Apache Derby vs. Oracle Database

Overview
ProductRatingMost Used ByProduct SummaryStarting Price
Apache Derby
Score 7.0 out of 10
N/A
Apache Derby is an embedded relational database management system, originally developed by IBM and called IBM Cloudscape.N/A
Oracle Database
Score 8.0 out of 10
N/A
Oracle Database, currently in edition 23c, offers native support for property graph data structures and graph queries. If you're looking for flexibility to build graphs in conjunction with transactional data, JSON, Spatial, and other data types, we got you covered. Developers can now easily build graph applications with SQL using existing SQL development tools and frameworks.N/A
Pricing
Apache DerbyOracle Database
Editions & Modules
No answers on this topic
No answers on this topic
Offerings
Pricing Offerings
Apache DerbyOracle Database
Free Trial
NoNo
Free/Freemium Version
NoNo
Premium Consulting/Integration Services
NoNo
Entry-level Setup FeeNo setup feeNo setup fee
Additional Details
More Pricing Information
Community Pulse
Apache DerbyOracle Database
Top Pros
Top Cons
Best Alternatives
Apache DerbyOracle Database
Small Businesses
SQLite
SQLite
Score 9.1 out of 10
SingleStore
SingleStore
Score 9.8 out of 10
Medium-sized Companies
SQLite
SQLite
Score 9.1 out of 10
SingleStore
SingleStore
Score 9.8 out of 10
Enterprises
SQLite
SQLite
Score 9.1 out of 10
SingleStore
SingleStore
Score 9.8 out of 10
All AlternativesView all alternativesView all alternatives
User Ratings
Apache DerbyOracle Database
Likelihood to Recommend
7.0
(3 ratings)
9.0
(178 ratings)
Likelihood to Renew
-
(0 ratings)
9.0
(6 ratings)
Usability
-
(0 ratings)
7.4
(5 ratings)
Support Rating
-
(0 ratings)
10.0
(4 ratings)
Implementation Rating
-
(0 ratings)
9.6
(3 ratings)
User Testimonials
Apache DerbyOracle Database
Likelihood to Recommend
Apache
If you need a SQL-capable database-like solution that is file-based and embeddable in your existing Java Virtual Machine processes, Apache Derby is an open-source, zero cost, robust and performant option. You can use it to store structured relational data but in small files that can be deployed right alongside with your solution, such as storing a set of relational master data or configuration settings inside your binary package that is deployed/installed on servers or client machines.
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Oracle
I believe Oracle Database is still the best RDBMS database which is the database to consider for OLTP applications and for Adhoc requests. They are good in Datawarehousing in certain aspects but not the best. Oracle is also a great database for scaling up with their Clusterware solution which also makes the database highly available with services moving to the live instance without much trouble.
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Pros
Apache
  • Apache Derby is SMALL. Compared to an enterprise scale system such as MSSQL, it's footprint is very tiny, and it works well as a local database.
  • The SPEED. I have found that Apache Derby is very fast, given the environment I was developing in.
  • Based in JAVA (I know that's an obvious thing to say), but Java allows you to write some elegant Object Oriented structures, thus allowing for fast, Agile test cases against the database.
  • Derby is EASY to implement and can be accessed from a console with little difficulty. Making it appropriate for everything from small embedded systems (i.e. just a bash shell and a little bit of supporting libraries) to massive workstations.
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Oracle
  • Best thing about it is that it supports PL/SQL which is helpful in writing complex quarries easily.
  • Its storage capacity , backup and recovery features make it the best database storage tool available.
  • Other thing I like about this software is its interface is so good.
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Cons
Apache
  • It may not scale as well as some more mature database products.
  • Used it primarily from the command line with openjpa and jdbc, and from third-party clients such as Squirrel.
  • May benefit by providing more sophisticated tools to optimize query performance.
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Oracle
  • The memory demand and management makes it impossible to run it in a container.
  • It is hard to perform local unit testing with Oracle even using the personal edition (aggressive all the available memory grab for itself).
  • Lack of built in database migrations (e.g. as Flyway).
  • The need to install the Oracle client in addition to its drivers.
  • The cost of running it, especially in the Cloud.
  • Comes with very spartan community grade client/management tools whereas the commercial offerings tend to demand a premium price.
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Likelihood to Renew
Apache
No answers on this topic
Oracle
There is a lot of sunk cost in a product like Oracle 12c. It is doing a great job, it would not provide us much benefit to switch to another product even if it did the same thing due to the work involved in making such a switch. It would not be cost effective.
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Usability
Apache
No answers on this topic
Oracle
Many of the powerful options can be auto-configured but there are still many things to take into account at the moment of installing and configuring an Oracle Database, compared with SQL Server or other databases. At the same time, that extra complexity allows for detailed configuration and guarantees performance, scalability, availability and security.
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Support Rating
Apache
No answers on this topic
Oracle
1. I have very good experience with Oracle Database support team. Oracle support team has pool of talented Oracle Analyst resources in different regions. To name a few regions - EMEA, Asia, USA(EST, MST, PST), Australia. Their support staffs are very supportive, well trained, and customer focused. Whenever I open Oracle Sev1 SR(service request), I always get prompt update on my case timely. 2. Oracle has zoom call and chat session option linked to Oracle SR. Whenever you are in Oracle portal - you can chat with the Oracle Analyst who is working on your case. You can request for Oracle zoom call thru which you can share the your problem server screen in no time. This is very nice as it saves lot of time and energy in case you have to follow up with oracle support for your case. 3.Oracle has excellent knowledge base in which all the customer databases critical problems and their solutions are well documented. It is very easy to follow without consulting to support team at first.
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Implementation Rating
Apache
No answers on this topic
Oracle
Overall the implementation went very well and after that everything came out as expected - in terms of performance and scalability. People should always install and upgrade a stable version for production with the latest patch set updates, test properly as much as possible, and should have a backup plan if anything unexpected happens
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Alternatives Considered
Apache
SQLite is another open-source zero-cost file-based SQL-capable database solution and is a good alternative to Apache Derby, especially for non-Java-based solutions. We chose Apache Derby as it is Java-based, and so is the solution we embedded it in. However, SQLite has a similar feature set and is widely used in the industry to serve the same purposes for native solutions such as C or C++-based products.
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Oracle
Oracle is more of an enterprise-level database than Access and SAP Adaptive Server Enterprise isn't getting developed much (some people wonder how close it is to end of life) but SQL Server is miles ahead of Oracle IMO in terms of user experience and comparable in terms of performance AFAIK. As stated, a vendor forced our hand to use Oracle so we did not have a choice. If you are looking for help with an issue you are having, there are lots of SQL Server articles, etc. on the web and the community of SQL Server developers and DBA's is very strong and supportive. Oracle's help on the web is much more limited and often has an attitude that goes with it of superiority and lacking in compassion, IMO. For instance, check out the Ask Tom Oracle blog - a world of difference. If you choose Oracle, go into it with eyes wide open.
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Return on Investment
Apache
  • Being Open source, the resources spent on the purchase of the product are ZERO.
  • Contrary to popular belief, open source software CAN provide support, provided that the developers/contributors are willing to answer your emails.
  • Overall, the ROI was positive: being able to experiment with an open source technology that could perform on par with the corporate products was promising, and gave us much information about how to proceed in the future.
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Oracle
  • Oracle Database 12c has had a very positive impact on our ability to build strong and robust custom applications in house without the need to come up with our own methods of data storage and management.
  • Oracle Database 12c has the strongest user interface of any database I have worked with and continuously is improving its strength with the addition of support for JSON and XML type objects in the database.
  • Oracle Database 12c is sometimes very heavy and DBA intensive, but the benefits far outweigh the costs, which we need to spend on DBA support for enabling security and access features.
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