Apache Derby vs. Titan Distributed Graph Database

Overview
ProductRatingMost Used ByProduct SummaryStarting Price
Apache Derby
Score 7.0 out of 10
N/A
Apache Derby is an embedded relational database management system, originally developed by IBM and called IBM Cloudscape.N/A
Titan
Score 8.0 out of 10
N/A
Titan is an open-source distributed graph database developed by Aurelius. Aurelius is now part of Datastax (since February 2015).N/A
Pricing
Apache DerbyTitan Distributed Graph Database
Editions & Modules
No answers on this topic
No answers on this topic
Offerings
Pricing Offerings
Apache DerbyTitan
Free Trial
NoNo
Free/Freemium Version
NoNo
Premium Consulting/Integration Services
NoNo
Entry-level Setup FeeNo setup feeNo setup fee
Additional Details
More Pricing Information
Community Pulse
Apache DerbyTitan Distributed Graph Database
Top Pros
Top Cons
Best Alternatives
Apache DerbyTitan Distributed Graph Database
Small Businesses
SQLite
SQLite
Score 9.1 out of 10
Redis™*
Redis™*
Score 9.0 out of 10
Medium-sized Companies
SQLite
SQLite
Score 9.1 out of 10
Redis™*
Redis™*
Score 9.0 out of 10
Enterprises
SQLite
SQLite
Score 9.1 out of 10
Redis™*
Redis™*
Score 9.0 out of 10
All AlternativesView all alternativesView all alternatives
User Ratings
Apache DerbyTitan Distributed Graph Database
Likelihood to Recommend
7.0
(3 ratings)
8.0
(1 ratings)
User Testimonials
Apache DerbyTitan Distributed Graph Database
Likelihood to Recommend
Apache
If you need a SQL-capable database-like solution that is file-based and embeddable in your existing Java Virtual Machine processes, Apache Derby is an open-source, zero cost, robust and performant option. You can use it to store structured relational data but in small files that can be deployed right alongside with your solution, such as storing a set of relational master data or configuration settings inside your binary package that is deployed/installed on servers or client machines.
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Open Source
Titan is definitely a good choice, but it has its learning curve. The documentation may lack in places, and you might have to muster answers from different sources and technologies. But at its core, it does the job of storing and querying graph databases really well. Remember that titan itself is not the whole component, but utilizes other technologies like cassandra, gremlin, tinkerpop, etc to do many other things, and each of them has a learning curve. I would recommend titan for a team, but not for a single person. For single developer, go with Neo4j.
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Pros
Apache
  • Apache Derby is SMALL. Compared to an enterprise scale system such as MSSQL, it's footprint is very tiny, and it works well as a local database.
  • The SPEED. I have found that Apache Derby is very fast, given the environment I was developing in.
  • Based in JAVA (I know that's an obvious thing to say), but Java allows you to write some elegant Object Oriented structures, thus allowing for fast, Agile test cases against the database.
  • Derby is EASY to implement and can be accessed from a console with little difficulty. Making it appropriate for everything from small embedded systems (i.e. just a bash shell and a little bit of supporting libraries) to massive workstations.
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Open Source
  • Titan is really good for abstraction of underlying infrastructure. You can choose between different storage engine of your choice.
  • Open source, backed by community, and free.
  • Supports tinkerpop stack which is backed by apache.
  • Uses gremlin for query language making the whole query structure standardized and open for extension if another graph database comes along in future.
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Cons
Apache
  • It may not scale as well as some more mature database products.
  • Used it primarily from the command line with openjpa and jdbc, and from third-party clients such as Squirrel.
  • May benefit by providing more sophisticated tools to optimize query performance.
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Open Source
  • The community is lacking deep documentation. I had to spend many nights trying to figure many things on my own. As graph databases will grow popular, I am sure this will be improved.
  • Not enough community support. Even in SO you might not find many questions. Though there are some users in SO who quickly answer graph database questions. Need more support.
  • Would love an official docker image.
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Alternatives Considered
Apache
SQLite is another open-source zero-cost file-based SQL-capable database solution and is a good alternative to Apache Derby, especially for non-Java-based solutions. We chose Apache Derby as it is Java-based, and so is the solution we embedded it in. However, SQLite has a similar feature set and is widely used in the industry to serve the same purposes for native solutions such as C or C++-based products.
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Open Source
To be honest, titan is not as popular as Neo4j, though they do the same thing. In my personal opinion, titan has lot of potential, but Neo4j is easier to use. If the organization is big enough, it might choose titan because of its open source nature, and high scalability, but Neo4j comes with a lot of enterprise and community support, better query, better documentation, better instructions, and is also backed by leading tech companies. But titan is very strong when you consider standards. Titan follows gremlin and tinkerpop, both of which will be huge in future as more graph database vendors join the market. If things go really well, maybe Neo4j might have to support gremlin as well.
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Return on Investment
Apache
  • Being Open source, the resources spent on the purchase of the product are ZERO.
  • Contrary to popular belief, open source software CAN provide support, provided that the developers/contributors are willing to answer your emails.
  • Overall, the ROI was positive: being able to experiment with an open source technology that could perform on par with the corporate products was promising, and gave us much information about how to proceed in the future.
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Open Source
  • Steep learning curve. Your engineers would have to spend lots of time learning different components before they feel comfortable.
  • Have to plan ahead. Maybe this is the nature of graph databases, but I found it difficult to change my schemas after I had data in production.
  • It is free, so time is the only resource you have to put in titan.
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