Jenkins vs. Selenium

Overview
ProductRatingMost Used ByProduct SummaryStarting Price
Jenkins
Score 8.3 out of 10
N/A
Jenkins is an open source automation server. Jenkins provides hundreds of plugins to support building, deploying and automating any project. As an extensible automation server, Jenkins can be used as a simple CI server or turned into a continuous delivery hub for any project.N/A
Selenium
Score 8.1 out of 10
N/A
Selenium is open source software for browser automation, primarily used for functional, load, or performance testing of applications.N/A
Pricing
JenkinsSelenium
Editions & Modules
No answers on this topic
No answers on this topic
Offerings
Pricing Offerings
JenkinsSelenium
Free Trial
NoNo
Free/Freemium Version
YesNo
Premium Consulting/Integration Services
NoNo
Entry-level Setup FeeNo setup feeNo setup fee
Additional Details
More Pricing Information
Community Pulse
JenkinsSelenium
Considered Both Products
Jenkins
Chose Jenkins
Bamboo has 100 plugins versus 1100 with Jenkins. Bamboo integrates well with Atlassian suite (as it should), but so does Jenkins with the dev community efforts. Test automation with tools like Selenium is excellent on Jenkins.
Chose Jenkins
We considered using Gitlab, but after some comparing, we found Jenkins was better in every way!
Chose Jenkins
I have not used many other products similar to Jenkins
Chose Jenkins
Travis CI and AppVeyor are good services that provide rudimentary support for builds, but they focus on Linux/OSX and Windows respectively, meaning that cross-platform builds will need to use both services. They are free for open source projects on GitHub, so they are seen …
Chose Jenkins
Jenkins and Hudison were originally the same source. I prefer Jenkins. Because it is open source, and has a large community to support. I am not familiar with Bamboo. So nothing to say about that.
Selenium
Chose Selenium
It is one of the leading open source tools with lot of good features to go well with web automation.
Chose Selenium
Selenium supports more browsers, selenium has huge open source community, and, best of all, it's free
Chose Selenium
  • More flexible.
  • Supports multiple browsers.
  • Can be used for mobile testing.
Chose Selenium
HP UFT vs. Selenium - the major difference is that Selenium is free and open source. So there is a lot of money saved upfront on licensing - moreover with UFT/QTP VB scripting is a must and VB is not a very flexible language, is outdated and is a hard skill to find these days.
Top Pros
Top Cons
Best Alternatives
JenkinsSelenium
Small Businesses
GitLab
GitLab
Score 8.9 out of 10
BrowserStack
BrowserStack
Score 8.3 out of 10
Medium-sized Companies
GitLab
GitLab
Score 8.9 out of 10
ReadyAPI
ReadyAPI
Score 7.6 out of 10
Enterprises
GitLab
GitLab
Score 8.9 out of 10
ignio AIOps
ignio AIOps
Score 8.1 out of 10
All AlternativesView all alternativesView all alternatives
User Ratings
JenkinsSelenium
Likelihood to Recommend
8.1
(69 ratings)
9.2
(55 ratings)
Likelihood to Renew
-
(0 ratings)
9.2
(6 ratings)
Usability
5.0
(3 ratings)
8.8
(6 ratings)
Performance
8.9
(6 ratings)
-
(0 ratings)
Support Rating
6.6
(6 ratings)
8.3
(11 ratings)
Implementation Rating
-
(0 ratings)
9.0
(3 ratings)
User Testimonials
JenkinsSelenium
Likelihood to Recommend
Open Source
Jenkins is a highly customizable CI/CD tool with excellent community support. One can use Jenkins to build and deploy monolith services to microservices with ease. It can handle multiple "builds" per agent simultaneously, but the process can be resource hungry, and you need some impressive specs server for that. With Jenkins, you can automate almost any task. Also, as it is an open source, we can save a load of money by not spending on enterprise CI/CD tools.
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Open Source
When you have to test the UI and how it behaves when certain actions are performed, you need something that can automate the browsers. This is where Selenium comes to the rescue. If you have to test APIs and not the frontend (UI), I would recommend going with other libraries that support HTTP Requests. Selenium is good only when you have no choice but to run the steps on a browser.
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Pros
Open Source
  • Automated Builds: Jenkins is configured to monitor the version control system for new pull requests. Once a pull request is created, Jenkins automatically triggers a build process. It checks out the code, compiles it, and performs any necessary build steps specified in the configuration.
  • Unit Testing: Jenkins runs the suite of unit tests defined for the project. These tests verify the functionality of individual components and catch any regressions or errors. If any unit tests fail, Jenkins marks the build as unsuccessful, and the developer is notified to fix the issues.
  • Code Analysis: Jenkins integrates with code analysis tools like SonarQube or Checkstyle. It analyzes the code for quality, adherence to coding standards, and potential bugs or vulnerabilities. The results are reported back to the developer and the product review team for further inspection.
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Open Source
  • For any web based UI automation, Selenium is the best tool out there to automate your tests.
  • It supports multiple coding languages like Java, Python, Ruby, C# etc.. to choose from.
  • There is a huge community of users and can get many answers on StackOverFlow.
  • It has lot of other plugins to make your tests even more efficient.
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Cons
Open Source
  • The UI could be slightly better, it feels kind of like the 90s, but it works well.
  • An easier way to filter jobs other than views on the dashboard.
  • An easier way to read the console logs when tests do fail.
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Open Source
  • Selenium is pretty user-friendly but sometimes tests tend to flake out. I'd say roughly one out of twenty tests yields a false positive.
  • Selenium software cannot read images. This is a minor negative because a free plug-in is available from alternate sources.
  • Slowness may be a minor factor with Selenium, though this is an issue with basically any testing software since waiting on a site to execute JavaScript requires the browser to wait for a particular action.
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Likelihood to Renew
Open Source
No answers on this topic
Open Source
We love this product mainly because of its high customization abilities and the ease of use. Moreover, its free and can be learned easily through online communities and videos. The tests are more consistent and reliable as compared to Manual tests. It has enabled us to test a large number of features all in one go, which would have impossible through manual tests. The reports generated at the end of the tests are really helpful for the QA and the development teams to get a fair view of the application.
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Usability
Open Source
While the day to day use is very easy, the configuration and setting up of the system or new projects can be cumbersome.
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Open Source
As I mentioned earlier, the reason I use Selenium is because there is a fairly widespread community of users, and user support services are at a good level. because the application is open source, it works on many platforms (Windows, Linux, IOS) without any problems. In addition, it gives us a lot of options for writing functional tests. For errors that we receive through the application, we can easily find the reasons for errors in the forums.
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Performance
Open Source
No, when we integrated this with GitHub, it becomes more easy and smart to manage and control our workforce. Our distributed workforce is now streamlined to a single bucket. All of our codes and production outputs are now automatically synced with all the workers. There are many cases when our in-house team makes changes in the release, our remote workers make another release with other environment variables. So it is better to get all of the work in control.
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Open Source
No answers on this topic
Support Rating
Open Source
There is a large development community - but it is shifting as people move towards other tools. A lot of companies still use Jenkins and will build propriety tools, which doesn't help any of the open-source community. Jenkins has a lot of help and support online, but other, more modern, alternatives will have better support for newer tech.
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Open Source
Selenium does not have technical support available easily. You have to go through forums to get the information you need. However, there are excellent forums out there that make it easy to troubleshoot. The open-source flexibility makes it difficult to have dedicated support.
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Implementation Rating
Open Source
No answers on this topic
Open Source
We did everything we needed to use it. Now we can execute our tests on different operational systems and browsers running few tests simultaneously. We also implemented Appium framework to execute our tests on mobile devices, such as iPhones, iPads, Android phones and tablets. We use SauceLabs for our test execution and Jenkins for continuous integration.
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Alternatives Considered
Open Source
Overall, Jenkins is the easiest platform for someone who has no experience to come in and use effectively. We can get a junior engineer into Jenkins, give them access, and point them in the right direction with minimal hand-holding. The competing products I have used (TravisCI/GitLab/Azure) provide other options but can obfuscate the process due to the lack of straightforward simplicity. In other areas (capability, power, customization), Jenkins keeps up with the competition and, in some areas, like customization, exceeds others.
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Open Source
At the time of adoption, there were not many other alternatives that were even close to being competitive when it comes to browser testing. As far as I know now to this day, there is still little competition to Selenium for what it does. Any other browser-based testing still utilises Selenium to interact with the browser.
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Return on Investment
Open Source
  • Faster Time-to-Market: Jenkins automate the build, testing, and deployment process, enabling faster feedback and continuous improvement.
  • Improved Quality: Jenkins automatically run unit tests and integration tests, ensuring that code changes meet the necessary quality standards.
  • Cost Savings: Jenkins is an open-source tool that is free to use
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Open Source
  • There hasn’t been a downside to using it yet other than we’ve got to update the programs we create for each change.
  • This has saved us hundreds of hours of manpower by allowing our automation engineer to rapid fire tests.
  • We are able to screenshot and save entire sites before and after launch with a program the automation engineer created
  • We can compare large volumes of data against data in excel docs with a program created using Selenium
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ScreenShots