within Moodle and protect the integrity of both products.
  • Faculty can add additional content easily. The university owns the content and maintains a uniformity of each of its courses. However, if an instructor finds additional content to enhance the class, such as Youtube or an article online, it is quite easy for them to add the link into the session.
  • Moodle is constantly changing for the better. Moodle itself is on version 2.7 and MoodleRooms is now releasing 2.6. One area that is a struggle for instructors is the grading of file attachments. Files must be downloaded, comments made, and then uploaded back into the file dropbox. Version 2.6 will make this better, if the student saves files in PDF.
  • One of shortfalls that frustrates me the most is the gradebook. It is easy to do quick grading within the assignment but if you go to the gradebook it is set up as a giant spreadsheet. This format is fine except that you are constantly scrolling either up or down or sideways to get to where you want to go. If you forget the column for the assignment you have to scroll to the top and hopefully you will not forget the row of the student you were working with. It would make it a lot easier to lock the assignment names and the student names, similar to what can be done in Excel.
  • A nice tool is that you can bring up an individuals grade sheet to show their marks on each assignment. However, it has no edit feature. I often award bonus points but not everyone will earn them. It would be much easier going to this individual grade sheet and make the adjustment.
One of the key questions to ask is whether or not your users need 24 hour access or are you an 8-5 shop. Education needs access 24x7 thus someone needs to be on call or at-the-ready if a server goes down or the internet connection fails. If you elect DIY because Moodle if free, do you have not only a server tech but an internet tech to set up and keep things up? Can you afford someone to stay on top of your Moodle instance anywhere from 10 - 20% of their time per month? These are some of the reasons to look for a hosting provider and there are many out there.

Moodle has so much to offer and the best Moodle people are those who love to tinker, tweak, and look for modules that make Moodle the exceptional tool that it is. It can be tailored to work with about any industry, if you take the time to research all the the bells and whistles that are out there.
Read Mitchell Baker's full review
Rebecka Anderson profile photo
February 25, 2015

User Review: "Moodle Magic!"

Score 10 out of 10
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The Virginia Early Intervention Professional Development Center, which is a project of the Partnership for People with Disabilities at Virginia Commonwealth University, provides online professional development opportunities for all early intervention providers in Virginia. The online training modules were developed to provide early intervention providers with ongoing learning opportunities that would be accessible regardless of location and time.

Each self-paced training was developed and designed using other elearning tools such as Lectora and Articulate. Once each training was completed, it was exported as a single SCORM package and then added to Moodle as a course. The self-paced trainings were added to Moodle to allow:

-Students to self-enroll
-Tracking of student progress (enrollment and completion)
-The recording/tracking of student assessment
-Students to view their grades and obtain a certificate of completion

Once a SCORM package (training) has been added to Moodle, there is little administrative work to be done.
  • Overall the administrative tools are easy to use, and with some experimentation it’s easy to get it to customize and setup your course. I’ve not taken a single course, or done any extensive reading and I’ve been able to use the tool. Like most, there are some points where I get stuck, but a quick search on the internet and I’ve got my answer.
  • I love the restrict access feature. Most courses have a certificate of completion module available. With the restrict access tool we can control when users see the option of obtaining the certificate and if a grade condition is required. It’s easy to manage the settings and it can be applied to each activity or resource that’s been added to a course.
  • The certificate module is excellent! It was easy to add to Moodle and easy to customize and add to each course. Previously we include certificates as part of each SCORM package. The problem with that was that if a user came back to download/print their certificate they had to launch the SCORM package/training and then navigate to it. With the certificate module, users can obtain it on the homepage of the course.
  • When adding blocks to the site it’s sometimes difficult to tell what is viewable as an admin vs a teacher or student.
  • The admin and navigation blocks are either on or off and can’t be customized unless you are willing to dig in and modify the code. It would be nice to be able to identify which links within each of those blocks is available to the student.
  • While there are themes to choose from, I would like to see more, and it would be nice if each theme had more built-in options for customization. Additionally, while you can choose a separate theme for mobile, it would be nice if you could apply the same theme to mobile and desktop, but with different levels of customization. For example, for the desktop I’d like a fixed width, but on mobile I want something fluid. Again, unless you’re willing to dig in to the code, this can’t be accomplished.
If you need a high level of graphic design, customization Moodle may not be the tool for you unless you are willing to get into the code and work with an existing theme or attempt to create your own. If you can be ok with using existing themes and just changing the header/footer and colors (depending on the theme) Moodle is the tool for hosting asynchronous elearning.

Aside from the back-end student tracking I like Moodle because I can "stack" a course. For example, I might start out with a single SCORM package as my course, but I can easily add new elements such as another SCORM package a discussion forum.

One of Moodle's greatest strengths is the high level of customization afforded to each course, but that can also be a weakness for someone completely new to elearning. For example, a course can easily be built without an external tool like Lectora or Articulate, but without an understanding of the user experience it would be easy to design a course that would be difficult to navigate and confusing to the user.
Read Rebecka Anderson's full review
Michael Soileau profile photo
September 25, 2015

Review: "Moodle, Tough to master but worth the effort"

Score 8 out of 10
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Mostly it's used by me as a supplement to scoring and guided learning. The problem it addresses is we need a long-term database of scores, an easy-to-repeat format to get the same quizzes and tests up, and a database of the users and how results improve over time.
  • Free and Open source, so it's free to try out and you can customize the look and feel of it, provided you have the technical expertise.
  • Well-documented and community driven. Makes it easy to find solutions to problems.
  • It's gotten better, but it takes a while to learn the innards of the system if you are brand new to it.
If someone has technical expertise and needs a low-cost solution they can try out and scale, Moodle is an excellent resource.
Read Michael Soileau's full review
Steve Covello profile photo
December 12, 2014

User Review: "Moodle 2.6: Like it but not loving it"

Score 6 out of 10
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Granite State College (part of the University System of New Hampshire) has over 70% of its credit enrollments as fully online, in both undergraduate and graduate studies programs. We support over 3000 students and about 200 faculty. We rely on Moodle exclusively as our LMS. It is hosted through Remote Learner, but we have a fulltime Moodle engineer. Our engineer is a programmer and experienced systems administrator from prior professional IT experience, and she is also a PhD candidate in studies related to teaching and learning with advanced digital systems. It is fair to say that we have maximized as much as we can from Moodle, given the limitation imposed on us by Remote Learner (we cannot implement certain features independently).

Our mission is to deliver high quality online learning experiences for degree-seeking adult learners (median age: 35, more women than men, most working fulltime + families). Moodle enables us to achieve this in a financially feasible way compared to the costs associated with Blackboard.
  • Moodle is open source, so it is "free". It can be installed locally or on a typical Web hosting service.
  • In the hands of people with the right skills, it is flexible, and has a lot of reporting capabilities if the administrator knows how to query the system.
  • With built-in LTI (Learning Technology Interoperability), it can connect to and exchange data with any third-party system that is LTI compatible. This is HUGE. Using LTI, however, is imperfect at times, so one must tenor expectations.
  • Moodle interface design and organization is inconsistent and sometimes labyrinthian. For most online instructors, the interface is not intuitive at all. We answer many support questions for simple things where good design would have made it self-evident to users. There are often far more choices and options for users than are needed, so there is some disorienting clutter.
  • No one understands the Moodle gradebook. No one. It is a total mystery. It is only with constant everyday use against multiple kinds of problems will anyone understand how to make the gradebook work properly. Most of our support calls center around this. However, I understand that the Moodle 2.8 gradebook will be significantly simplified.
  • Moving instructional content around in Moodle is clumsy. Instructors often make a total mess of their course content requiring Ed Tech staff to clean it up.
Moodle is OK. Not perfect, not terrible - but OK. In considering whether to use Moodle, take in to account that you will need at least one fulltime person who REALLY knows how to make it work, and who can set it up to maximize its capabilities. Someone with SQL/db programming capabilities is a big plus. As an open source system, you will have no real support system other than your own staff and what you can find online in the Moodle DEV community.
Read Steve Covello's full review
David Noffs profile photo
February 25, 2015

Review: "Moodle provides a flexible and fun teaching and learning environment."

Score 9 out of 10
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Moodle is being used as the primary learning management system (LMS) at Columbia College Chicago. The user base is in excess of 10,000 active users across all departments including academic (for courses) and administrative (for learning communities and resource hubs). Moodle allows faculty and students to work together effectively whether teaching face to face, flipped, hybrid or fully online. Because of the flexibility of the software and dynamic developer (open source) community, Columbia has been able to adapt the installation to a variety of needs with minimal resources. Moodle has proved mostly reliable except when starved of ram or hard drive space as is the case with any LMS.
  • Moodle is great as a teaching tool for enhanced face to face, flipped, hybrid and online teaching formats. The discussion forum feature remains the foundation of Moodle's success, but newly developed course formats like Grid Layout and Collapsed topics make the student user experience much more enjoyable and productive.
  • Badges in 2.5 and above enable administrators in our school to use the Moodle LMS as an in-house training site for faculty and staff. Moodle will help us create, monitor and maintain baseline standards for faculty and staff online course competency.
  • Moodle allows administrators and faculty course designers, for example, multi-section course coordinators, to create collaboratively, maintain and deploy course throughout departments.
  • Moodle provides flexible development of virtual learning communities that can be used for a wide variety of purposes including teaching, training, knowledge base, committee work and communicating resources and events to student cohorts (e.g. an upcoming faculty performance for all dance majors).
  • Some of the course activities can be difficult to learn including the lesson and workshop activities. However, I would highly recommend taking the time to learn using Lessons as this makes self-directed learning a breeze if that is your desired intent for an online training course.
  • The Attendance activity is a third party module that we use extensively at Columbia and it is difficult to set up and requires custom coding to have it accept U.S. date formatting. In addition, importing the Attendance activity from semester to semester is not advised as the sessions are not cleared from the previous semester leading to more work than should be necessary. While these issues make the implementation difficult, it works very well as an attendance taking tool once configured.
  • The grade book has been a consistent trouble spot for many of our faculty. Moodle provides so many features, options and settings, that many users are overwhelmed, confused and intimidated by the interface and language. If no changes are applied, Moodle will default to a perfectly acceptable aggregation method called, "Simple Weighted Mean of Grades". However, once the user starts to change the aggregation method to Weighted or Sum of Grades, for example, other settings will need to be adjusted. For the experienced user, it is an effective and full-featured tool set, but an "easy" button would be welcomed by most users.
Moodle can be a great LMS choice for many programs and institutions. Whether you choose to have your Moodle site hosted by another provider, or host it yourself, depends on the size of your program or institution but mainly on the resources you have to support your own server/s including dynamic storage and enough processing power, ram, and bandwidth to handle the number of users you expect. You can check Moodle's web site (moodle.org) for server requirements. While Moodle is an easy download and install for experienced IT professionals, tech savvy educators may spend more time with configuring and supporting their Moodle site than they can afford. Hosting companies can provide Moodle sites with mixed results in my experience. You want to make sure your students never experience a server going offline while they are completing an online test during finals week, so make sure you thoroughly check any relevant reviews of potential Moodle hosting services. That being said, there is nothing like the freedom and flexibility of having your own Moodle installation to let the creative institution express itself.
Read David Noffs's full review
Laura Farvour profile photo
December 18, 2014

Review: "Moodle from a Moodler: Open Source, Powerful, Awesome"

Score 9 out of 10
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The University of Minnesota adopted Moodle in 2008 with an implementation of Moodle 1.9, while concurrently running the Blackboard system, WebVista. In 2012, we completely decommissioned WebVista in favor of using Moodle as our primary course management system.

Moodle is used by our four coordinate campuses, including Crookston, Duluth, Morris, and Rochester/Twin Cities. Across all campuses, Moodle is used with approximately 65% of all courses, and approximately 70% of all enrolled students use Moodle for at least one course.

In addition to our academic use of Moodle, it is also used by departments across the University for employee training, housing and sharing resources easily within departments, and in some academic units for tracking promotion and tenure materials for their faculty.

Blackboard was an expensive course management system, and during the recession in 2008 the University was looking for ways to cut costs as much as possible. Moodle was a clear choice as a course management system because it is an open source software with an active development community, which allowed our developers to seek fixes and enhancements developed by other institutions, as well as providing our own back to the community.
  • Facilitates asynchronous interactions through tools such as Forums.
  • Creates a platform for instructors to reach out individually to students on coursework through the Assignment tool.
  • Allows for extensive and varied quiz questions, from standard multiple choice to complex calculated answers.
  • Gives our students one centralized place to access all course materials, helping them keep on track with their courses throughout the semester.
  • The Gradebook is an area that could use significant improvement. There are many different aggregation options, which makes the gradebook a very powerful tool, but it also makes it very inaccessible to beginner and intermediate users.
  • Forums should allow for both anonymous responses, as well as private responses.
  • The terminology can be improved for greater clarity. One example is "Common Module Settings". This is a setting which exists on all activities and resources. The function of these settings is to restrict by groupings and control visibility. "Common Module Settings" does not clearly indicate the actual functions in this section.
Moodle is very well suited for any institution seeking an online course management system to enhance the classroom experience, implement training, or provide a content hosting and sharing environment.

Because Moodle is Open Source software, a key question to ask during the selection process is "Do we have the development resources to maintain our instance of Moodle?". Moodle.org and the Moodle Tracker forums allow for community crowd-sourcing of solutions, but home-grown solutions are necessary.
Read Laura Farvour's full review

Feature Scorecard Summary

Course catalog or library (1)
9
Player/Portal (1)
9
Learning content (1)
10
Mobile friendly (1)
10
Progress tracking & certifications (1)
10
Assignments (1)
9
Learning administration (1)
9
Learning reporting & analytics (1)
9
Social learning (1)
10

About Moodle

Moodle is an open source Learning Management System used by educational institutions. The product is administered by the Moodle Project which is led by Moodle HQ in Australia.
Categories:  Learning Management

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